Battleground UA

Battleground UA Races

President

U.S. Senate

U.S. House of Representatives

Governor

UA Senate Allies

Lisa Murkowski
Alaska
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Lisa Murkowski

Lisa Murkowski, Alaska’s senior U.S. Senator, is a third generation Alaskan proudly serving as the first Alaskan born senator. Murkowski was born in Ketchikan and raised in towns across the state, including Wrangell, Juneau, Fairbanks, and Anchorage. She is married to Verne Martell and they have two grown sons. Lisa loves spending time in the Alaska outdoors. She’s an avid skier, has hiked on glaciers, enjoys fall duck hunts, and has a pretty impressive King Salmon mounted on her office wall.

Since joining the Senate in 2002, Senator Murkowski has worked tirelessly for Alaskans and earned a reputation in the Senate for her ability to work collaboratively and across the aisle to reach common sense solutions. Murkowski is well-known for her love and dedication to her state, which means putting Alaska first.

A leader on energy and public lands issues, Senator Murkowski recognizes that sound national policy will promote not only job creation and economic growth, but also higher standards of living and greater global stability. She supports the safe and efficient production and use of all forms of domestic energy, as well as research to help develop emerging technologies. Senator Murkowski continues to pursue policies to advance renewable energy, increase energy efficiency, and make America’s energy cleaner, more affordable, and more reliable.

Senator Murkowski has long-advocated for the Arctic as a national priority and continues to push the United States to invest in the infrastructure and assets critical to supporting an Arctic strategy. She is leading the charge to recapitalize and expand America’s fleet of icebreakers and has introduced legislation to raise the nation’s presence in the Arctic through two bills that support responsible research and development as well as giving those who live in the region a greater voice on policy and research.

She is the Chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee and also serves on the Senate Appropriations Committee, where she is the Chairman of the Interior and Environment Subcommittee. Senator Murkowski is a member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee – the first Alaskan to serve on that panel – and also is a senior member of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee.

Doug Jones
Alabama
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Doug Jones

Senator Doug Jones has spent his life working to make Alabama a better place. Born in Fairfield in 1954 to a U.S. Steel worker and a stay-at-home mom, he grew up in Alabama during a period of great change and played a critical part of helping the state and her people overcome some of their darkest days. His early years forged his values and a sense of responsibility to treat everyone with dignity and respect. 

Senator Jones grew up during the tumultuous era of public school desegregation in Alabama. From a young age, he was drawn to fighting for what is right. He also found a love for politics and organizing through his volunteer work with campus affairs at the University of Alabama and in a statewide campaign to modernize Alabama’s court system.

After graduating from Cumberland School of Law at Samford University, he worked as staff counsel to the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee for Senator Howell Heflin. Following his stint in Washington, Senator Jones served as an Assistant United States Attorney from 1980-1984. He left government service in 1984 and was in the private practice of law in Birmingham, Alabama, until President Bill Clinton nominated him to the position of United States Attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. His nomination was confirmed by the Senate in November 1997 and he served as U.S. Attorney until June 2001. It was while serving in that position that Senator Jones successfully prosecuted two of the four men responsible for the 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church—finally bringing full justice and closure nearly 40 years after the attack that killed four young girls. Along with taking on the Ku Klux Klan, he indicted domestic terrorist Eric Rudolph and prosecuted other criminals who sought to use fear, hatred, and violence to inhibit the rights of others. 

Since his election to the Senate in a special election held on December 12, 2017, Senator Jones has brought that lifelong passion for justice and commitment to service to his role in the United States Senate. He understands that public service is a privilege that comes with the responsibility of making the country better for all Americans, regardless of their backgrounds or political views. He will continue to fight to increase access to affordable health care for every Alabamian and to make sure that every child in every ZIP code has access to high-quality education. He will fight for responsible economic development to ensure that both businesses and their employees prosper in Alabama.

Chris Coons
Delaware
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Chris Coons

Chris has spent his career in the Senate focused on working across the aisle to get things done for the people of Delaware. In recent years, the Bipartisan Policy Center recognized Chris for his commitment to bipartisanship and awarded him its Legislative Action Award and the independent congressional tracking website GovTrack ranked Chris in the top three most productive Senators of both parties.

Putting pragmatism ahead of politics, Chris has partnered with Republicans and Democrats alike to address key issues facing Delaware and the country. Chris has worked relentlessly with his colleagues on both sides of the aisle to provide resources for those struggling with drug addiction and to curb the impact of the opioid crisis. As a result of Chris and his colleagues’ efforts, the Senate passed a comprehensive bill in 2018 that improves prevention, treatment, and recovery to combat the epidemic. Earlier that same year, legislation based on Chris’s American Dream Accounts Act, which expands access to technical training and higher education to students in Delaware and across the country, was signed into law. In 2016, President Obama signed into law the Defend Trade Secrets Act, a bill Chris introduced with Republican Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah to better protect American invention and innovation.

Chris serves on the Senate Appropriations, Foreign Relations, Judiciary, Small Business and Entrepreneurship, and Ethics committees. He is the vice chair of the Ethics Committee and the senior Democrat on two subcommittees: The Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Intellectual Property and the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government.

Chris is committed to bipartisan engagement, especially about the issues that matter most to Delawareans and the country. He co-founded and leads the Senate Human Rights Caucus, the Senate Competitiveness Caucus, the Senate Law Enforcement Caucus, the bipartisan Senate Climate Solutions Caucus, the Senate ALS Caucus, and the Senate Chicken Caucus.

Before his election to the U.S. Senate in 2010, Chris served as New Castle County Council President for four years and New Castle County Executive for six years. Prior to serving as County Executive, Chris worked as an attorney for Delaware-based W.L. Gore & Associates, one of the 200 largest privately held manufacturing companies in the United States. As a law student, Chris founded the Delaware chapter of the national “I Have a Dream” Foundation, which helps low-income students make the academic journey from elementary school through college. Shortly after receiving his law degree and clerking on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, Chris began working at the organization's national office. While there, he launched and ran the organization’s AmeriCorps program, which helped recruit and train volunteers to mentor students in fifteen cities.

Chris graduated from Amherst College with a B.A. in Chemistry and Political Science in 1985. While in college, Chris spent a semester studying at the University of Nairobi in Kenya.

He returned to the continent in 1987 to work with the South African Council of Churches in the anti-apartheid movement. Chris earned his law degree from Yale Law School and has a master’s degree in Ethics from Yale Divinity School.

Chris grew up attending Red Clay Creek Presbyterian Church in Wilmington, DE, and was an ordained elder with West Presbyterian Church. He continues to preach regularly at houses of worship across Delaware. In February 2019, he and Republican Senator James Lankford of Oklahoma co-chaired the 67th annual National Prayer Breakfast, a tradition dating back to President Eisenhower that brings Americans of all backgrounds, faiths, and political parties together through a celebration of spirituality and prayer. Chris regularly participates in the weekly Senate Prayer Breakfast.

Chris lives in Wilmington with his wife, Annie, and their three children, Michael, Jack, and Maggie.

Dick Durbin
Illinois
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Dick Durbin

Senator Dick Durbin, a Democrat from Springfield, is the 47th U.S. Senator from the State of Illinois, the state’s senior senator, and the convener of Illinois’ bipartisan congressional delegation.

Durbin also serves as the Democratic Whip, the second highest ranking position among the Senate Democrats. Senator Durbin has been elected to this leadership post by his Democratic colleagues every two years since 2005.

Elected to the U.S. Senate on November 5, 1996, and re-elected in 2002, 2008, and 2014, Durbin fills the seat left vacant by the retirement of his long-time friend and mentor, U.S. Senator Paul Simon.

Durbin sits on the Senate Judiciary, Appropriations, Agriculture, and Rules Committees. He is the Ranking Member of the Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Immigration and the Appropriations Committee's Defense Subcommittee.

Senator Durbin makes approximately 50 round trips a year between Washington and Illinois. He is married to Loretta Schaefer Durbin. Their family consists of three children--Christine (deceased), Paul and Jennifer--as well as six grandchildren. They reside in Springfield.

Deb Fischer
Nebraska
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Deb Fischer

A lifelong Nebraskan, Deb Fischer is the senior senator from Nebraska. In November 2012, Fischer was first elected to the U.S. Senate becoming the first Nebraska woman elected to a full term and the first Nebraska state senator elected directly after service in the state legislature. Six years later, in November 2018, Nebraskans overwhelmingly voted to send her back to the U.S. Senate for a second term.

Fischer is committed to working with Republicans and Democrats alike to advance sensible policies that will promote strong Nebraska families and communities. 

Senator Fischer believes the first duty of Congress is to defend the nation. As a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, she is committed to defending against growing threats to our homeland and our allies. In her capacity as chairman of the Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces, she is focused on ensuring that our nation has a nuclear deterrent that is modern and effective. This subcommittee also has direct oversight of U.S. Strategic Command, which is located in Nebraska.

Fischer also serves on the Senate’s Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee and serves as chairman of the Subcommittee on Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Infrastructure, Safety and Security. This chairmanship enables her to continue leading on transportation issues, which have been one of her top priorities dating back to her chairmanship of the Nebraska Legislature’s Transportation and Telecommunication Committee.

In addition to the Armed Services and Commerce Committees, Senator Fischer sits on the Senate Agriculture Committee, a vital committee to Nebraska where agriculture is the economic engine of the state. Fischer is a Nebraska cattle rancher with over 40 years of real-life experience working with agriculture producers and rural and economic development groups across the state. As Nebraska’s voice on this committee, she works to cut regulations negatively affecting agriculture and open up new trade opportunities for farmers and ranchers.

Senator Fischer is a member of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s leadership team, serving as counsel to the Majority Leader. In this position, which she has held since 2015, she presents the concerns of Nebraskans directly to the Republican Senate leadership.

Before her election to the U.S. Senate, Fischer served in the Nebraska Unicameral, representing the 43rd Legislative District since 2004. During her time in the state legislature, she chaired the Transportation and Telecommunications Committee. She was also a member of the Revenue Committee, the Natural Resources Committee, and the Executive Board.

Born and raised in Lincoln, Nebraska, Senator Fischer attended the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and graduated with a degree in education. She and her husband, Bruce, have been married for over 40 years and own a ranching business near Valentine. They have three sons and three grandchildren.

Jeanne Shaheen
New Hampshire
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Jeanne Shaheen

The first woman in U.S. history to be elected both a Governor and a United States Senator, New Hampshire’s Jeanne Shaheen is a trailblazer with a reputation for working across the aisle to get things done. She is committed to serving the citizens of New Hampshire and is known for her common-sense leadership, hard work and dedication to improving the lives of the middle class. She has served in the Senate since 2009 and is a member of the Senate Committees on Armed Services, Foreign Relations, Appropriations, Small Business and Entrepreneurship and the Select Committee on Ethics.

As a former small business owner, Senator Shaheen knows how tough it can be for entrepreneurs, who often operate on razor thin profit margins. On the Small Business Committee, she’s expanded small businesses’ access to credit and markets. Her annual Experience New Hampshire event in Washington, D.C., gives New Hampshire businesses a forum to showcase their products and services to policymakers and government officials. Shaheen continues to lead efforts in the Senate to protect New Hampshire businesses from having to unfairly collect internet sales taxes for other states.

The opioid epidemic is the worst public health crisis in New Hampshire’s history, and Senator Shaheen has made fighting this crisis her number one priority in Congress. Through her leadership on the Appropriations committee, Senator Shaheen worked to deliver a seven fold increase in resources to help Granite Staters suffering from substance use disorders receive desperately needed treatment. She works across the aisle to provide tools that treatment providers, law enforcement and first responders need to deliver lifesaving services.

Shaheen helped pass the Affordable Care Act, and has defended the law from partisan attacks, ensuring that tens of thousands of Granite Staters can keep their health care. The law drastically expanded the availability of drug treatment in New Hampshire through Medicaid Expansion, a vital tool to address the opioid crisis, and provided protections to people with pre-existing conditions. She continues to lead efforts in the Senate to advance common-sense health care legislation that would expand access to care and lower the costs of both treatment and prescription drugs. 

As top ranking woman of the Armed Services committee and the only woman on the Foreign Relations committee, Senator Shaheen advocates for a strong foreign policy that confronts our enemies, strengthens key alliances, and bolsters New Hampshire’s role in our national defense. Shaheen’s strong stance against Vladimir Putin’s aggression, led to her being sanctioned by the Kremlin and denied a visa to travel to Russia. Shaheen is a leader on protecting our democratic institutions from foreign intrusion, enhancing our cyber defenses, and working with our allies to improve trade and security cooperation. She has been a consistent advocate for the critical role the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Pease Air National Guard Base and New Hampshire's defense-related companies, serve in protecting our nation.

Senator Shaheen is a champion for women here at home and around the globe. In 2018, she worked to broaden the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in order to better investigate and prosecute violent crimes against women. In 2016, President Obama signed into law the Shaheen-authored Sexual Assault Survivors’ Rights Act, a federal bill of rights for sexual assault survivors. Jeanne Shaheen has also been a consistent supporter of Planned Parenthood and the critical health services it provides to thousands of Granite Staters. She has led bipartisan efforts in Congress to permanently repeal the Trump administration’s expanded Global Gag Rule, which undermines the availability of family planning and other health care services in developing countries, and got legislation signed into law that gives women a seat at the table to better facilitate lasting conflict resolution around the world.

New Hampshire is the only state in the nation without a full service VA hospital.  To expand health services for veterans, Shaheen worked with members of both parties to pass VA reforms enabling Granite State veterans to receive quality health care outside the VA system and closer to home.

Senator Shaheen has made streamlining government and fiscal responsibility a hallmark of her career in the Senate, identifying many areas of waste and inefficiency. She has introduced bipartisan legislation to reform the congressional budget process, eliminate duplicative programs, and phase out unneeded and costly tax breaks for sugar growers and mining companies. She has also led efforts to eliminate exorbitant subsidies for powerful special interests like pharmaceutical and oil companies.

Senator Shaheen has a reputation for outstanding constituent services. She and her staff have successfully helped thousands of constituents navigate bureaucracy, avoid foreclosure, secure military commendations, receive delayed Social Security and Medicare assistance and access VA benefits, among many other services.

Shaheen served as Governor of New Hampshire from 1997 to 2003. During her time in the statehouse, she helped create nearly 67,000 new jobs while keeping New Hampshire's tax burden the lowest in the country. With bipartisan support, she expanded public kindergarten to thousands of families and made higher education more affordable with a tax free college savings program.

Between her time as Governor and election to the U.S. Senate, Shaheen served as the Director of Harvard University's Institute of Politics at the Kennedy School of Government.

Shaheen was born in Saint Charles, Missouri. Her father worked his way up to a management position in a shoe factory and her mother worked as a secretary in their local church. After attending public schools, Shaheen received a bachelor's degree from Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania and a master's degree from the University of Mississippi. She and her husband, Bill, live in Madbury and have three daughters, Stefany, Stacey and Molly, and seven grandchildren.

Cory Booker
New Jersey
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Cory Booker

Cory Booker believes that the American dream isn't real for anyone unless it's within reach of everyone. Cory has dedicated his life to fighting for those who have been left out, left behind, or left without a voice.

Cory grew up in northern New Jersey and received his undergraduate and master’s degree from Stanford University. At Stanford, Cory played varsity football, volunteered for the campus peer counseling center, and wrote for the student newspaper. He was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship and went on to study at the University of Oxford, and then Yale Law School, where he graduated in 1997.

Cory moved to Newark after law school and started a nonprofit organization to provide legal services for low-income families, helping tenants take on slumlords. In 1998, Cory moved into “Brick Towers” in Newark, which eventually became a housing project. Cory lived there until the housing project was demolished in 2006.

Cory still lives in Newark's Central Ward today, where he sees first-hand many of the challenges he's working to solve in Congress, such as lack of access to affordable health care, environmental injustice, food insecurity, and our broken criminal justice system.

At 29, Cory was elected to the Newark City Council, where he challenged the city’s entrenched political machine and fought to increase economic security for city residents, expand access to health care, and improve public safety.

Cory served as Newark mayor from 2006 until 2013. During his tenure, the city experienced economic growth on a scale not seen since the 1960s. In addition, under Cory’s leadership, overall crime declined, affordable housing and green spaces massively expanded, city services were made more efficient, and educational opportunities increased. 

In October 2013, Cory won a special election to represent New Jersey in the United States Senate. In November 2014, he was re-elected to a full six-year term.

As New Jersey’s junior Senator, Cory Booker has brought an innovative and consensus-building approach to tackling some of the most difficult problems facing New Jersey and our country. He has emerged as a national leader in the effort to fix our broken criminal justice system and end mass incarceration, helping craft the most sweeping set of criminal justice reforms in a generation, the First Step Act, which became law in December 2018. He has also advocated for economic policy that expands opportunity, increases wages, limits corporate concentration, and cracks down on corporate practices like outsourcing, stock buybacks, and no-poach agreements that firms use to keep wages down. And he has been a leader in the Senate in the fight to protect the Affordable Care Act, while also championing proposals to build upon the law, increase access to care, and lower costs.

Cory sits on the Judiciary Committee, the Foreign Relations Committee, the Environment and Public Works Committee, and the Small Business Committee.

Chuck Schumer
New York
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Chuck Schumer

U.S. Senator Charles Ellis “Chuck” Schumer has dedicated his career to being a tireless fighter for New York. He visits all 62 counties every year and has delivered countless large and small victories across the state, including delivering $20 billion to rebuild after the 9-11 terror attacks and passing a $63 billion relief package to help New York recover from Superstorm Sandy. From massive snowstorms in Western New York to numerous floods across Upstate, Sen. Schumer has been there to deliver aid and support to New Yorkers in their time of need.

From authoring a permanent tax credit to offset the rising costs of college tuition, protecting Social Security and Medicare to encouraging job-creating infrastructure projects, Senator Schumer has made it a hallmark of his career to protect the middle class and those working to reach it – including finding common sense solutions to national issues.

Chuck was born and raised in Brooklyn, NY, where his dad owned a small exterminating business and his mom was a housewife. He attended public school and graduated from James Madison High School before heading to Harvard University, and then Harvard Law School. Chuck has two daughters, Jessica and Alison, and he still resides in Brooklyn with his wife, Iris Weinshall.

After graduating from Harvard Law School in 1974, Chuck was elected to the New York State Assembly, where he soon made his mark with his trademark vigor and relentless advocacy. In 1980, at 29, Chuck was elected as a congressman from the 9th Congressional District.

Chuck represented the 9th CD in Brooklyn and Queens for eighteen years, where he established his reputation as a consumer advocate and a pioneer in the fight against crime during the days of sky-high crime and murder rates that plagued communities throughout America. He was the leading sponsor of the Violence Against Women Act, which combats domestic violence and sexual assault, and the Brady Bill, which instituted mandatory background checks for handgun purchases. He championed the Hate Crimes Prevention Act, which organized data on crimes of bigotry and allowed federal authorities to prosecute these crimes. He also sponsored legislation that required banks and credit card companies to provide greater disclosure to consumers.

In 1998, Chuck was elected to the U.S. Senate; he became New York's senior senator when Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan retired in 2000. Chuck kicked off his first Senate term by announcing he would visit each of New York's 62 counties every year, a tradition he continues today to keep in touch with voters from every corner of the state.

Throughout his time in the Senate, Chuck has made improving New York's economy his top priority, bringing affordable air service, like JetBlue, to Upstate New York. He has worked to successfully retain New York jobs that were at risk of leaving and to attract many new firms to New York to create many thousands of family-supporting new jobs. Chuck was the author of legislation that eliminated barriers that delay low-cost generic medications from entering the marketplace and led the charge to make college tuition tax deductible. He also aggressively championed agricultural measures to preserve vital market support programs for New York’s dairy farmers and crop growers. In 2013, Chuck worked across the aisle to pass a comprehensive immigration reform package, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act, which passed the Senate with overwhelming bipartisan support.

After New Yorkers re-elected him in 2004, Chuck secured two powerful posts: a seat on the Senate Finance Committee, which oversees the nation’s tax, trade, social security and healthcare legislation, and the Chairmanship of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC). Chuck successfully led the DSCC for two consecutive cycles and greatly expanded the number of seats in his conference.

Following the elections of 2006, then-Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) appointed Chuck to serve as Vice Chair of the Democratic Conference, the number three position on the Democratic Leadership team. In 2016, Chuck was once again re-elected by the people of New York and at the same time, his colleagues elected him to serve as Leader of the Democratic Caucus, the first time a New York Senator has held the position.

Rob Portman
Ohio
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Rob Portman

Rob Portman is a United States Senator from the state of Ohio, a position he has held since he was first elected in 2010, running a campaign that focused on common-sense conservative ideas to help create jobs and get the deficit under control. Rob won with a margin of 57 to 39 percent, winning 82 of Ohio’s 88 counties. In 2016, he was re-elected, winning by an even larger margin of 58 to 37 percent and winning 84 out of Ohio’s 88 counties. 

Rob was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he still lives today with his wife, Jane. Together they have three children: Jed, Will, and Sally. Rob grew up in a small-business family, where he learned early on the value of hard work, leadership, and fiscal responsibility. When Rob was young, his dad, Bill Portman, borrowed money to start Portman Equipment Company, where Rob and his brother and sister all worked while growing up. His father, and then his brother, built the family business from a small forklift truck dealership with five employees, with Rob's mom as the bookkeeper, to one that employed more than 300 people. Rob became a lawyer and developed his own private practice, representing Portman Equipment Company and other small businesses. 

In 1993, Rob was first elected to Congress, where he represented the diverse, seven county Second District in southern Ohio. He was proud to serve the Second District for 12 years, and in seven elections, he never received less than 70 percent of the vote. 

During his time in the House, Rob earned a reputation as a serious leader who focused on results. In September 1996, Rob founded the Coalition for a Drug-Free Greater Cincinnati, now known as PreventionFIRST!, to help keep young people from substance abuse.  He authored the Drug-Free Communities Act, which has provided more than $1 billion to community coalitions around the country in its more than two decades as law of the land. 

Rob also authored several federal laws to increase retirement savings, reform the IRS, and add more than 50 new taxpayer rights, curb unfunded mandates, reduce taxes, and expand land conservation efforts. He also authored the original Second Chance Act with the late-Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones in 2005, and it was later signed into law in 2008. Since 2009, more than 850 Second Chance Act grant awards have been made to government agencies and nonprofit organizations from 49 states for reentry programs serving adults and juveniles. More than 164,000 individuals have participated in these programs. Ohio has received more than $39 million in Second Chance Act grants. 

In 2005, Rob left Congress when he was asked to serve as the United States Trade Representative, the Cabinet-level official responsible for implementing and enforcing U.S. trade policy. As America’s Trade Representative, Rob was successful in reducing barriers to U.S. exports and increasing enforcement of trade laws to help level the playing field for American farmers, workers, and service providers. Under his leadership, American exports increased and the U.S. brought successful legal challenges against international trade law violations—including against China.

Following his accomplishments as Trade Representative, Rob was asked to serve in another Cabinet post, this time as Director of the Office of Management and Budget. Rob made his mark by proposing a balanced budget, fighting irresponsible earmarks, and putting in place new transparency measures for all federal spending. 

During his Senate tenure, Rob has introduced more than 240 bills, including 200 bipartisan bills, and more than 150 of his legislative priorities have been signed into law.

Rob has continued the work he started in the House to combat addiction. In 2016, the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, bipartisan legislation he authored, was signed into law. It provides resources for evidence-based prevention, treatment, and—for the first time in federal law—recovery programs to combat addiction. In 2018, the STOP Act, bipartisan legislation he authored, became law as part of larger opioid legislation. The STOP Act closes the loophole in our international mail screening that overseas drug traffickers have exploited to ship dangerous synthetic drugs like fentanyl and carfentanil into the United States. 

Rob is the co-founder and co-chair of the Senate Caucus to End Human Trafficking. He is the author of five federal anti-trafficking laws signed by President Obama and has long championed efforts to stop sex trafficking. He also authored the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act (SESTA), which was signed into law by President Trump in 2018. SESTA was the result of a bipartisan investigation into Backpage.com, which culminated in a bipartisan report exposing the company for knowingly facilitating criminal sex trafficking of vulnerable women and young girls and covering up evidence of these crimes in order to increase its own profits. SESTA allows victims to get the justice they deserve and allows prosecutors to hold websites accountable for knowingly facilitating criminal sex trafficking. 

Rob has continued fighting to expand U.S. exports and crack down on unfair and illegal imports. He co-authored the bipartisan Leveling the Playing Field Act, which was signed into law by President Obama and gives the federal government better tools to fight unfair imports. He also authored the ENFORCE Act, which President Obama signed into law and helps the federal government crackdown on countries like China that try to evade our trade laws. Rob also been a staunch advocate for Ohio jobs in dozens of cases at the International Trade Commission. He has supported cases involving solar products in Toledo, agriculture products like wheat grown throughout the state, specialty paper in Dayton, rebar in Cincinnati and Marion, hot-rolled steel in Cleveland, high-density pipe in Columbus, roller bearings in Canton, and others. 

In June 2019, Portman introduced the Carbon Capture Improvement Act, which would help power plants and industrial facilities finance the purchase and installation of carbon capture and storage equipment, allowing states like Ohio to continue to utilize our natural resources while protecting our environment at the same time. Specifically, this bill would allow businesses to use private activity bonds (PABs) issued by local or state governments to finance a carbon capture project, storing carbon dioxide that would have otherwise been emitted into the atmosphere.

As co-founder and co-chair of the bipartisan Senate Career and Technical Education (CTE) Caucus, Rob is working to align the 21st century education system with the 21st century workforce. His bipartisan Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Act was signed into law in 2018 to allow states and localities to use Perkins grant funding to establish CTE-focused academies and promote partnerships between local businesses, regional industries, and other community stakeholders to create work-based learning opportunities for students. He also authored the CAREER Act, federal law that helps Ohioans train for and find the jobs that are available today. 

Rob is a member of the Senate Finance Committee, the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, the Committee on Foreign Relations, and the Joint Economic Committee. He is also Chairman of the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations.

Jack Reed
Rhode Island
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Jack Reed

Jack was born and raised in Cranston and grew up on Pontiac Avenue.  His father, Joe, was a World War II veteran and Cranston school janitor who worked his way up to become custodial supervisor of the city's school system.  His mother, Mary, was a homemaker who was unable to go to college herself, but made sure her three children studied hard and had the opportunity to pursue a higher education.  The Reed family benefited from the GI Bill – a program that helped countless veterans further their education and put a roof over their heads – and Jack’s parents instilled in him the importance of serving his country and giving back to his community.

Jack grew up attending St. Matthew's Elementary School in Cranston and graduated from La Salle Academy in Providence.  He was nominated for an appointment to the United States Military Academy by U.S. Senator John O. Pastore.  On July 3, 1967, Reed reported to West Point to begin cadet training.  After graduating from the Military Academy in 1971 near the top of his class and receiving an active duty commission in the Army, Reed earned a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.  Reed also went on to earn a law degree from Harvard Law School in 1982.

One of the highest honors and greatest privileges of Jack’s life was commanding his fellow soldiers.  He served in the 82nd Airborne Division as an Infantry Platoon Leader, a Company Commander, and a Battalion Staff Officer.  He eventually joined the faculty at West Point, teaching cadets about economics and international relations as an Associate Professor within the Department of Social Sciences.  He served as a professor at the U.S. Military Academy until August of 1979 when he resigned from active duty as a Captain.  He continued serving in the U.S. Army Reserves until June of 1991, when he left the Reserves with the rank of Major.  Over the course of his military career, he earned the Army Commendation Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Ranger Tab, Senior Parachutist Badge, and Expert Infantry Badge.

After graduating from law school, Jack became an attorney in private practice, first working as an associate with the law firm of Sutherland, Asbill, & Brennan before moving back to Providence and working for the firm of Edwards & Angell.  He specialized in banking and securities law.

When Jack was young, he dreamed of being an architect or a soldier.  On November 7, 1960, as he stood with his classmates and teachers along Elmwood Avenue in Cranston, Jack watched as then-Senator John F. Kennedy - who was campaigning to become President - and then-candidate Claiborne Pell - who was running to become Rhode Island’s U.S. Senator - drove by his school.  Jack never imagined that one day he’d have the opportunity to serve alongside Kennedy’s brother and succeed Claiborne Pell in the United States Senate. 

Reed served three terms in the Rhode Island State Senate, where he focused on housing, children’s welfare, and mental health issues.  The people of Rhode Island then elected him to serve three terms in the U.S. House of Representatives.  As Rhode Island Monthly put it: “Since he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1990, Reed has been known as the hardest of workers who tirelessly researches issues and keeps himself in the know.  His knowledge ranges far and wide, foreign and local.”

In 1996, the people of Rhode Island elected Jack Reed to succeed Claiborne Pell as Rhode Island's 46th United States Senator.

Senator Reed works every day to help make the federal government more efficient, effective, and responsive to the people of Rhode Island.  He has a proven record of working on a bipartisan basis to help solve problems and achieve results.  Senator Reed was part of the bipartisan working group that drafted the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act and successfully led efforts to create the $150 billion Coronavirus Relief Fund to help states combat COVID-19.  Senator Reed also helped include a $1.25 billion small state minimum to ensure Rhode Island could effectively respond to the pandemic.

As one of just eight Senators in U.S. history to graduate from West Point, Time magazine noted: “Reed is a serious, intellectually honest veteran and an expert on defense issues in the Senate,” and the New York Times describes him as “a quiet deal-maker respected by colleagues in both parties.”

A senior member of the powerful Appropriations Committee, which controls the funding of the federal government, Senator Reed has been described by the Boston Globe as “a relentless advocate for his home state.”  As Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing, and Urban Development, he works tirelessly to direct federal funding to the Ocean State to create jobs, strengthen its infrastructure, and support economic and community development initiatives.

He has supported clean water projects to ensure both a healthy economy and a healthy environment.  And he authored a trio of laws to improve children’s health care and ensure our youngest patients get the help they need when they need it: the Childhood Cancer Survivorship, Treatment, Access, and Research (STAR) Act to advance pediatric cancer research and child-focused cancer treatments, improve childhood cancer surveillance, and provide resources for survivors and those impacted by childhood cancer; the Trauma Care Systems Planning and Development Act to establish critical care networks nationwide so that more paramedics and first responders can get trauma care patients to the right doctor at the right time; and the Better Pharmaceuticals and Devices for Children Act (BPDCA) to help ensure drugs and medical devices are specifically tested, labeled, and proven to be safe and effective for children.

Senator Reed has led efforts to strengthen Rhode Island’s transportation network – from expanding the runway at T.F. Green Airport to increasing capacity at our ports – in order to bring more jobs and businesses to Rhode Island and better link our state to the global economy.

Reed also serves as Ranking Member of the Armed Services Committee, where he has played a pivotal role in safeguarding our nation.  In 2002, he voted against giving President George W. Bush the authority to go to war in Iraq because it was an ill-planned diversion from the war on terrorism.  But he has always worked across the aisle to support our troops, and was instrumental in convincing Defense Secretary Robert Gates to continue serving in the Obama Administration and implement the plan to withdraw forces from Iraq.

Rhode Island’s defense industry is critical to national security and our state’s economy, and Senator Reed has been a leader at the federal level in growing Rhode Island’s defense sector and bringing resources to the state.  Thanks to his efforts on the Armed Services and Appropriations Committees, coupled with Rhode Island’s talented defense workers, the U.S. Navy plans to begin building the next generation of submarines in the Ocean State, creating thousands of new, good-paying jobs in Rhode Island in the coming years.

As a senior member of the Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee, Reed authored several key pieces of the historic Wall Street reform law and has been nationally recognized for his dedication to protecting U.S. consumers.  When taxpayers were forced to invest in banks to save the economy from total collapse, Jack Reed wrote the law ensuring that taxpayers would share in the rewards when the banks recovered.  As a direct result of Reed’s provision, taxpayers have earned nearly $10 billion in additional dividends – money that would have otherwise been kept by the rescued banks.

He also helped create the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to give American families the tools to fight unfair and abusive financial products and services, as well as a new Office of Financial Research (OFR) that will help provide early warnings to regulators about future financial problems.

Additionally, he authored laws to create a new affordable rental housing trust fund, improve consumer disclosures on mortgages, and address the needs of middle-class families who have struggled with the fallout from the housing crisis.

Senator Reed has been a leading voice on college affordability and student loan debt issues.  He helped write laws preventing interest rate increases on new loans to millions of college students, and fought efforts to increase student borrowing costs.  He recently proposed a Student Loan Borrowers Bill of Rights and has offered legislation to reform disclosure and servicing standards for both federal and private student loans.

And to help get our country back to full employment, he wrote a work-sharing law that provides an estimated $500 million for business-state partnerships to help prevent layoffs.  Nationwide, Reed’s law has been credited with saving more than 130,000 jobs since 2012, including over 1,000 in Rhode Island.

Today, Jack Reed continues to utilize the lessons he learned growing up in Cranston, which were deepened in the Army and tested in the halls of Congress, to stand up and speak out for the hard-working families who are the heart and soul of our country.

Mark Warner
Virginia
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Mark Warner

Senator Warner was elected to the U.S. Senate in November 2008 and reelected to a second term in November 2014. He serves on the Senate Finance, Banking, Budget, and Rules Committees as well as the Select Committee on Intelligence, where he is the Vice Chairman. During his time in the Senate, Senator Warner has established himself as a bipartisan leader who has worked with Republicans and Democrats alike to cut red tape, increase government performance and accountability, and promote private sector innovation and job creation. Senator Warner has been recognized as a national leader in fighting for our military men and women and veterans, and in working to find bipartisan, balanced solutions to address our country's debt and deficit.

From 2002 to 2006, he served as Governor of Virginia.  When he left office in 2006, Virginia was ranked as the best state for business, the best managed state, and the best state in which to receive a public education.

The first in his family to graduate from college, Mark Warner spent 20 years as a successful technology and business leader in Virginia before entering public office. An early investor in the cellular telephone business, he co-founded the company that became Nextel and invested in hundreds of start-up technology companies that created tens of thousands of jobs.

Senator Warner and his wife Lisa Collis live in Alexandria, Virginia. They have three daughters.

UA House Allies

Don Young
Alaska-At Large
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Don Young

Congressman Don Young was re-elected to the 116th Congress in 2018 to serve his 24rd term as Alaska’s only Representative to the United States House of Representatives. First sworn in as a freshman to the 93rd Congress after winning a special election on March 6, 1973, Congressman Young is today the Dean of the House and the longest serving member of the current Congress. 

Congressman Young served as Chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee from 1995 to 2001 and then as the Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee from 2001-2007.  In the 110th Congress, Representative Young returned to the helm of the Resources Committee to lead his fellow Republicans as the Ranking Member. In the 112th Congress, he was chosen to serve as the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Indian, Insular and Alaska Native Affairs (IIANA) – a position he held until January 2017. After fulfilling a successful 6-year term as Chairman of the IIANA Subcommittee, Congressman Young was named Chairman Emeritus of the full House Committee on Natural Resources – a role that allows him to bring his years of experience and knowledge to all five of the panel’s Subcommittees. Today, Congressman Young currently serves as the most senior Republican on both the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and House Natural Resources Committee.

Congressman Young calls Fort Yukon, Alaska home; a remote village of approximately 700 people located 7 miles above the Arctic Circle in Alaska’s central interior region.  Born on June 9, 1933 in Meridian, California, he earned his associate degree at Yuba Junior College in 1952, and his bachelor’s degree in teaching at Chico State College in 1958.  Between earning these degrees, he served in the US Army’s 41st Tank Battalion from 1955 to 1957.

When he first moved to Alaska, Congressman Young made a living in construction and tried his hand at commercial fishing, trapping, and in the search for gold.  In Fort Yukon he taught in a 25-student, 5th grade elementary class in the Bureau of Indian Affairs school. Constructed of logs, the school had a wood stove that kept his Alaska Native students warm in the sub-freezing, arctic winter. With the annual spring break-up of the river ice, he captained his own tug and barge operation to deliver products and supplies to villages along the Yukon River.  Even today, he remains the only licensed mariner in Congress. 

It was in Fort Yukon that Rep. Young met and married a young bookkeeper named Lu.  Lu was always at the Congressman’s side and supported him throughout his public service career.  Lu and Don were married for 46 years.  They were blessed with and raised two daughters, Joni and Dawn, and 14 grandchildren.  Mrs. Young passed away on August 2, 2009. Although Congressman Young never imagined finding love again, on June 9, 2015 he married Anne Garland Walton, a Fairbanks-area flight nurse and proud mother of two children and six grandchildren. 

Congressman Young first entered public service in 1964 when he was elected Mayor of Fort Yukon.  Two years later, Alaskan voters elected him to the State Legislature in Juneau where he served in the State House from 1966 to 1970, and later in the State Senate from 1970 to 1973.  Just hours after being sworn in to United States House of Representatives in 1973, he found himself leading the historic battle for approval of the Trans-Alaskan Pipeline. Often citing this as the single most important achievement in his career, Congressman Young stated, “Next to statehood itself, the most historical legislation passed that affected every Alaskan then, now, and in the future, was the passage of the pipeline legislation.”

That same year, his colleagues honored him as the “Freshman Congressman of the Year.”  He went on to gain a key appointment on the then Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee where he pushed through the 200-mile fishing limit critical to Alaska’s fishing industry.  He fought against federal control of lands and resources to which Alaskans are rightfully entitled – a battle he continues today with the same vigor.  In 1997, he passed by a 419 to 1 vote, the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act, which sets guidelines and priority uses within our nation’s 550-plus wildlife refuges.

Congressman Young proudly serves as the “Congressman for All Alaska” and loves his role as the only Alaskan Representative in Congress.  Renewed by the challenges and goals of the 116th Congress and his committee positions, Congressman Young will continue to champion legislation and funding for programs benefiting Alaska and the nation.  His vision remains the same – to provide citizens with the opportunity for a better life not just for today, but also for tomorrow and the future.

Terri Sewell
Alabama-7
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Terri Sewell

Congresswoman Terri A. Sewell is in her fifth term representing Alabama’s 7th Congressional District. She is one of the first women elected to Congress from Alabama in her own right and is the first black woman to ever serve in the Alabama Congressional delegation.

Congresswoman Sewell sits on the exclusive House Ways and Means Committee and brings to the committee her more than 15 years of experience as a securities and public finance attorney.  Currently, in the 116th Congress, she serves as Vice-Chair of the House Ways & Means Committee where she sits on three subcommittees: the Subcommittee on Health; the Subcommittee on Trade; and the Subcommittee on Worker and Family Support.

Congresswoman Sewell was also selected to serve on the distinguished House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence charged with the oversight of our national security. She is currently the Chairwoman of the Subcommittee on Defense Intelligence and Warfighter Support, charged with the oversight of collection and timely dissemination of Department of Defense intelligence with respect to support of all military operations. 

In her short time in Congress, Sewell has held several leadership positions including Freshman Class President in the 112th Congress.  In the 116th Congress, she was selected by the Democratic Whip James Clyburn to serve as a Chief Deputy Whip, and sits on the prestigious Steering and Policy Committee, which sets the policy direction of the Democratic Caucus.

Congresswoman Sewell is a member of the Congressional Black Caucus where she is Co-Chair of the Voting Rights Task Force.  She is a Vice Chair of the New Democrat Coalition; Co-Chair of the Congressional Voting Rights Caucus; Vice-Chair of the Congressional HBCU Caucus; and Co-Chair of the Rural Caucus. 

Congresswoman Sewell is an outspoken advocate for jobs creation, workforce development, skills training and for providing resources and economic opportunities for her constituents in the 7th Congressional District. In addition to pursuing job-creating legislation in Congress, Sewell has implemented a results-driven approach to addressing the unemployment crisis by hosting an Annual Job Fair and job readiness workshops across the district as a part of a workforce initiative called Project R.E.A.D.Y.--- Realizing Everyone’s Ability to Develop Yourself.

As the Member of Congress representing Alabama’s civil rights district, Congresswoman Sewell has been a passionate champion for recognizing and honoring the sacrifices of those freedom fighters who served as powerful agents of change.  Congresswoman Sewell was honored that her first piece of successful legislation recognized the “Four Little Girls” who tragically lost their lives during the bombing of the16th Street Baptist Church in 1963.  The Congressional Gold Medal is the highest civilian honor Congress can bestow. The bill passed unanimously in both houses of Congress and was signed into law by President Barack Obama on May 24, 2013 in a signing ceremony in the Oval Office to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the church bombing.   

In March of 2015, Congresswoman Sewell welcomed the world to her hometown of Selma during the 50th Anniversary of the March from Selma to Montgomery including President and Mrs. Obama; President and Mrs. George W. Bush and more than 100 members of Congress.  Sewell’s second Congressional Gold Medal bill to honor the Foot Soldiers of the Voting Rights Movement was signed by President Obama on March 7, 2015, the 50th Anniversary of Bloody Sunday.

Prior to her election in 2010, Congresswoman Sewell was the first black woman partner in the Birmingham law office of Maynard, Cooper & Gale, P.C., where she distinguished herself as one of the only black public finance lawyers in the State of Alabama.   A proud product of Alabama’s rural Black Belt, Congresswoman Sewell was the first black valedictorian of Selma High School. She is an honors graduate of Princeton University and Oxford University and received her law degree from Harvard Law School.

Congresswoman Sewell is a Silver Star and life member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.  She is the daughter of the late Coach Andrew A. Sewell of Selma, AL and retired librarian Nancy Gardner Sewell, Selma’s first black City Councilwoman, the 18th South Eastern Regional Director and former Supreme Grammateus of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Tom O'Halleran
Arizona-1
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Tom O'Halleran

Growing up, Tom O'Halleran was taught the value of hard work and honesty in serving his community. He took these lessons and joined the Chicago Police Department where he was commissioned as one of the youngest homicide detectives in the city's history. He served with distinction, receiving countless commendations and awards for his work to serve and protect his community.

Following his service, Tom became a member of the Chicago Board of Trade and opened his own small business. As a member of the board of directors, he chaired the finance, floor operations, and planning committees. His work gave the Board of Trade a vision for the future.

Never one to rest, Tom took on public service once again upon retiring to Arizona. He served three consecutive terms in the Arizona House of Representatives and one term in the Senate. Tom used his eight years in the legislature to take on tough challenges and make the right decisions for his constituents, regardless of the political implications. For Tom, it is, and will always be, about the people he serves, not party or title.

Tom and his wife, Pat, live in unincorporated Yavapai County outside the Village of Oak Creek. They celebrated their 50th anniversary in 2019 and have three children and four grandchildren.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi
California-12
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Speaker Nancy Pelosi

Nancy Pelosi is the 52nd Speaker of the House of Representatives, having made history in 2007 when she was elected the first woman to serve as Speaker of the House. Now in her third term as Speaker, Pelosi made history again in January 2019 when she regained her position second-in-line to the presidency, the first person to do so in more than 60 years.  As Speaker, Pelosi is fighting For The People, working to lower health care costs, increase workers’ pay through strong economic growth and rebuilding America, and clean up corruption for make Washington work for all.

For 31 years, Speaker Pelosi has represented San Francisco, California’s 12th District, in Congress.  She has led House Democrats for 16 years and previously served as House Democratic Whip.  In 2013, she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame at a ceremony in Seneca Falls, the birthplace of the American women’s rights movement.

Under the leadership of Pelosi, the 111th Congress was heralded as “one of the most productive Congresses in history” by Congressional scholar Norman Ornstein. President Barack Obama called Speaker Pelosi “an extraordinary leader for the American people,” and the Christian Science Monitor wrote: “…make no mistake: Nancy Pelosi is the most powerful woman in American politics and the most powerful House Speaker since Sam Rayburn a half century ago.”

Working in partnership with President Obama, Speaker Pelosi led House passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in early 2009 to create and save millions of American jobs, provide relief for American families, and provide a tax cut to 95 percent of working Americans. With the House Democratic Caucus, Pelosi continues to focus on the need to create jobs in America and prevent them from being shipped overseas.

Speaker Pelosi was the architect of the landmark Affordable Care Act which has guaranteed protections for all Americans with pre-existing medical conditions, ended annual and lifetime limits on health coverage, and provided affordable health coverage for tens of millions more Americans while lowering health care costs over the long term.

In the 111th Congress, Speaker Pelosi also led the Congress in passing strong Wall Street reforms to rein in big banks and protect consumers as well as the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act, which expands educational opportunities and reforms the financial aid system to save billions of taxpayers’ dollars. Additional key legislation passed into law included the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act to restore the ability of women and all workers to access our judicial system to fight pay discrimination; legislation to provide health care for 11 million American children; national service legislation; and hate crimes legislation. In late 2010, Pelosi led the Congress in passing child nutrition and food safety legislation as well as repealing the discriminatory “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy, which prohibited gays and lesbians from serving openly in the military.

As Speaker, Pelosi has made the climate crisis her flagship issue, enacting comprehensive energy legislation in 2007 that raised vehicle fuel efficiency standards for the first time in 32 years and making an historic commitment to American home grown biofuels. In 2009, under her leadership, the House passed the landmark American Clean Energy and Security Act – a comprehensive bill to create clean energy jobs, combat the climate crisis, and transition America to a clean energy economy. The legislation was blocked by Republicans in the United States Senate, but sent a strong signal to the world about the United States’ commitment to fighting the climate crisis.

A leader on the environment at home and abroad, Pelosi secured passage of the “Pelosi amendment” in 1989, now a global tool to assess the potential environmental impacts of development. In San Francisco, Pelosi was the architect of legislation to create the Presidio Trust and transform the former military post into an urban national park.

In continuing to push for accountability and transparency in government, under Speaker Pelosi, the House passed the toughest ethics reform legislation in the history of the Congress, including the creation of an independent ethics panel, and increased accountability and transparency in House operations, including earmark reforms. As Speaker, Pelosi led the fight to pass the DISCLOSE Act in the House, which fights a corporate takeover of U.S. elections and ensures additional disclosure; she continues to fight for this legislation today.

Additional key accomplishments signed into law under the leadership of Speaker Pelosi include: an increase in the minimum wage for the first time in 10 years; the largest college aid expansion since the GI bill; a new GI education bill for veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars; and increased services for veterans, caregivers, and the Veterans Administration.

As House Democratic Leader, Pelosi wrested critical legislative victories out of the GOP majority. In the 114th Congress, she spearheaded a historic bipartisan agreement to strengthen Medicare, ending the cycle of expensive “Doc Fix” patches and transitioning away from a volume-based system toward one that rewards value, ensures the accuracy of payments and improves the quality of care. Following the Iran Nuclear Agreement, Leader Pelosi orchestrated the effort that secured the votes to uphold a possible Presidential veto of Republicans’ effort to disapprove the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

Pelosi’s strength at the negotiating table has consistently delivered significant funding increases for key Democratic priorities. In the FY 2016 omnibus, Pelosi won the permanent authorization of the World Trade Center Health Program and a massive five-year extension of expiring wind and solar renewable energy tax credits. In the FY 2018 omnibus, Pelosi won significant increases in vital domestic investments, including a $3.2 billion increase in opioid epidemic funding, a $3 billion increase for NIH medical research, and the largest single year funding increase for Child Care Development Block Grants in the initiative’s history.

In the face of the all out-Republican onslaught against Americans’ health care, Leader Pelosi held House Democrats united through dozens of votes to repeal or undermine the Affordable Care Act – mobilizing a massive nationwide campaign to block House Republicans’ monstrous “Trumpcare” legislation. Under her leadership, House Democrats also unanimously opposed the GOP tax scam for the rich.

Pelosi comes from a strong family tradition of public service. Her late father, Thomas D’Alesandro Jr., served as Mayor of Baltimore for 12 years, after representing the city for five terms in Congress. Her brother, Thomas D’Alesandro III, also served as Mayor of Baltimore. She graduated from Trinity College in Washington, D.C. She and her husband, Paul Pelosi, a native of San Francisco, have five grown children and nine grandchildren.

Jim Costa
California-16
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Jim Costa

Jim Costa represents California’s 16th Congressional District. He has served the San Joaquin Valley in the U.S. House of Representatives since January of 2005. Raised on a dairy farm in Fresno’s Kearney Park area, Congressman Costa is a third-generation family farmer. As a Member of Congress, Costa has applied his farming background to fighting for Valley water, agriculture, and the economy.

A lifelong resident of the Valley, Costa’s committee assignments allow him to effectively advocate for the district. Costa uses his position on the Natural Resources Committee to fight for the Valley’s fair share of water. This includes securing funding for dams, working to overturn unfair federal water regulations, and increasing Valley water allocations. On the Agriculture Committee, Costa has worked to increase federal support for Valley agriculture through the Farm Bill and other programs. When a milk price crisis devastated the region’s dairy industry, Costa introduced legislation to protect Valley dairy families and local jobs. In addition to his committee assignments, Costa is a member of the fiscally-conservative Blue Dog Coalition and has worked with his colleagues to support more responsible budgeting practices.

Costa’s work to improve the Valley stretches across the district. During his first term in office, Costa put together a broad-based bipartisan coalition aimed at developing a Regional Water Plan for Central California.  He also led the negotiations between the City of Fresno and the State of California that secured the final funding necessary to complete the new Amtrak station in Fresno.  During the 109th Congress, Costa played a leading role in the bipartisan effort to secure Highway 99 funding in the infrastructure bonds approved by California voters in 2006.  Costa was also a principal in the successful effort to secure Congressional approval of plans to keep Fresno's 144th Air National Guard Fighter Wing viable well into the future.  As the primary author of state legislation to create the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District, Costa continues to work with local and state officials to clean up the Valley's air.

Costa’s efforts to strengthen Valley agriculture and the economy have been recognized by organizations like The American Farm Bureau Federation who named him a recipient of its "Friend of the Farm Bureau" award. Costa has also received the "Spirit of Enterprise" award by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Costa’s work to crack down on violent crime and advocate for victims’ rights was recognized by the National Organization for Victim Assistance, which named him recipient of the Donald E. Santarelli Public Policy Award for demonstrating outstanding public policy leadership.

A product of Fresno County schools, Costa is a graduate of San Joaquin Memorial High School and has a Bachelor's Degree in Political Science from California State University, Fresno. Before being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, Costa served for 24 years in the California State Legislature.

Pete Aguilar
California-31
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Pete Aguilar

Pete Aguilar represents the 31st Congressional District of California. He was most recently re-elected in 2018 and serves on the House Appropriations Committee. In the 116th Congress, Rep. Aguilar holds the leadership positions of Whip of the New Democrat Coalition and Chief Deputy Whip in the House Democratic Caucus. 

Raising his family in the community his family has called home for four generations, Representative Aguilar understands the challenges that Inland Empire families face today.  He started his first job at the age of twelve, working with his grandfather at the San Bernardino County Courthouse cafeteria. He then put himself through college with the assistance of student loans and federal grants, and later established a life in public service to give back to his community.

Representative Aguilar is a voice for middle-class families throughout San Bernardino County and prioritizes legislation that will nurture a more fair economy, where everyone has the opportunity to succeed. He is committed to policies that create jobs, support our students, reform our broken immigration system, and safeguard vital programs for seniors and veterans.

Representative Aguilar previously served as the Mayor of Redlands, where he earned a reputation for his bipartisanship and steadfast commitment to making his community a better place to live, work, and raise a family. He resides in Redlands with his wife Alisha and their two sons.  

Norma Torres
California-35
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Norma Torres

Congresswoman Norma J. Torres represents California's 35th Congressional District in the Inland Empire which includes Bloomington, Chino, Fontana, Montclair, Ontario, Pomona, and Rialto. She previously served as a State Senator, Assembly Member, and as a Mayor and Council Member in the City of Pomona. Throughout her career in elected office, she has worked to make government more responsive to the needs of Inland Empire residents.

As State Senator, Torres played a significant role in making the Affordable Care Act work for California’s patients and consumers.  Her law to diversify the Covered California Board so that it would be better prepared to enroll the uninsured, earned her statewide recognition and national attention.  As Chair of the Committee on Housing and Community Development, she led an effort that secured $2 billion in federal funds for the “Keep Your Home California” program, which helped thousands of families keep their homes during the foreclosure crisis.  Fighting crime and making sure public safety systems are responsive to the needs of the community has been a lifelong priority for Torres. As a former 9-1-1 dispatcher, she drew on her expertise to author a law that modernized the 9-1-1 system—resulting in a system that now routes cell phone callers to their local police department, rather than a statewide hotline, during an emergency.

Now on her third term in Congress, Torres currently serves on the powerful House Appropriations and Rules Committees. The Appropriations Committee is responsible for appropriating all federal spending, domestic and abroad. As a member of the Rules Committee, she helps determine the consideration of all legislation on the House floor.

Previously, she served on the Foreign Affairs, Homeland Security, and Natural Resources Committees. As a member of the Foreign Affairs Committee, Torres worked to address the root causes of migration from Central America and has fought to ensure accountability and transparency for U.S. funds spent abroad. Notably, her amendment to require the Secretary of State to send Congress a list of corrupt officials in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala was adopted in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 and signed into law.

On the Homeland Security Committee, she worked to tackle the many serious national security challenges facing the nation. In the committee, Torres prioritized the need to address cybersecurity risks at the nation’s ports. Specifically, at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, where most of goods imported traverse the Inland Empire. In October 2018, her Strengthening Cybersecurity Information Sharing and Coordination in Our Ports Act was passed into law as part of the five-year reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration.

Torres also served on the Natural Resources Committee, where she championed initiatives that would strengthen Indian’s Country’s ability to become more self-sufficient and address the disturbing increase in murdered and missing Native American women. Her amendment to the National Landslide Preparedness Act that addresses increased risk of landslides and flooding due to wildfires passed in the House.

Torres immigrated to the United States from Guatemala at age five and is a longtime resident of the Inland Empire.  She resides in Pomona with her husband Louis, and their two sons Robert and Matthew. Her third son, Christopher, is an Air Force veteran. Torres received her bachelor’s degree in Labor Studies from the National Labor College in Silver Spring, Maryland.

Raul Ruiz
California-36
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Raul Ruiz

U.S. Representative Raul Ruiz, M.D., grew up in the community of Coachella, California, where both of his parents were farmworkers.

Dr. Ruiz achieved his lifelong dream of becoming a physician through public education. After graduating from Coachella Valley High School, Dr. Ruiz graduated magna cum laude from UCLA. He went on to Harvard University, where he earned his Medical Degree, as well as a Masters of Public Policy from the Kennedy School of Government and a Masters of Public Health from the School of Public Health, becoming the first Latino to earn three graduate degrees from Harvard University. He completed his Residency in Emergency Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh and a Fellowship in International Emergency Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. During his training, Dr. Ruiz served as a consultant to the Ministries of Health of both Serbia and El Salvador.

Dr. Ruiz returned home after completing his medical training and began working as an Emergency Room doctor at Eisenhower Medical Center. Recognizing the physician shortage crisis in the Coachella Valley, Dr. Ruiz started a pre-medical mentorship program for young aspiring doctors, which has grown to include over 100 local students.

The program became part of the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine, where Dr. Ruiz served as a Senior Associate Dean. Through the group Volunteers in Medicine, he helped to open a free clinic to help underserved communities in the Coachella Valley.

In 2010, Dr. Ruiz started the Coachella Valley Healthcare Initiative, which brought together stakeholders from across the region to address the local healthcare crisis. He has also worked internationally in the medical community. In 2010, Dr. Ruiz flew to Haiti immediately following the 2010 earthquake and served as the Medical Director for the J/P Haitian Relief Organization. The U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne awarded him the Commanders Award for Public Service for his work.

Dr. Ruiz continued his work as an Emergency Room Doctor until he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2012. He represents California’s 36th District, which includes the entire Coachella Valley, as well as the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Blythe, Hemet and San Jacinto. He resides in Palm Desert, CA.

Dr. Ruiz currently serves on the House Energy and Commerce Committee. 

Katie Porter
California-45
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Katie Porter

Congresswoman Katie Porter represents California’s 45th Congressional District.

In Washington, Congresswoman Porter has remained committed to putting Orange County families first. As a member of House Financial Services Committee and the House Oversight and Reform Committee, she’s asked tough questions of bank CEOs and administration officials to hold them accountable to the American people. She has also been a key supporter of legislation to reduce the influence of dark money in politics and restore ethics to Washington.

As a single working mom, Rep. Porter knows firsthand about the challenges faced by working families. She’s introduced bipartisan legislation to allow families to set aside more pre-tax income for dependent care. She’s continued to press for a repeal of the limits on the State and Local Tax (SALT) deduction, which has hit California’s middle-class families especially hard.

Before coming to Congress, Porter spent nearly two decades taking on the special interests that dominate American politics and drown out the voices of working families. As California’s independent watchdog against the banks, she made sure the big banks that had cheated Orange County homeowners followed through on their promise to help affected families get back on their feet. As a consumer finance expert, Congresswoman Porter also helped Congress pass the original Credit CARD Act in 2009, which enacted federal protections from abusive credit card fees.

Mike Thompson
California-5
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Mike Thompson

Mike Thompson represents California's 5th Congressional District. The district includes all of Napa and parts of Contra Costa, Lake, Solano and Sonoma Counties. He was first elected in 1998. Prior to serving in Congress, Thompson represented California's 2nd District in the California State Senate, where he chaired the powerful Budget Committee.

Thompson is a member of the House Committee on Ways and Means and serves as Chairman of the Select Revenue Measures Subcommittee and as a senior member of the Health Subcommittee.

Thompson is the co-founder and co-chair of the bipartisan Congressional Wine Caucus, which consists of over 215 U.S. Senators and Representatives. He is a member and was twice co-chair of the Congressional Sportsmen's Caucus. He is also a member of the Blue Dog Coalition, which is composed of Democrats committed to bipartisan problem solving and fiscal responsibility.

In 1990, Thompson was the first Vietnam veteran elected to the California State Senate. He served in combat with the U.S. Army as a staff sergeant/platoon leader with the 173rd Airborne Brigade where he was wounded and received a Purple Heart. He was also an instructor at the Army's Airborne School.

Thompson is recognized in Congress and throughout his district as a strong leader for Democratic principles who has built a solid reputation for bipartisan problem solving.

Thompson’s number one priority in Congress is to create jobs and grow our economy. He has co-authored numerous pieces of legislation to improve our nation’s infrastructure, boost our renewable energy economy, and better our education system.

As Co-Chair of the bipartisan Military Veterans Caucus, he led the effort to improve treatment options for servicemembers suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. He has authored bills to help veterans find work as they make the transition back to civilian life. And, as someone who went to college on the GI Bill himself, he helped lead the effort in Congress to pass the 21st Century GI Bill. 

With a national debt of more than $17 trillion, Thompson is working on a balanced approach to get our fiscal house in order that includes creating jobs, cutting spending, asking everyone to pay their fair share, and requiring Congress to pay for the bills it passes.  

In the wake of the school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, Thompson was named Chair of the House Gun Violence Prevention Task Force. Thompson is a hunter, gun owner and strong supporter of the Second Amendment. He also believes that Congress should do more to reduce gun violence. In February of 2013, Thompson’s task force released a comprehensive set of policy principles that will reduce gun violence and respect the Second Amendment, including expanding the criminal background check system to all commercial firearm sales.

Thompson is the husband of a family nurse practitioner. He knows firsthand of the challenges that exist in our health care system. That is why he voted to pass the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and is working to build on the reforms made in the ACA to further improve everyone’s access to affordable, quality health care.

Thompson is the co-author of comprehensive immigration reform. He also has worked to ensure equal rights for same sex couples, and has co-authored legislation that gives state and local law enforcement the tools to prosecute hate crimes based on sexual orientation. As a combat veteran, Thompson worked to end the discriminatory policy of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

Thompson is a small vineyard owner and was the maintenance supervisor for the Beringer Winery. He has taught Public Administration and State Government at San Francisco State University and California State University, Chico. He received his Master’s of Public Administration from California State University, Chico.

He is married to Janet Thompson. They have two sons, a firefighter and a deputy sheriff, and three wonderful granddaughters.

Diana DeGette
Colorado-1
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Diana DeGette

Rep. Diana DeGette is a fourth-generation Coloradoan who has dedicated her life to serving the people of Colorado’s First Congressional District.

Now in her twelfth term, DeGette is recognized as a leading voice in the nation’s ongoing health care debate. As the chair of a key oversight panel, DeGette is responsible for overseeing some of our nation’s most important federal agencies – including the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

In her role as chair of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce's Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, DeGette has quickly become a leading figure in holding the Trump administration accountable for its shameful policy of separating undocumented families at the border, ensuring the EPA is properly enforcing the nation’s environmental laws, and lowering the cost of insulin for the millions of Americans who rely on it every day.

Rep. DeGette believes Congress has a responsibility to make health care more accessible and affordable for all Americans. Among her Congressional colleagues, DeGette is seen as a leading expert on cutting-edge scientific research, including the use of human embryonic stem cells.

In 2005, DeGette authored the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act to overturn the restrictions President George W. Bush put in place to prohibit the use of embryonic stem cells for research purposes. While Congress voted twice to approve DeGette’s legislation, President Bush vetoed it both times. In March 2009, President Obama included the language from DeGette’s bill in an executive order he signed to reverse the restrictions.

In addition to expanding the use of stem cell research, DeGette has been instrumental in expanding the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), which provides health insurance to low-income children. She also played a key role in drafting the Affordable Care Act, which President Obama signed into law in 2010.

Despite her many accomplishments, the one piece of legislation DeGette is best known for championing is the 21st Century Cures Act, which has modernized the nation’s medical research system. The bill, known simply as the Cures Act, has been widely hailed as one of the most important pieces of legislation that Congress has passed in recent years. From cancer research to precision medicine, it has enabled more labs to make more breakthrough discoveries that could soon lead to new cures and treatments for patients around the world.

In 2007, DeGette successfully brokered a deal to enact tough new standards to protect Americans from lead in drinking water. She also played a key role in the effort to ban phthalates, a dangerous chemical which is harmful to children. And, as chair of the subcommittee that’s responsible for overseeing the FDA, DeGette is leading the charge to protect our nation’s food supply.

Even in times of intense political division, DeGette has shown an ability to reach across the aisle to get results for the people of her district.

In 2017, DeGette was honored by the Javits Foundation for her renowned commitment to cooperation and collaboration across party lines.

In 2018, the U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress awarded DeGette with its Statesmanship award for her efforts to pass legislation in a collaborative and bipartisan manner.

A fourth generation Coloradan and a lifelong Denverite, DeGette is a graduate of Denver’s South High School. She earned her B.A, magna cum laude, from Colorado College in 1979; and a J.D. from New York University School of Law in 1982.

Before serving in the U.S. House of Representatives, DeGette served two terms in the Colorado House, including one term as Assistant Minority Leader from 1993-1995.

In 1996, after two terms in the state legislature, DeGette was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives where she continues to serve the people of Colorado’s 1st Congressional District.

DeGette is married to Lino Lipinsky. They have two daughters, a son-in-law, and a dog named Charlie.

Joe Neguse
Colorado-2
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Joe Neguse

Congressman Joe Neguse represents Colorado’s 2nd District in the U.S. House of Representatives. He was elected to his first term in November 2018, becoming the first African-American member of Congress in Colorado history. He serves as a member of the House Judiciary Committee, House Natural Resources Committee and the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis.

Rep. Neguse was elected by his colleagues to serve as Co-Freshman Representative to Leadership in the 116th Congress, and in that capacity serves as a member of the House Democratic Leadership Team. He also serves as one of the Congressional Progressive Caucus Vice Chairs and Liaison to New Members. In 2020, he was recognized as the most bipartisan member of Colorado’s congressional delegation by the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University, and received the “Spirit of Service” award from the Town Hall Project for his successful Service Town Hall initiative. During his tenure, he’s introduced more legislation than any freshman lawmaker in the country, and has had more legislation signed into law by the President than any member of Colorado’s congressional delegation. 

Before his election, he served in the Governor of Colorado's Cabinet as the Executive Director of Colorado's consumer protection agency. As one of the youngest people to serve as a state-Cabinet secretary at age 31, he achieved key victories, including the recovery of millions of dollars for consumers, investigations culminating in significant financial-fraud cases, the championing of legislation to combat financial fraud against seniors, and the launch of the state’s first online filing system for civil rights discrimination complaints.   

Previously Rep. Neguse was elected to represent Colorado’s 2nd District on the University of Colorado Board of Regents, where he served a six-year term fighting to make higher education more affordable and accessible and building consensus on tough issues, including efforts to lower student health insurance costs, increase wages for the University’s lowest paid workers and make voter registration more accessible to students. He also worked in the Colorado House of Representatives and co-founded New Era Colorado, the state’s largest youth voter registration and mobilization non-profit. He received his B.S. in Political Science and Economics from the University of Colorado-Boulder, where he graduated summa cum laude, and received his J.D. from the University of Colorado School of Law. 

Over 40 years ago, Rep. Neguse’s parents immigrated to the United States from Eritrea. As hardworking immigrants and naturalized citizens, they never forgot nor took for granted the freedom and opportunities the United States gave them and their children. Their experience motivated Rep. Neguse to be an active participant in our democracy at an early age, and to give back through public service. Rep. Neguse's public service is rooted in his firm belief that we should be expanding—not restricting—opportunities for all Americans, and he has spent his career doing the same. His priorities in Congress include lowering health care costs and prescription drug prices, raising workers’ wages, ensuring greater accountability in government, protecting our treasured public lands, and fighting the existential threat of climate change.

Rep. Neguse and his wife Andrea live in Lafayette, where they are raising their young daughter, Natalie. 

Joe Courtney
Connecticut-2
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Joe Courtney

Congressman Joe Courtney was elected in 2006 to represent the Second Congressional District of Connecticut in the House of Representatives. He serves on the House Armed Services Committee, and House Education and Labor Committee.

Congressman Courtney is the Chairman of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces. According to a review by House Historians Office, Courtney is the first known member from Connecticut to lead a naval oversight panel in the House of Representatives since 1873, when Stephen W. Kellogg of Waterbury served as Chair of the Committee on Expenditures in the Navy Department in the 42nd Congress (1871-1873). Prior to that, Samuel Ingham, a two-term Congressman with connections to Hebron, Jewett City (Griswold) and Essex, served as chair of the Committee on Navy Affairs in the 25th Congress (1837-1839).

In addition, he co-chairs the bipartisan Congressional Shipbuilding Caucus along with Rep. Rob Wittman of Virginia. As a member of the House Education and Labor Committee, he serves on the Health, Employment, Labor and Pensions subcommittee, as well as the Higher Education and Workforce Training subcommittee.

As a senior member of the Armed Services Committee, Congressman Courtney has worked to strengthen our nation's defense by leading the call for increased submarine production. When Courtney arrived in Congress, Electric Boat was facing significant workforce reductions, and, for the first time in 50 years, was not actively designing the next generation of submarine. Because of funding secured by Courtney through his committee work, the men and women of Electric Boat have been building two submarines per year since 2011. In addition, Courtney has secured critical resources for new design and engineering work on the replacement for the OHIO-class submarine, which has added thousands of jobs in southeastern Connecticut. This design and engineering work prompted Electric Boat to expand into the former Pfizer building in New London to accommodate its growing workforce.

Additionally, Congressman Courtney secured over $100 million federal funding outside the President's budget for SUBASE New London. This investment will ensure that New England's largest military installation will have an enduring mission for years to come. In recognition of his work, Courtney was awarded “The Distinguished Public Service Award” from Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, the highest civilian honor the Navy confers.

Since his swearing-in, Congressman Courtney has distinguished himself as a tireless advocate for both our nation's veterans and our men and women in uniform. He successfully fought to expand the Montgomery GI Bill for post-9/11 veterans and their families, and led the fight to extend TRICARE benefits to dependents under age 26. Congressman Courtney also fought and won support for an 18-unit supportive housing facility for homeless and at-risk veterans in Jewett City. He also partnered with Senator John McCain to introduce the Post-9/11 Troops to Teachers Enhancement Act to help members of the military transition into the teaching profession. In recognition of his efforts on behalf of veterans, Congressman Courtney has been awarded the Connecticut National Guard's highest honor, the Meritorious Service Award. He has also earned recognition from veterans organizations, including the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars, which named him Legislator of the Year in 2009.

Having served as a member of the House Agriculture Committee, Congressman Courtney is a vocal proponent for nearly 2,500 farmers across eastern Connecticut. Courtney is the founding co-chairman of the Congressional Dairy Farmers Caucus, and has worked tirelessly to protect family farms from foreclosure and fix the flawed milk pricing system.

Dedicated to preserving our green space and protecting the environment, Courtney introduced and won passage of a law that designated the Eightmile River in Connecticut as a part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Thanks to his efforts, this pristine and scenic watershed will be preserved for generations to come.

Before serving in the House of Representatives, Joe Courtney represented the citizens of Vernon in the Connecticut General Assembly from 1987 to 1994. During this tenure, then state-Rep. Courtney served as House Chairman for both the Public Health and Human Services Committees.

Courtney was recognized in a legislative poll in 1994 by Connecticut Magazine for his bipartisan efforts, and named the "Most Conscientious" and the "Democrat Most Admired by Republicans." Since he came to Congress, Courtney has received numerous awards from several national organizations including the National Patient Advocate Foundation's 2010 Healthcare Hero award, The International Brotherhood of Boilermakers' Legislator of the Year Award, and the American Farm Bureau's Friend of the Farm Bureau award.

Congressman Courtney is a 1975 graduate of Tufts University in Boston. He earned a law degree from the University of Connecticut School of Law in 1978. He lives in Vernon with his wife, Audrey Courtney, and their two children, Robert and Elizabeth.

Rosa DeLauro
Connecticut-3
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Rosa DeLauro

Rosa DeLauro is the Congresswoman from Connecticut’s Third Congressional District, which stretches from the Long Island Sound and New Haven, to the Naugatuck Valley and Waterbury. Rosa serves in the Democratic leadership as Co-Chair of the Democratic Steering and Policy Committee, and she is the Chair of the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Subcommittee, where she oversees our nation’s investments in education, health, and employment. Rosa also serves on the subcommittee responsible for the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, where she oversees food and drug safety.

At the core of Rosa’s work is her fight for America’s working families. Rosa believes that we must raise the nation’s minimum wage, give all employees access to paid sick days, allow employees to take paid family and medical leave, and ensure equal pay for equal work. Every day, Rosa fights for legislation that would give all working families an opportunity to succeed.

Rosa believes that our first priority must be to strengthen the economy and create good middle class jobs. She supports tax cuts for working and middle class families, fought to expand the Child Tax Credit to provide tax relief to millions of families, and introduced the Young Child Tax Credit to give families with young children an economic lift.

Rosa has also fought to stop trade agreements that lower wages and ships jobs overseas, while also protecting the rights of employees and unions. She believes that we need to grow our economy by making smart innovative investments in our infrastructure, which is why she introduced legislation to create a National Infrastructure bank.

Rosa is a leader in fighting to improve and expand federal support for child nutrition and for modernizing our food safety system. She believes that the U.S. should have one agency assigned the responsibility for food safety, rather than the 15 different agencies that lay claim to different parts of our food system. Rosa fights against special interests, like tobacco and e-cigarettes, which seek to skirt our public health and safety rules.

As the Chair dealing with appropriations for Labor, Health, Human Services, and Education, Rosa is determined to increase support for education and make college more affordable for more American students and their families. She is also fighting to protect the Affordable Care Act so that all Americans have access to affordable care. Rosa strongly believes in the power of biomedical research and she is working to increase funding so that we can make lifesaving breakthroughs in science and medicine.

Rosa believes that we have a moral obligation to our nation’s veterans and their families, and her concern for these heroes extends to both their physical and mental well-being. Rosa supports a transformation in how the Department of Veterans Affairs is funded, including advanced appropriations for health services, to ensure its fiscal soundness; and she successfully championed legislation to guarantee that troops deploying to combat theaters get the mental health screening they need both before and after deployment, as well as championed legislation that now provides assistance to today’s Post-9/11 veterans choosing to pursue on-the-job training and apprenticeship programs.

Rosa belongs to 62 House caucus groups and is the co-chair of the Baby Caucus, the Long Island Sound Caucus, and the Food Safety Caucus.

Soon after earning degrees from Marymount College and Columbia University, Rosa followed her parents’ footsteps into public service, serving as the first Executive Director of EMILY's List, a national organization dedicated to increasing the number of women in elected office; Executive Director of Countdown '87, the national campaign that successfully stopped U.S. military aid to the Nicaraguan Contras; and as Chief of Staff to U.S. Senator Christopher Dodd. In 1990, Rosa was elected to the House of Representatives, and she has served as the Congresswoman from Connecticut’s Third Congressional District ever since.

Rosa is married to Stanley Greenberg, President of Greenberg Quinlan Rosner, a public issues research firm. Their children—Anna, Kathryn, and Jonathan Greenberg—all are grown and pursuing careers. Rosa and Stan have six grandchildren, Rigby, Teo, Sadie, Jasper, Paola and Gus. 

Jahana Hayes
Connecticut-5
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Jahana Hayes

Jahana Hayes is the U.S. Representative for the Fifth Congressional District of Connecticut. Representative Hayes was elected to the United States House of Representatives in November 2018, making her the first African-American woman and the first African-American Democrat to ever represent the state of Connecticut in Congress.

Hayes first garnered widespread notoriety when she was selected as the Connecticut Teacher of the Year, before going on to earn the distinction of 2016 National Teacher of the Year (NTOY), leading to an invitation to the White House by President Barack Obama. In her capacity as NTOY, Hayes traveled the country and the world as an ambassador for public education engaging all stakeholders in policy discussions meant to improve outcomes for students.

Congresswoman Hayes’ story is one of achievement despite the odds and overcoming the obstacles that life can place before you. She has been quoted as saying that “education saved her life” and is a fierce advocate for ensuring that equitable access to educational opportunities exists for all students and families.

Congresswoman Hayes currently sits on the full House committees of Education and Labor, and Agriculture. Her subcommittee assignments include Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education, Civil Rights and Human Services, Livestock and Foreign Agriculture, Nutrition/Oversight and Department Operations. She is a member of the Congressional Black Caucus, Pro-Choice Caucus, Coalition for Autism Research and Education Caucus and Co-chair of the College Affordability Caucus. Congresswoman Hayes serves on the Emergency Task Force on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health, Education and Labor Task Force, Freshman Working Group on Addiction, Gun Violence Prevention Task Force and is a Deputy Whip.

Areas of legislative focus for Congresswoman Hayes are equitable access to quality education, affordable health care for everyone, labor, agriculture, and the environment. Additional priority areas include: immigration reform, gun violence prevention, veteran issues, social justice, transportation, and working in a bipartisan way to bring positive change to the lives of every person in our community.

Eleanor Holmes Norton
District of Columbia-At Large
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Eleanor Holmes Norton

Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, now in her fifteenth term as the Congresswoman for the District of Columbia, is the Chair of the House Subcommittee on Highways and Transit. She serves on two committees: the Committee on Oversight and Reform and the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

Before her congressional service, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to serve as the first woman to chair the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She came to Congress as a national figure who had been a civil rights and feminist leader, tenured professor of law, and board member at three Fortune 500 companies. Congresswoman Norton has been named one of the 100 most important American women in one survey and one of the most powerful women in Washington in another. The Congresswoman's work for full congressional voting representation and for full democracy for the people of the District of Columbia continues her lifelong struggle for universal human and civil rights.

Congresswoman Norton's accomplishments in breaking barriers for her disempowered district are matched by her success in bringing home unique economic benefits to her constituents. Among them are senatorial courtesy to recommend federal judges, the U.S. Attorney, and other significant federal law enforcement positions for the District; up to $10,000 per year for all D.C. high school graduates to attend any public U.S. college or university and up to $2,500 per year to many private colleges and universities; a unique $5,000 D.C. homebuyer tax credit, which has sharply increased home ownership in the District and was a major factor in stabilizing the city's population; and D.C. business tax incentives, including a significant wage credit for employing D.C. residents, which has maintained businesses and residents in the District.

Congresswoman Norton also has brought significant economic development to the District of Columbia throughout her service in Congress, creating and preserving jobs in D.C. The most significant are her work in bringing to D.C. the U.S. Department of Homeland Security headquarters compound, now under construction, and is the largest federal construction project in the country; her bill that is developing the 55 acre-Southeast Federal Center, the first private development on federal land; her work that resulted in the relocation of 6,000 jobs to the Washington Navy Yard; and her successful efforts to bring to the District the new headquarters for the U.S. Department of Transportation, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, along with an additional Metro station at New York Avenue, which has resulted in the development of the NOMA neighborhood.

Congresswoman Norton helped end the city's most serious financial crisis in a century, in the 1990's,by achieving a historic package that for the first time restructured the financial relationship between Congress and the District, by transferring $5 billion in unfunded pension liabilities and billions more in state costs to the federal government.

The Congresswoman, who taught law full time before being elected, is a tenured professor of law at Georgetown University, teaching an upper-class seminar there every year. After receiving her bachelor's degree from Antioch College in Ohio, she simultaneously earned her law degree and a master's degree in American Studies from Yale University. Yale Law School has awarded her the Citation of Merit for outstanding alumni, and Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences has awarded her the Wilbur Cross Medal for outstanding alumni, the highest awards conferred by each on alumni. She is the recipient of more than 50 honorary degrees.

Before being elected, Congresswoman Norton served as a trustee on a number of public service boards, including the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Board of Governors of the D.C. Bar Association, as well as served on the boards of civil rights and other national organizations.

The Congresswoman is a third-generation Washingtonian, and is the mother of John Holmes Norton and Katherine Felicia Norton.

Lisa Blunt Rochester
Delaware-At Large
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Lisa Blunt Rochester

Congresswoman Lisa Blunt Rochester represents Delaware in the U.S. House of Representatives and serves as an Assistant Whip for House Leadership. Lisa sits on the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. The committee has broad jurisdiction over health care, the environment, commerce and trade, energy policy, telecommunications, manufacturing, and consumer protection.
As the Energy and Commerce Committee’s only former statewide health official, Lisa understands health care from a number of different perspectives – as an implementer at the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services, negotiator while serving as State Personnel Director, and advocate as CEO of the Metropolitan Wilmington Urban League. Lisa is focused on reducing the cost of health care and prescription drugs for middle-class families, addressing the disparity in outcomes for communities of color, and tackling our nation’s opioid and addiction epidemic. She serves as a Member of the Bipartisan Heroin Task Force, comprised of more than 100 members united with the common goal of tackling opioid addiction.

Lisa is a leading voice in Congress on economic and future of work-related issues. As former Secretary of Labor and State Personnel Director, Lisa leverages her professional experience to advocate for legislation that boosts start-up business growth, removes barriers for citizens re-entering society, and addresses college affordability and ballooning student debt. She is a Co-Chair of the New Democrat Coalition’s Future of Work Task Force and serves as the sole Member of Congress on the Aspen Institute’s National Advisory Council for the Future of Work Initiative. She is also the founder of the Congressional Future of Work Caucus.

In the 115th Congress, Lisa was a member of the House Committee on Agriculture – the first Delawarean to serve on the committee in over 120 years. In this role, she helped craft the 2018 Farm Bill, which is a five-year re-authorization that extends U.S. Department of Agriculture programs related to the farm safety net; nutrition programs that feed children, seniors, people with disabilities, and families who rely on the social support programs; land-grant and 1890 universities; and agriculture research.

As a member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus and a strong proponent of reforming our criminal justice system, Lisa introduced first-in-the-nation legislation, the Clean Slate Act, sealing the federal records of former nonviolent offenders that remain crime-free and have earned a second chance. This bill would provide new opportunities for Americans to earn a good-paying job, pursue education and training, and rent or own a home. According to estimates by the Center for American Progress, the passage of the Clean Slate Act could boost the U.S. economy by as much as $87 billion per year.

With deep roots in the First State, Lisa grew up in Wilmington, graduated from Padua Academy, and worked her first job at the McDonald’s on Market Street. She graduated from Fairleigh Dickinson University with a degree in International Relations and put herself through graduate school as a working mom – earning a master’s degree in Urban Affairs and Public Policy from the University of Delaware.

Lisa began her distinguished career in public service as an intern and later Caseworker in a congressional office where she helped Delawareans with their Social Security benefits, disability insurance claims, IRS disputes, and housing needs. Lisa would go on to serve in the cabinets of two Delaware governors and as CEO of the Metropolitan Wilmington Urban League – an action-oriented, public policy research think-tank.

Lisa also served as the Senior Executive Leadership and Systems Manager for the Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston where she advocated for people with disabilities in their struggle for equal opportunity and civil rights. During this time, Lisa helped expand the Institute’s global footprint and advised state agencies and employers. In part due to Lisa’s work, she helped build the Institute into a fully-fledged college at the university, the School for Global Inclusion and Social Development — focused on the inclusion of all people.

Lisa currently resides in Wilmington, Delaware near her adult-aged children, Alex and Alyssa, as well as her daughter-in-law, Ebony.

Daniel Webster
Florida-11
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Daniel Webster

Daniel Webster, a family man and small-business owner, has dedicated himself to serving the citizens of Central Florida with honor and integrity. For nearly three decades, he has fought on behalf of Florida’s hardworking taxpayers and families to advance common-sense reforms and principled policy.

Webster served as the Speaker of the Florida House, “the first Republican Speaker in 122 years,” and Majority Leader in the Senate, working in these leadership roles to shake up the status quo in Florida and pass sweeping reforms that earned him widespread praise from the people of Florida.
From his first day in leadership, Webster worked to reform the way Legislature did business, requiring all proposed laws to meet specific criteria that would determine its effectiveness in benefiting the people of the great state of Florida.

His tenure as Chairman of the Florida Senate Judiciary Committee was monumental. Webster led Florida as the only state to pass a constitutional amendment protecting its citizens in the landmark Kelo Case (2005) dealing with property rights and government’s ability to condemn property.
With his engineering background, Webster is working on the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure where he applies nearly thirty-five years of transportation experience in Florida to create jobs, improve Florida’s roads and highways, and find ways to save money by eliminating fraud and abuse. 

In the 116th Congress, he will continue serving on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and on the House Committee on Natural Resources, as the Deputy Republican Leader.

Congressman Webster was born in Charleston, West Virginia on April 27, 1949.  He is a graduate of Georgia Tech where he earned his degree in Electrical Engineering in 1971.  He also holds two Honorary Doctorate Degrees. Webster is married to the former Sandra Jordan of Orlando, and they have six children: David, Brent, Jordan, Elizabeth, John, and Victoria, and eighteen grandchildren.  Webster is active in his church, First Baptist Church of Central Florida. Known for many things, Daniel Webster still holds his faith, his family, and his principles as his biggest assets.  

Charlie Crist
Florida-13
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Charlie Crist

Charlie Crist is honored to represent Florida’s 13th, the most beautiful congressional district in the country. The district covers Pinellas County from Clearwater down through St. Pete, where he grew up.

Charlie has spent his life’s work serving his fellow Floridians. He was elected to the Florida State Senate in 1992, where he championed environmental protection issues and public education. In 2000, after two terms in the Florida Senate, Charlie continued to push for education funding and better teacher pay as the state’s Education Commissioner. In 2002, he was elected Florida Attorney General, a role through which he fought for consumer protections, civil rights, and opportunities for at-risk youth.

Elected as Florida’s 44th Governor, Charlie furthered his commitment to public education, using federal stimulus funding to save thousands of teachers’ jobs. He continued to lead efforts to protect civil rights, taking action to automatically restore voting rights of non-violent ex-felons and to extend voting hours across the state for all Floridians.

In Congress, Charlie is committed to working in a nonpartisan manner to create jobs, increase wages, protect our beaches from climate change, honor our military and veterans, and protect the benefits seniors have earned. With his role on the prestigious House Appropriations Committee, he will fight to combat climate change, protect clean air and water, provide for a strong national defense, support our veterans, build better roads and bridges, and strengthen programs designed for those struggling to make ends meet.

No matter the issue, Charlie is dedicated to being the voice of the people – always putting the residents of Pinellas County above party lines.

Charlie resides in his hometown of St. Petersburg, Florida – “The Sunshine City.”

Debbie Wasserman Schultz
Florida-23
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Debbie Wasserman Schultz

Debbie Wasserman Schultz has dedicated her public life to serving South Floridians and standing up for justice, equality, and opportunity wherever and whenever it is threatened. As Florida’s first Jewish Congresswoman, she has earned the respect of her colleagues for working tirelessly on behalf of seniors, children, and families for nearly three decades.

First sworn in to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2005, Congresswoman Wasserman Schultz previously served in the Florida House of Representatives and Florida Senate where she originally displayed her philosophy that there is “no task too small, and no goal too big.”

Only two months after her arrival in Congress, Wasserman Schultz became a leading national voice in opposition to President George W. Bush’s involvement in the Terry Schiavo case. Facing a House of Representatives controlled by Republicans, she stood up for civil rights and defended the idea that “Congress is not the appropriate venue to decide end-of-life or any private, personal family dispute.”

Known for vigorously defending her progressive values, the Congresswoman has also demonstrated her ability to pass meaningful legislation in a bipartisan fashion. She teamed up with former Republican Senator Arlen Specter to write a resolution – passed unanimously by both houses of Congress and signed by President Bush – to declare May as Jewish American Heritage Month in an effort to reduce anti-Semitism, hate, and bigotry.

As a mother of three, Congresswoman Wasserman Schultz has worked to prioritize the safety and security of our nation’s youth. She authored the first federal pool and spa safety legislation – the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act. Since its passage in 2007, there have been no drain entrapment deaths in any public pools in the United States. That same year, she sponsored the PROTECT Our Children Act, which created the largest law enforcement effort ever formed for the protection of our nation’s youth.

After announcing her own battle with breast cancer in 2009, Wasserman Schultz introduced the EARLY Act, a piece of legislation designed to increase breast cancer education and awareness. The EARLY Act became law as part of the Affordable Care Act, signed by President Barack Obama in 2010. Wasserman Schultz also worked with Republican Congresswoman Renee Elmers to write and pass the PALS Act, which helps increase young women’s access to mammograms.

A leading advocate for women and girls, Congresswoman Wasserman Schultz introduced the Rape Survivor Child Custody Act to encourage more states to allow women to terminate the parental rights of a rapist, based on clear and convincing evidence. The bill was signed into law by President Obama in 2015.

Currently Wasserman Schultz serves as a Cardinal on the Appropriations Committee, making history as the first-ever woman to Chair the Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Subcommittee, where she is committed to ensuring our nation’s veterans have the resources and support they need. In addition, she serves on the Homeland Security Subcommittee, as well as the Energy and Water Subcommittee, where Wasserman Schultz is a leading advocate of the efforts to protect the Florida Everglades, take bold action on climate change, and safeguard our air and water.

In the 116th Congress, Wasserman Schultz also serves on the Committee on Oversight and Reform (COR), which has vast jurisdiction over the government and private sector, and plays a key role in overseeing the Trump Administration.  

As Chief Deputy Whip of the Democratic Caucus, Congresswoman Wasserman Schultz has the unique ability to work with and help lead her colleagues in support of a progressive policy agenda. She has been a tireless defender of Social Security and Medicare and is strongly committed to expanding access to quality and affordable health care, preventing senseless tragedies of gun violence, and defending the fundamental idea that all Americans have the right to be treated equally under the law.

Congresswoman Wasserman Schultz attended the University of Florida where she served as president of the Student Senate and graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science in 1988 and a Master’s Degree in 1990. She has been married to Steve Schultz for more than 20 years and together they have three children.

Wasserman Schultz has said that representing the people of Florida’s 23rd district is the greatest privilege of her professional life. A proud South Floridian who represents parts of Broward and Miami-Dade counties, Congresswoman Wasserman Schultz resides with her family in Weston.

Frederica Wilson
Florida-24
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Frederica Wilson

Congresswoman Frederica S. Wilson proudly represents Florida’s 24th Congressional District. It is one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse districts in the nation and includes parts of northwest Miami-Dade and southern Broward counties.   

Recognizing her record of service and productivity, in 2010 voters overwhelmingly elected her to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives. As a former educator, elementary school principal, community leader, school board member, state legislator, and founder of the 5000 Role Models of Excellence Project, Congresswoman Wilson earned a reputation as a “Voice for the Voiceless.”  Her tenure in Congress, now in its fourth term, also has been marked by her signature spirit of unrelenting advocacy on behalf of the less fortunate.

The Florida lawmaker has continued her mission to improve the quality of life for her constituency by creating jobs with dignity, improving education, stopping home foreclosures, safeguarding Medicare and Social Security, and strengthening ties with Haiti and the Caribbean. 

As the Ranking Democrat on the Education and Workforce Protections Subcommittee in the 114th Congress, Congresswoman Wilson introduced the American Jobs Act of 2013, an innovative bill that promotes full employment and boosts workforce development opportunities; the Student Loan Borrower Bill of Rights, which would provide vital relief to overburdened student loan borrowers; and the Youth Corp Act of 2013, which reconnects youth with education, the workforce and their communities. She has also sponsored legislation to reduce homeowners’ insurance premiums, protect foster children, and defend Haitian women against gender-based violence. In addition, the lawmaker, whose mantra is “Jobs, Jobs, Jobs,” hosted one of the state’s largest job fairs, which connected thousands of Floridians to more than 100 local and national employers.

Congresswoman Wilson is the founder of the Florida Ports Caucus, a bipartisan coalition formed to help pass the Water Resources Reform and Development Act. After being stalled for 12 years, the GOP-led Congress in a bipartisan vote passed the bill in 2014. As a result, her district was awarded billions of dollars in capital funding for major projects like the PortMiami Tunnel, which created thousands of jobs. It also highlighted the lawmaker’s ability to successfully work across party lines.

After earning a Bachelor of Science degree in elementary education from Fisk University and a Master of Science degree in elementary education from the University of Miami, Congresswoman Wilson worked as a teacher and assistant educational coordinator for the Miami-Dade County Public Schools Head Start program. She quickly rose to become principal of Skyway Elementary School, which was recognized as one of the best schools in America in President George H. W. Bush’s “America 2000” plan to upgrade national education standards.

She won seats in the Florida House of Representatives in 1998 and the state Senate in 2002, where her peers elected her Senate Minority Leader Pro Tempore and Minority Whip. The Florida lawmaker was considered the “Conscience of the Senate” based on her drive to improve life for low-income families and individuals. 

Born in Miami, Congresswoman Wilson learned the value of public service and community activism from her parents.  The late Beulah Finley Smith and the late Thirlee Smith, Sr., were small business owners and civil rights activists.  Her brother, the late Thirlee Smith, Jr., was the first full-time African American reporter at the Miami Herald and a long-time educator for Miami-Dade County Public Schools, who was responsible for implementing African-American history into the district’s curriculum. 

Congresswoman Wilson is widowed and the proud mother of three children: Nicole, LaKesha, and Paul – and has five beautiful grandchildren.

Mario Diaz-Balart
Florida-25
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Mario Diaz-Balart

Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart is currently fulfilling his 9th term in the U.S. House of Representatives, serving Florida’s 25th congressional district. Diaz-Balart is a senior member of the House Committee on Appropriations and is Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, in addition to serving on the Defense Subcommittee. He passionately serves his constituents, acting tirelessly in defense of individual rights and liberties, promoting economic prosperity, and supporting a strong national defense. He is well known for his advocacy of human rights and democracy around the world, as well as for his staunch support of our global allies.

Diaz-Balart was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2002 to represent Florida’s 25th Congressional district. Prior to his time in Congress, Diaz-Balart served 14 years in the Florida State Legislature in both chambers, House and Senate. He chaired a number of different committees, including the Combined Appropriations/Ways and Means/Finance and Tax Committee.

Diaz-Balart was born on September 25, 1961, in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida to Rafael and Hilda Diaz-Balart, and is the youngest of four brothers (Rafael, Lincoln, and Jose). He studied Political Science at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

Diaz-Balart currently resides in Miami, Florida with his wife, Tia, and son, Cristian Rafael.

Debbie Mucarsel-Powell
Florida-26
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Debbie Mucarsel-Powell

Like many Americans, Debbie Mucarsel-Powell immigrated to the United States from Ecuador as a young girl with her mother and sisters in search of better opportunities. She learned the struggles immigrants face at an early age when her mother worked double shifts while attending night school to learn English. At age 15, Debbie started helping her mother by working at a doughnut shop before school.

While working her way through high school and college, Debbie earned her Bachelor’s degree in political science from Pitzer College. She then gained her Master’s degree in International Political Economy from Claremont Graduate University while working as an office manager at a shipping company to make ends meet.

When she took her oath of office in 2019 to represent Florida’s 26th congressional district as the first Ecuadorian-American and first South American immigrant member of Congress, Debbie promised to protect and uphold the values that helped her succeed in America. After her father died in a senseless act of gun violence, Debbie became a strong advocate for gun safety legislation. She fights for universal background checks and a ban on assault rifles so that families don’t have to endure the tragedy hers did. Even before she was in sworn in, she became a member of the Gun Violence Prevention Task Force. From her first day, she has taken her place as a champion for gun safety, health care, immigration reform, the environment, and human rights.

Debbie stood out in the freshman class of the 116th Congress when she was appointed to the House Judiciary Committee, where she sits on the Immigration & Citizenship Subcommittee and Crime, Terrorism, & Homeland Security Subcommittee. She immediately got to work on the Judiciary Committee fighting for immigration reform and commonsense gun safety. She will use her position on the Judiciary Committee to fight for public safety and human rights everywhere.

Debbie also sits on the Transportation & Infrastructure Committee, where she advocates for South Florida on the Water Resources & Environment Subcommittee and Economic Development, Public Buildings, & Emergency Management Subcommittee. She is fighting for clean water and comprehensive responses to climate change.

Since her first day in Congress, Debbie has become a leading voice for regional stability in Latin America by advocating for the peaceful restoration of democracy in Venezuela.

Debbie spent years working at the College of Health at Florida International University, where she worked to grow programs that improve health care access for Floridians. In Congress, she will continue her fight to expand access to quality care and control skyrocketing costs. She believes we must continue to improve our health care system so families aren’t one medical bill away from bankruptcy.

Before becoming a member of Congress, Debbie worked for several non-profit organizations, including the Hope Center, Zoo Miami Foundation, and the Coral Restoration Foundation. She understands first-hand the immediacy of climate change, and the drastic actions we must take to invest in green energy, reduce carbon emissions, and protect South Florida from rising sea levels. She will fight for clean air and drinking water for all Floridians and restore the Everglades.

As a mother of three, Debbie is on the frontline, fighting for Florida’s families -- whether that is fighting this Administration’s family separation policy, prioritizing equal pay, keeping our planet clean for future generations, or supporting gun safety. Debbie is honored to serve her community of South Florida.

Donna Shalala
Florida-27
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Donna Shalala

Congresswoman Donna E. Shalala is proud to serve Florida’s 27th District as an advocate for women’s rights, civil rights, increased access to healthcare, better education and public schools, and a clean and sustainable environment. The longest-serving Secretary of Health and Human Services in U.S. history, she returns to Washington as the Representative for Florida’s 27th District, which includes the city of Miami and surrounding municipalities in Miami-Dade County.

The granddaughter of immigrants from Lebanon, Congresswoman Shalala was born in Cleveland, Ohio. She received her A.B. from Western College for Women and her Ph.D. from Syracuse University. A distinguished educator, she served as President of Hunter College of the City University of New York, Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin—Madison, and President of the University of Miami. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and has been elected to seven national academies, including the National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Education.

Congresswoman Shalala began her career in public service as one of the country’s first Peace Corps volunteers in Iran. In 1977, President Jimmy Carter tapped her to serve as the Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and Research at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

In 1993, Congresswoman Shalala was nominated by President Bill Clinton to serve as Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), where she created, implemented, and oversaw the Children’s Health Insurance Program, currently covering over 7.6 million children. She also succeeded in doubling the budget of the National Institute of Health and secured the highest immunization rates in American history. At the end of her eight-year tenure at HHS, a Washington Post article described her as “one of the most successful government managers of modern times.”

In 2007, President George W. Bush hand-picked her to co-chair with Senator Bob Dole the Commission on Care for Returning Wounded Warriors, tasked with evaluating how wounded service members transition from active duty to civilian life. In 2008, President Bush selected her as the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award. Congresswoman Shalala has been named one of “America’s Best Leaders” by U.S. News & World Report (2005), received the Nelson Mandela Award for Health and Human Rights (2010), was inducted into the National Woman’s Hall of Fame (2011), and has more than five dozen honorary degrees.

She is honored to serve Florida’s 27th District in the House of Representatives.

Stephanie Murphy
Florida-7
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Stephanie Murphy

U.S. Congresswoman Stephanie Murphy proudly represents Florida’s Seventh Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives. The district includes all of Seminole County and much of northern Orange County, including downtown Orlando, Maitland, Winter Park, and the University of Central Florida. She currently serves on the influential House Ways and Means Committee, where she is a member of the Subcommittee on Trade and the Subcommittee on Worker and Family Support.

Previously, Congresswoman Murphy was a businesswoman and college instructor after serving as a national security specialist in the Office of the U.S. Secretary of Defense where she received numerous awards for her distinguished service, including the Secretary of Defense Medal for Exceptional Civilian Service. She worked on a wide range of security issues from counterterrorism to foreign military relations to strategic planning for the department. Prior to her public service, Stephanie was a strategy consultant at Deloitte Consulting.

Congresswoman Murphy holds a M.S. in Foreign Service from Georgetown University and a B.A. in Economics from the College of William and Mary. She lives in Winter Park, Florida, with her husband and two young children.

Darren Soto
Florida-9
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Darren Soto

Elected in 2016, Darren Soto represents Central Florida in Congress. The 9th District includes all of Osceola and parts of Orange and Polk Counties, and is home to many of the people who make Orlando’s theme parks world-renowned, who grow more citrus and raise more cattle than anywhere else in the State, and who explore the farthest reaches of the galaxy from the Kennedy Space Center. 

Darren entered public service to work for these hard-working Floridians. Serving for a decade in the Florida Legislature, he fought to create high paying jobs, increase access to higher education, and ensure clean water, land, and air for his constituents. Soto passed landmark legislation protecting families of fallen firefighters, giving victims of sexual assault more time to report their attackers, and allowing Dreamers to be admitted to the Florida Bar. He also secured $25 million to build a state of the art college campus in the District, helped provide $10 million to save Florida’s springs, and brought in $15 million for a high-tech sensors manufacturing facility.

The first Floridian of Puerto Rican descent to serve in Congress, Darren is proud to represent all the diverse people of the 9th District. Soto graduated from Rutgers University and George Washington University School of Law. His hobbies include playing guitar, pastel painting, and kayaking.  Initially joining his local Orlando Young Democrats club to make friends, he was soon encouraged to run for the Florida House. At the age of 29, he ran, won, and has brought a sense of humility to public service ever since.

Sanford Bishop
Georgia-2
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Sanford Bishop

Congressman Sanford D. Bishop, Jr. is serving his fourteenth term in the U.S. House of Representatives, representing Georgia's Second Congressional District, which covers 29 middle and southwest Georgia counties: Bibb (in part), Baker, Calhoun, Chattahoochee, Clay, Crawford, Crisp, Decatur, Dooly, Dougherty, Early, Grady, Lee, Macon, Marion, Miller, Mitchell, Muscogee (in part), Peach, Quitman, Randolph, Seminole, Schley, Stewart, Sumter, Talbot, Taylor, Terrell, and Webster.

The middle and southwest Georgia legislator seeks to use the legislative process to create a higher, better quality of life for all citizens by promoting jobs and a stronger, more diversified economy, opportunities for rural areas, better education, safe and secure communities, a clean environment, affordable and accessible health care, sustainable agriculture, energy independence, and a strong national defense -- all within the context of a balanced budget.

Congressman Bishop is a leader among the fiscally responsible Democrats in Congress. He believes that the most important way the nation can reduce the federal budget deficit and grow the economy is to get Americans back to work. He endorsed legislation to increase small business lending, extend the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts to provide tax relief to Americans at all income levels while the economy recovers, eliminate the burdensome estate tax, and close tax loopholes that send American jobs overseas. In order to restore the nation’s economic security, Congressman Bishop has supported a Balanced Budget Constitutional Amendment; legislation to require any new spending by Congress to be offset by spending cuts and/or enhancing revenues; caps on discretionary spending; and reforming defense procurement and weapons acquisition.

Since 2003, Congressman Bishop has served on the House Committee on Appropriations. At the start of the 116th Congress, he was elected by his colleagues to serve as the Chairman Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee. He also serves as a senior member of the Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee and serves on the Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Subcommittee. As a Member of the House Appropriations Committee, Congressman Bishop has worked to ensure that the Second Congressional District gets its fair share of federal dollars to create and maintain jobs, rebuild its infrastructure, strengthen its schools, bridge the digital divide, fund innovative agriculture research, promote national security, and develop communities. Prior to 2003, Congressman Bishop served on the House Committee on Agriculture; the House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs; the House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service; and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. 

Congressman Bishop has spearheaded a wide range of initiatives that benefit the Second Congressional District. He has introduced the Disabled Veterans Tax Termination Act, which would permit retired service members who have a service-connected disability rated less than 50% to receive concurrent payment of both retired pay and veterans’ disability compensation. In the 112th Congress, he was the lead House sponsor of the Hiring Heroes Act, which improves programs helping individuals make the transition from service member to civilian employee. The measure was signed into law in November 2011 (P.L. 112-56). In the 111th Congress (2009-2010), Congressman Bishop successfully fought to prevent the U.S. Department of Transportation from banning peanuts on airlines. He also helped over 700 military spouses at Fort Benning keep their career advancement tuition assistance. 

In addition, Congressman Bishop was instrumental in securing estate tax relief. In 2009, he successfully fought for House passage of legislation to expand the Jimmy Carter National Historic Site in Plains, Georgia. He also worked to promote healthy eating and reduce obesity among the nation’s youth considering military service.

Congressman Bishop promotes the values and morals of Southwest Georgians – "God, country, work, family, and guns." He has co-sponsored amendments to the U.S. Constitution protecting the U.S. flag against acts of desecration; ensuring a balanced federal budget; and allowing voluntary, non-denominational prayer in schools and other public places. He also supports the Second Amendment, receiving the grade of “A+” from the National Rifle Association.

Congressman Bishop has pushed through many other initiatives of special concern to the Second District, including legislation to name the new U.S. Courthouse in Albany for civil rights leader C.B. King and legislation to rename the main post office in Albany for Dr. Walter Carl Gordon, Jr. He has supported bills to expand and improve the Andersonville Historic Site, as well as efforts to sustain and build new structures at the Second District's military installations, including Fort Benning and the Marine Corps Logistics Base (MCLB) in Albany. He supported the minting of a commemorative coin honoring the United States Army Infantry, and helped fund the construction of the National Infantry Museum and Soldier Center. Finally, he has secured more than a billion dollars in federal grants and loans for communities throughout the Second District, making the area one of the nation's leaders in qualifying for federal community development funding.

Bishop was born February 4, 1947, in Mobile, Alabama, and is the son of the late Dr. Sanford D. Bishop, Sr., the first president of Bishop State Community College in Mobile, Alabama, and Mrs. Minnie S. Bishop, a librarian. He is married to the Honorable Vivian Creighton Bishop, who serves as the elected Clerk of the Municipal Court of Columbus, Georgia (court administrator). They have a daughter, Aayesha J. Reese, and a granddaughter, Londyn.

Bishop graduated with his bachelors from Morehouse College in 1968 and with his law degree from Emory University Law School in 1971. In addition to these degrees, Morehouse awarded Bishop an honorary doctor of laws in 2010.  

He enlisted into the U.S. Army in 1969 and successfully completed basic training at Fort Benning, Georgia. He then enrolled in Advanced Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) training and later received an Honorable Discharge in 1971. He resided in Columbus, Georgia from 1972 to 1996, where he was the primary partner in the law firm of Bishop and Buckner, P.C. He is an Eagle Scout, a 33rd Degree Mason (PHA), a member of the Order of St. John, and a Shriner. He is a resident of Albany, Georgia, where he is a Deacon and Trustee of the Mount Zion Baptist Church.

Henry Johnson, Jr.
Georgia-4
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Henry Johnson, Jr.

Now serving his seventh term in the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia’s Fourth Congressional District – which encompasses parts of DeKalb, Gwinnett and Newton counties and all of Rockdale County – Congressman Hank Johnson has distinguished himself as a substantive, effective lawmaker and a leading national progressive voice.

Named one of the most effective Democrats in Congress by a University of Virginia and University of Vanderbilt study, Rep. Johnson has proven his ability to get things done.

In 2017 at the launch of the 115th Congress, Rep. Johnson landed a coveted seat on the Transportation & Infrastructure Committee (T&I). 

From his seat on the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Johnson has introduced, co-sponsored and passed legislation to level the playing field for everyday Americans. His bills that protect consumers and citizens’ civil liberties include the FAIR Act and the Stop Militarizing Law Enforcement Act.

As a champion for digital inclusion and an open Internet, Rep. Johnson has pushed to empower low-income and minority communities through digital rights, broadband access, and equality of opportunity online as ranking member of the subcommittee on Regulatory Reform, Commercial and Antitrust Law (RRCAL).  

In 2019, Rep. Johnson was elected by his peers to lead the Judiciary Subcommittee – Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet. The subcommittee has jurisdiction over administration of U.S. Courts, federal rules of evidence, civil and appellate procedure, judicial ethics, patent, copyright and trademark law, information technology and the Internet.

As a former member of the House Armed Services Committee, Rep. Johnson became a leading national voice for the demilitarization of local law enforcement agencies in 2014 after police donned camouflage tactical gear and climbed aboard heavily armored vehicles to confront peaceful protestors in the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, in the aftermath of the shooting death of an unarmed teenager. To help restore trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve, he filed the Police Accountability Act and the Grand Jury Reform Act in the wake of police shooting deaths of unarmed black men across the country.

In 2010, Rep. Johnson was a member of the prosecution team in the impeachment trial of New Orleans U.S. District Judge G. Thomas Porteous Jr., resulting in the first impeachment and conviction of a federal judge in more than two decades. In 2016, Rep. Johnson earned an honorary doctorate from his beloved alma mater Clark Atlanta University.

Prior to taking his seat in Congress in 2006, Rep. Johnson practiced criminal defense law in Georgia for twenty-seven (27) years. He served twelve (12) years as a magistrate judge, and five (5) years as a county commissioner.

Rep. Johnson is married to DeKalb County Commissioner Mereda Davis Johnson and has two adult children.

Lucy McBath
Georgia-6
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Lucy McBath

Representative Lucy McBath is a mom, a wife, an author, and an advocate.

On Black Friday in 2012, McBath’s son, Jordan Davis, was sitting in the back seat of a friend’s car at a gas station. A man pulled up next to them, complaining about the “loud music” they were playing. The man pulled out a gun and fired 10 shots into the car, hitting Jordan three times, and killing him. 

After Jordan’s death, McBath dedicated her life to preventing other families from experiencing the same pain she did.

McBath left her 30-year career as a flight attendant at Delta Airlines to become the national spokesperson and faith and outreach leader for Everytown for Gun Safety and Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America. 

In 2018, after the mass shooting that killed 17 high schoolers at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, McBath knew she had to stand up and run for Congress

Since taking her oath of office in January of 2019, McBath has sought bipartisan solutions to end gun violence, uplift small business and our economy, protect and serve our nation’s veterans, and lower the cost of health care and prescription drugs. 

A two-time breast cancer survivor, Representative McBath knows how important it is to protect those with pre-existing conditions and ensure all Americans have access to quality, affordable care. McBath has supported H.R. 1425, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Enhancement Act, a bipartisan bill to ensure that everyone with preexisting conditions is covered. McBath also introduced legislation requiring Medicare to cover hearings aids, and her bill was included in H.R. 3, the Lower Drug Costs Now Act. This landmark, bipartisan legislation would lower the cost of medication, stop big pharmaceutical companies from ripping off families, and reinvest billions in innovation and the search for new cures and treatments. 

McBath has also made protecting small businesses a priority, supporting legislation like the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act, which would strengthen the Paycheck Protection Program, provide more funding for SBA disaster lending, and ensure that more small businesses have access to the money they need.

In August of 2019, McBath’s bill, the HAVEN Act, which protects veterans in need, was signed into law by President Trump. The Washington Post called this bipartisan piece of legislation the “biggest bill passed” by a freshman this Congress. She has been called “an effective lawmaker” during her first year in Congress, and “one of the House Democratic Caucus’ most important voices.” 

To protect the education of our children, five measures led by McBath were included in the landmark Higher Education Act, a bill to improve the quality of education, lower the cost of college, and expand opportunity for students across America. 

McBath also led bipartisan legislation in December of 2019 to modernize data collection practices and improve epidemic preparedness at the Centers for Disease Control. In March, she secured the $500 million she requested as part of the COVID-19 relief package. 

In addition, she also successfully requested that $25 million in federal funds be allocated to the Centers for Disease Control and National Institutes of Health for gun violence prevention research, the first of its kind in twenty years.

Representative McBath has made securing federal funds for Georgia’s Sixth Congressional District a priority, helping obtain a $5 million grant to fund the Akers Mill ramp project in Cobb County, as well as supporting a grant to improve the safety and security of Temple Emanu-El in Sandy Springs, which was awarded in November of 2019.

The Congresswoman proudly represents Georgia’s Sixth Congressional District, but the most important title she will ever hold is Jordan’s Mom.

Ed Case
Hawaii-1
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Ed Case

U.S. Representative Ed Case proudly represents Hawaii's First Congressional District (O'ahu from Makapu'u through Central Honolulu and Leeward to Mililani, Waipahu, Ewa, Kapolei and Ko Olina).

Congressman Case previously represented Hawaii's Second Congressional District (Windward O'ahu, North Shore, Central O'ahu, Wai'anae, Neighbor Islands, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands) from 2002 to 2007. He also served as Hawai'i State Representative from 1994 to 2002 in various positions including Majority Leader.

Ed Case was born and raised in Hilo. His great grandparents on his father's side emigrated to Hawai'i in 1896 from Kansas and his family has lived on O'ahu, Maui, Kaua'i and Hawai'i Island over the generations since. His mother was born and raised in Missouri and met his father in Boston where she was attending college and he was attending law school.

Ed attended Waiakea-Kai and Keaukaha Elementary Schools in Hilo before graduating from Hawai'i Preparatory Academy in Kamuela. He went on to graduate from Williams College in Massachusetts before working on Capitol Hill for three years as legislative assistant to U.S. Representative/Senator Spark Matsunaga of Hawai'i.

Following this first of three DC tours, Congressman Case graduated from University of California/Hastings College of Law in San Francisco before returning to Hawai'i to serve initially as law clerk to Hawai'i Supreme Court Chief Justice William Richardson. He then joined the Honolulu-based law firm of Carlsmith Ball, Hawaii's oldest, where for two decades he practiced litigation, property, transactional, business and government law and rose from associate to partner and managing partner.

Following his initial service as U.S. Representative, Case practiced law for seven years with the Honolulu firm of Bays Lung Rose & Holma, where he also served as managing attorney. He then served for five years as Senior Vice President and Chief Legal Officer of Outrigger Enterprises Group, one of Hawaii's oldest hotel and resort companies with properties throughout Hawai'i and the Pacific-Asia-Indian Ocean region.

Case is married to Audrey (Nakamura), a sansei (third generation from Japan) whose Hawai'i roots are in Honolulu and Kona. Audrey was Ed's Hawai'i Prep classmate and worked for four decades as a flight attendant with Pan American and United. They have four children, a daughter-in law and now their first grandchild.

In his spare time ... Ed enjoys hiking and other outdoor and water activities, especially sailing and bodysurfing. Ed and Audrey also enjoy travel and family activities with a renewed emphasis on babysitting.

Mike Simpson
Idaho-2
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Mike Simpson

Michael (Mike) K. Simpson is serving his eleventh term in the House of Representatives for Idaho’s Second Congressional District.
Mike serves on the House Appropriations Committee. He is the Ranking Member for the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development. He also serves on the Interior and Environment Subcommittee. These committees have jurisdiction over funding for a number of programs critical to Idaho, including the Department of Energy, the Department of the Interior, the Forest Service, our National Parks, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Smithsonian Institute.  

Simpson is one of the House’s leading advocates for a new energy policy and a renewed commitment to research and development of improved nuclear energy technologies. Mike has also gained national attention for his bill to split the massive, overburdened 9th Circuit Court of Appeals as well as his Sawtooth National Recreation Area and Jerry Peak Wilderness Additions Act which addresses the concerns of economic growth and stability for rural Idaho and resolves long time wilderness debate over the Boulder-White Clouds and was signed into law in August of 2015. Simpson has long championed a fix to fire borrowing, having authored the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act. Simpson’s leadership led to the passage of the FY18 Omnibus Spending Bill that provided historic forest management reforms, most notably treating wildfires like other natural disasters.

His political career began in 1980, when he was elected to the Blackfoot City Council. In 1984, he was elected to the Idaho Legislature where he served until 1998, the last six years serving as Speaker.  Simpson was born in Burley, Idaho and raised in Blackfoot. He graduated from Utah State University and earned his DMD from Washington University School of Dental Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. After graduation, he joined his father and uncle at the Simpson Family Dental Practice in Blackfoot.

Simpson married his high school sweetheart, Kathy, and they have been married for almost 50 years. He is an avid golfer and reader who also enjoys painting and experiencing the exceptional scenery Idaho has to offer, with Kathy and their dog Charley.

Bobby Rush
Illinois-1
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Bobby Rush

From his very first year in office, Rush has focused on issues of importance to low- and middle-income families and communities.  In 1993, as a freshman in the 103rd Congress, Rush introduced bills on issues as diverse as Conflict Resolution and Mediation to Public Pensions and Community Development.

Rush’s track record of leadership on energy issues and his support for small business while serving as an alderman in the Chicago City Council paved the way for him to gain a seat on the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee in his second term.

Rush’s attention to detail in crafting national legislation inspired his peers to elect him Chairman of the House Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade and Consumer Protection during the 111th Congress.  Under Rush’s watch, important pieces of legislation became law including the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-314).  Signed into law by President George W. Bush, this statute is a landmark piece of legislation that provided an effective congressional response to an unprecedented wave of consumer product safety recalls in 2006 and 2007.

Key pieces of legislation that Rush crafted surrounding postpartum depression, women’s health (Sec. 2951 and Sec. 2952 of Subtitle L), and prescription drug offsets (Sec. 7101 and Sec. 7102 of Subtitle B) were adopted in the landmark Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (P.L. 111-148), signed into law by President Barack Obama.

Because of Rush’s leadership over the years on a range of small business issues and community-based lending, Rush was chosen to serve as a conferee as part of the final, bipartisan deliberative process that led to the passage of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (P.L. 111-203).  Rush fought hard to help ensure that low- and middle-income consumers would never again fall prey to the ill-conceived, predatory financial practices that led to the near epic collapse of U. S. financial markets in 2008.

In 1996, Rush served as a conferee on the Telecommunications Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-104).  This law, the first major overhaul of U.S. telecommunications law in almost 62 years, marked the first time the internet was included in the broadcasting spectrum allotment and paved the way for the growth of cable and internet accessibility throughout the nation.

During his tenure, Rush has brought more than one billion dollars to the 1st Congressional District.  Through his determined advocacy, he has led efforts to fund major infrastructure projects in the district such as the reconstruction of the Dan Ryan Expressway, the Lovana S. ‘Lou’ Jones/Bronzeville Metra Station, the CREATE Englewood Flyover, the CTA Red Line Reconstruction, and the CTA Red Line 95th Street Station Renovation.  Over the years, he has obtained millions of dollars in grants for libraries, museums, municipalities, police departments, hospitals, schools, and programs that support the arts.

As Chairman of the House Energy & Commerce Committee’s Energy Subcommittee, one of Rush’s top priorities has been to increase opportunities for minorities within all sectors of the energy industry.  In order to do so, Rush has introduced the 21st Century Energy Workforce Development Jobs Initiative Act (H.R. 338).  This bipartisan bill establishes a comprehensive program to improve the education and training of workers for energy-related jobs, with an emphasis on increasing the number of skilled minorities and women trained to work in such jobs.

Today, Rush continues to carve an effective course of sound legislative leadership that protects consumers, supports our military personnel, creates jobs, expands businesses, and promotes America’s national energy policy.  As Rush looks to the future, the needs and interests of the people he serves in the 1st Congressional District of Illinois remain front and center.

Brad Schneider
Illinois-10
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Brad Schneider

Brad Schneider represents Illinois’s 10th District in the United States House of Representatives, where he is serving his third term. He is a member of the House Committee on Ways and Means and House Committee on Small Business. He has previously served on the House Foreign Affairs and House Judiciary committees.

As a member of Congress, Brad is focused on building a thriving economy that works for all Americans, and ensuring every family has affordable health care, quality education and a rising standard of living.  He knows that our communities are stronger when small businesses invest and grow, our environment is healthy, and people are working together for a better future. 

Brad is committed to tackling the challenges we face as a nation, including protecting Medicare and Social Security for future generations, reforming our broken immigration system,  passing sensible gun safety legislation, and critically, urgently taking action to reduce the rate and address the impacts of global climate change. 

He is also a staunch advocate for the rights of women, including ensuring equal pay for equal work and protecting every woman’s right to make her own health care decisions about her body. Brad also favors extending federal civil rights protections to the LGBTQ community and was a strong supporter marriage equality long before he held public office.

Brad remains an influential voice on foreign affairs in Congress and believes our nation and world benefit when the United States exercises leadership and engages with the international community. A longtime proponent of a strong U.S.-Israel relationship, Brad consistently leads on efforts in Congress to promote cooperation on security, counter Iran’s nefarious influence, and condemn efforts to delegitimize the Jewish state.

Prior to being elected to Congress, Brad spent more than 20 years in business and management consulting, helping both large and family-owned businesses address the challenges of a changing economy and plan for the future.  His professional experience has allowed him to see first-hand the challenges small businesses face when trying to hire new workers and grow their company, as well as the effect thriving small businesses can have on a community’s overall well-being.

At home, Brad has deep ties to the community, including service with organizations such as the Jewish United Fund, the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, Waukegan Public Library Foundation, B.E.S.T., the Coalition to Reduce Recidivism, and the Civic Leadership Foundation.

Brad earned a BS in industrial engineering and his MBA from Northwestern University.

Brad and his wife, Julie, have been residents of Deerfield for almost 30 years, where they created a home, built their careers, and, most importantly, raised two sons, Adam and Daniel.

One of Brad’s favorite pastimes was coaching his sons’ baseball and soccer teams for over 12 years. He now enjoys exploring the bike trails throughout the district.

Mike Bost
Illinois-12
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Mike Bost

Rep. Mike Bost is proud to represent the 12 counties of Illinois’ 12th District in the U.S. House of Representatives.  Sworn into office on January 6, 2015, Mike is continuing the fight for our Southern Illinois’ values in Washington – a fight he began in U.S. military, then as a first responder, a local job creator, and a state representative.

In the 116th Congress, Rep. Bost serves on three key committees: Agriculture, Veterans’ Affairs, and Transportation & Infrastructure.  Mike also serves on the following Subcommittees: Commodities, Exchanges, Energy, and Credit;  and Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research under Agriculture; Oversight and Investigations, and as the lead Republican on Disability Assistance and Memorial Affairs under Veterans' Affairs; and Highways and Transit; Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials; Highways and Transit; and Water Resources and Environment under Transportation and Infrastructure.

Prior to his election to Congress, Rep. Bost served for two decades in the Illinois House of Representatives, rising to the leadership position of House Republican Caucus Chair.

Rep. Bost also served as a firefighter for the Murphysboro Fire Department.   He graduated from the University of Illinois' Certified Firefighter II Academy in 1993 and continued to serve the Murphysboro Fire Department during his six terms as state representative.  Prior to that, Rep. Bost worked for 13 years at Bost Trucking Service, first as a driver and then for 10 years as a truck manager.

Rep. Bost is a lifelong resident of Murphysboro.  He graduated from Murphysboro High School in 1979.   After high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps serving his country from 1979 to 1982.   He was trained as an electronic specialist and radar repairman and received an honorable discharge as a Corporal E-4. 

In addition to his duties as a Member of Congress, Rep. Bost is very active in his church and community.   Rep. Bost and his wife, Tracy, own and operate a small business – the White House Salon – in Murphysboro.

Mike and Tracy have three children – Steven, Kasey Fred and Kaitlin Rose.  They have two sons-in-law, Travis Fred and Chad Rose, a daughter-in-law, Betsy, and eleven grandchildren. 

Rodney Davis
Illinois-13
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Rodney Davis

Rodney Davis is currently serving his fourth term in Congress serving the 13th District of Illinois, a 14-county district covering both urban and rural areas of Central and Southwestern Illinois.

For the 116th Congress, Rodney serves on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and is Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Highways and Transit, which is the largest subcommittee in Congress and will be a key player in any infrastructure bill Congress passes. Additionally, he is the Ranking Member of the Committee on House Administration – a committee responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of the House and federal elections. Rodney is also serving his fourth term on the Committee on Agriculture where he continues to focus on issues important to Illinois farmers and helping people get out of poverty and into a good-paying job.

Serving on both the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and the Committee on Agriculture since coming to Congress has allowed Rodney to be a leader on issues essential to commerce in Illinois. He has played an integral role in long-term reauthorizations to upgrade our waterway, highway, railway, and aviation systems. Additionally, his leadership on two Farm Bill Conference Committees has helped produce farm bills that provide certainty to our farmers, protect crop insurance, strengthen agricultural research, and improve protections for organic products.

During his time in Congress, Rodney has established himself as an effective lawmaker who is able to work with his colleagues on both sides of the aisle to pass legislation. He has fought to ensure priorities of the 13th District are represented in Washington.

In 2018, Rodney successfully passed legislation reforming the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) disaster declaration process to help level the playing field for rural communities in Illinois. His legislation, which was signed into law in October 2018, requires FEMA to place greater consideration on the localized impact of a natural disaster. This is a major issue for smaller communities throughout the 13th District.

Rodney has demonstrated his ability to lead even in a divided government. The Hire More Heroes Act, his bill to help small businesses hire more of our nation’s veterans by changing Obamacare, overwhelmingly passed the House with more than 400 supporting votes and was signed into law in July 2015. This is one of the only legislative changes to Obamacare to be signed into law.

On June 14, 2017, Rodney was one of several Republicans who were attacked by a gunman while practicing for the Congressional Baseball Game at a baseball field in Alexandria, Virginia. Congressman Steve Scalise and several other teammates were injured, but due to the heroic actions of Capitol Police Officers David Bailey and Crystal Griner and the Alexandria Police Department, there were no fatalities. Following the shooting, Rodney has made it his mission to promote more civility in politics. He’s an active member of the bipartisan Civility Caucus and the Congressional Study Group on American Democracy and Civics which focuses on promoting civility in politics to young voters.

Prior to being elected, Rodney served as Projects Director for Congressman John Shimkus (IL-15) for 16 years helping Illinois citizens and communities cut through government red tape and secure federal funding. Rodney resides in Taylorville with his wife, Shannon, and their three children, Toryn, Clark, and Griffin.

Lauren Underwood
Illinois-14
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Lauren Underwood

Congresswoman Lauren Underwood serves Illinois’ 14th Congressional District and was sworn into the 116th U.S. Congress on January 3, 2019. Congresswoman Underwood is the first woman, the first person of color, and the first millennial to represent her community in Congress. She is also the youngest African American woman to serve in the United States House of Representatives.

Congresswoman Underwood serves on the House Committee on Education and Labor, the House Committee on Veteran’s Affairs, and is the Vice Chair of the House Committee on Homeland Security. Congresswoman Underwood co-founded and co-chairs the Black Maternal Health Caucus, which elevates the Black maternal health crisis within Congress and advances policy solutions to improve maternal health outcomes and end disparities. She also serves on the House Democratic Steering and Policy  Committee. Rep. Underwood is a member of the Future Forum, a group of young Democratic Members of Congress committed to listening to and standing up for the next generation of Americans, the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), and the LGBT Equality Caucus. As a strong supporter of addressing the gun violence epidemic, Congresswoman Underwood is a member of the Gun Violence Prevention Task Force.

Prior to her election to Congress, Congresswoman Underwood worked with a Medicaid plan in Chicago to ensure that it provided high-quality, cost-efficient care. She served as a Senior Advisor at the U.S. Department of Health and Human   Services (HHS), helping communities across the country prevent, prepare for, and respond to disasters, bioterror threats, and public health emergencies. As a career public servant at HHS, she helped implement the Affordable Care Act —   broadening access for those on Medicare, improving health care quality, and reforming private insurance. Congresswoman Underwood also taught future nurse practitioners through Georgetown University’s online master’s program.   Congresswoman Underwood is a graduate of the University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University. She graduated from Neuqua Valley High School and is a lifelong Girl Scout. She resides in Naperville, Illinois.    

Adam Kinzinger
Illinois-16
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Adam Kinzinger

dam D. Kinzinger is currently serving his fifth term in the United States House of Representatives and proudly represents Illinois’ Sixteenth Congressional District, which stretches across 14 counties in Northern Illinois. 

Congressman Kinzinger serves as a member of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce and the House Foreign Affairs Committee. His top priorities include strengthening U.S. energy policy and making our nation less reliant on foreign resources as well as bolstering the strength of our national security – both at home and abroad.

The Sixteenth District is home to four nuclear power plants (the most of any district in America), miles of windmills, hydropower plants, and ethanol and biodiesel plants. The nuclear energy production alone employs more than 2,500 people throughout the 16th District.  Coal and natural gas are also vital to the region. With such rich energy resources, Congressman Kinzinger is focused on advancing energy production throughout the 16th District and across the United States.

Prior to being elected to Congress, Kinzinger served in the Air Force in both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom.  He has always been a strong supporter of U.S. leadership in the Middle East, and he was among the first members of Congress to call for airstrikes against ISIS. He continues to focus on eradicating this threat with a comprehensive and detailed strategy. 
In 2007, he received the United States Air Force Airman's Medal for saving the life of a young woman who was being violently attacked. He wrestled the knife away from the attacker and pinned him to the ground until the police arrived. He was also awarded the National Guard's Valley Forge Cross for Heroism and was selected as the Southeastern Wisconsin American Red Cross Hero of the Year.

At the age of 41, Congressman Kinzinger is one of the youngest Members of Congress, yet he ranks in the top half of seniority in the full House of Representatives. He was named ‘A Republican Role Model for 2017’ by the Washington Post and is frequently applauded for his pragmatic approach to the myriad of issues facing America, and the world.

As a 20-year old sophomore at Illinois State University (ISU), Adam Kinzinger challenged a three-term incumbent for the McLean County Board. He advocated for restoring local government back into the hands of the people and won a seat on the board, becoming one of the youngest county board members in McLean County history. He served on the McLean County Board from 1998-2003, and graduated from ISU in 2000.

After serving on the McLean County Board, Kinzinger joined the United States Air Force. He was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in November 2003 and later awarded his pilot wings. He has served in the Air Force Special Operations, Air Combat Command, Air Mobility Command, and Air National Guard.

Kinzinger continues to serve his country as a pilot in the Air National Guard, with the current rank of Lieutenant Colonel, and balances this service with his duties in Congress.

Congressman Kinzinger’s roots run deep across Illinois. He was born in Kankakee, grew up in Bloomington, and now resides in Channahon. His mother Jodi is a retired elementary schoolteacher, and his father Rus is a former CEO of two faith-based organizations. His parents instilled in him and his two siblings the importance of hard work, compassion, and teamwork through their own service to their communities. Kinzinger carries these Midwestern values and his servant leadership with him to Washington, D.C. as he fights to preserve and promote the American dream for hardworking Illinoisans.

Cheri Bustos
Illinois-17
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Cheri Bustos

For Congresswoman Cheri Bustos, it has always begun with listening.

That’s why on just about any given Saturday, you can find her walking the aisles of one of the many grocery stores across the 17th Congressional District, in what she calls “Supermarket Saturdays.” From cities like Moline, Rockford and Peoria, to smaller communities like Canton, Kewanee and Galena, she walks the aisles to ask folks what’s on their minds, what they want her to know, what they want her to fight for or fight against. And she wants to know about them personally:

Have they been able to take their family on a vacation in the last year?

When their kids graduate, are they going to be able to find a job in their hometown?

Since Cheri was first elected, she has gone out on “Cheri on Shift” job shadowing stops. During those visits, she has walked in the shoes of hardworking men and women from all over our community. Sure, she’s learned how to drive a forklift, spot weld on cars and even process carp from the Mississippi River– but what she really values most about these interactions is having the opportunity to ask workers about their hopes and dreams: whether their pay is keeping up with their bills, and what’s holding back our businesses from expanding. She listens for their insight, their ideas and their input so she can bring their voices to Washington.

Listening is something that comes naturally to Cheri. As one of the only former journalists in Congress, Cheri spent nearly two decades listening to and writing about the struggles and the amazing accomplishments of everyday people across her community. While she’s hung up her press pass, she still uses her pen to fight for the values that unite us as Midwesterners – creating more good-paying jobs, bringing down the cost of health care, investing in our schools and fighting wasteful spending and hurtful government practices.

Now in her fourth term in Congress, Cheri is the only member of elected Democratic House Leadership from the Midwest. She also serves on the Democratic Steering and Policy Committee. In both of these roles, she is a relentless advocate for steering the Democratic agenda to address the very real economic challenges millions of Americans struggle with at the kitchen table each night.

Cheri has also remained committed to serving as a Watchdog in Washington. At a time when many hardworking families are tightening their belts, she’s relentlessly worked across the aisle to ensure Illinoisans’ hard-earned tax dollars are put to good use. Her efforts have resulted in legislation decreasing improper payments from Federal agencies, strengthening the oversight of government charge cards and ensuring Federal agencies maximize their space and manufacturing capacity before outsourcing work. Cheri is also a founding member of the bi-partisan Reformers Caucus which exclusively focuses on reforms to Congress and the legislative process.

In the 116th Congress, Cheri was appointed to the powerful House Appropriations Committee. On this committee, Cheri will have the opportunity to ensure the needs of our region are being met and properly funded by the federal government – whether that be investments in our region’s defense priorities, infrastructure, schools or rural hospitals. Additionally, since the Appropriations Committee provides funds for the entire federal government, Cheri will be well positioned to ensure federal dollars are being spent wisely and do not go to waste.

Cheri also continues to serve on the House Agriculture Committee, where in her first term she played an important role to develop and pass the first long-term Farm Bill in years. Then, in her third term, she continued that work by serving as a member of the Farm Bill Conference Committee where she helped lead efforts to pass a bipartisan Farm Bill that provided farmers with the support they need to continue putting food on the plates of Americans across our nation. While working on this key piece of legislation, she conducted a 21st Century Heartland Tour to better understand the needs of our family farmers. Sitting around kitchen tables, in barns and garages across the 17th Congressional District, she asked hundreds of our farmers and agricultural producers what worked for them in the last Farm Bill and what they needed from a new one.

Through all her work, Cheri remains devoted to this: “We were born with two ears and one mouth, so we can listen twice as much as we speak.”

Cheri knows that if we want to put hardworking families first once again, we need Washington to spend a lot more time listening to the Heartland.

Born in Springfield, Illinois, Cheri Callahan Bustos comes from a long line of farmers and teachers and grew up in a family that loved sports and their community.

The granddaughter of a hog farmer and a nurse and the daughter of a social worker and a newsman, Cheri was the youngest of three children.

Her dad would go on to work in public service and Major League Baseball. Her mom would go on to be a preschool teacher.  She is proud of her agricultural roots.

She followed her dad into the news business. While covering the police beat as a reporter in the Quad-Cities, Cheri met a rookie cop named Gerry Bustos who she fell in love with and married. With Gerry, who now serves as the Sheriff of Rock Island County, they raised three sons and they now have two grandchildren, all of whom proudly call Illinois home.

Throughout her career in journalism, Cheri used her pen to help her community. She uncovered numerous stories of corruption and greed in government, winning awards for her work on behalf of the public interest.

After a career in investigative journalism, Cheri worked in health care before, during and after the passage of the Affordable Care Act, for one of the nation’s largest non-denominational, non-profit health care systems. There, she helped families access affordable coverage and worked to improve the quality of health care available in the community.

Cheri has long been active in her community and served on numerous nonprofit boards and as the President of The Women’s Connection, which was at the time one of Illinois’ largest women’s membership organizations. In 2007, Cheri’s commitment to public service and desire to further give back to the community led her to run for local office.

Cheri was elected to serve on the City Council in East Moline for two terms and made her top priority economic development. She led the removal of downtown blight and the development of the largest construction project in downtown East Moline in generations: a nonprofit health clinic.

In 2013, she was sworn into her first term in Congress, representing the hardworking families of the 17th Congressional District. And she hasn’t stopped fighting for them ever since.

Cheri earned her Bachelor’s Degree in government and politics from the University of Maryland, College Park, and a Master’s Degree in Public Affairs Reporting from the University of Illinois at Springfield. She also attended Illinois College in Jacksonville, where both her parents and son graduated. An accomplished basketball and volleyball player, Cheri was inducted into the Illinois College Sports Hall of Fame in 1994.

Darin LaHood
Illinois-18
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Darin LaHood

Congressman Darin LaHood, born and raised in Peoria, serves the constituents of the 18th District of Illinois. Sworn into the US House of Representatives on September 17, 2015, LaHood quickly transitioned into office after his special-election win on September 10. He won re-election to serve his second full-term in Congress on November 6, 2018, defeating his opponent with 68-percent of the vote.

The 18th District spans 19 counties across central and west-central Illinois, ranging from McLean County (Bloomington-Normal) to Adams County (Quincy). LaHood serves close to 710,000 constituents.

Prior to his election to Congress, LaHood served four years in the Illinois State Senate, beginning in 2011. LaHood spent more than nine years as a State and Federal Prosecutor. From 2001-2006, he worked for the U.S. Department of Justice as an Assistant United States Attorney in Las Vegas, Nevada. LaHood has also served as an Assistant State's Attorney in Cook County and Tazewell County. From 2006 up until his election to the House of Representatives, he practiced with the Peoria law firm of Miller, Hall & Triggs.

LaHood's record throughout his public service has resonated a strong, conservative record, promoting economic development and fiscal responsibility. LaHood has been an outspoken advocate for creating a better business climate in Illinois to boost the state and national economy, to create jobs for Illinoisans.

LaHood currently serves on the House Ways and Means Committee after being selected by his colleagues in January of 2018. The Ways and Means Committee is the House’s oldest committee and has jurisdiction over all taxation, trade and tariffs, and other revenue-raising measures. He serves on the Ways and Means Subcommittees on Tax Policy and Oversight.

LaHood also serves on the U.S. Joint Economic Committee and is a member of the US-Cuba working group. He currently co-chairs the US-China working group, the U.S.-Brazil Caucus, the Digital Trade Caucus, the U.S.-Lebanon Friendship Caucus, and the Congressional Soccer Caucus.

Recognizing the need for reform, LaHood has fought to increase transparency and promote ethical behavior. He looks to build a strong, pro-growth economy, while fighting to reduce a record deficit that threatens the future of our children and grandchildren.

LaHood, a third generation Peorian, graduated from Spalding High School. He earned a B.A. from Loras College and holds a J.D. from The John Marshall Law School. In 2013, he was selected as an Edgar Fellow, a program run by former Governor Jim Edgar, which highlights future Illinois leaders. In 2008, LaHood was recognized in Peoria as a 40 Leaders Under Forty award winner. An avid runner, he has completed five marathons.

Robin Kelly
Illinois-2
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Robin Kelly

Congresswoman Robin Kelly has dedicated her career to public service as an advocate for Illinois families.  Since being elected to serve the 2nd Congressional District in 2013, she has worked to expand economic opportunity, community wellness, and public safety across the state, championing numerous initiatives to generate job growth, reduce health disparities, and end gun violence.

Congresswoman Kelly is a Member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee (the main policy-writing body of the House) and serves on the Health, Energy, and Consumer Protection and Commerce subcommittees. Her Energy and Commerce work is focused on expanding access to healthcare, consumer protection for American families and economic development.

Additionally, she is a Member of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform and serves on the national security and civil rights and civil liberties subcommittees. She is also represents the Midwest (Region IV) on the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee, which sets the policy direction of the Democratic Caucus, and serves as a member of the House Democracy Parternship.

A staunch champion of common sense gun reforms and responsible community policing, Representative Kelly is a Co-Chair of the Congressional Gun Violence Prevention Taskforce and is the author of The 2014 Kelly Report on Gun Violence in America, the first-ever Congressional analysis of the nation's gun violence epidemic that offers a blueprint for ending the crisis. 

Committed to improving the health and wellness of vulnerable communities across the country, the Congresswoman serves as the Chair of the Congressional Black Caucus Health Braintrust, and Co-Chairs the Congressional Caucus on Black Women and Girls. She also Co-Chairs the House Democratic Policy Group and House Tech Accountability Caucus.

Prior to her election to Congress, Kelly was a member of the Illinois House of Representatives, served as Chief Administrative Officer of Cook County (the second largest county in the United States) and was Chief of Staff to Illinois State Treasurer Alexi Giannoulias - becoming the first African American woman to serve as Chief of Staff to an elected constitutional statewide officeholder. 

The daughter of a small business owner and postal worker, Congresswoman Kelly moved to Illinois to attend Bradley University in Peoria, where she earned her B.A. in psychology and an M.A. in counseling. She later received a Ph.D. in political science from Northern Illinois University.  She lives in Matteson with her husband, Dr. Nathaniel Horn, and has two adult children, Kelly and Ryan.

Jesus "Chuy" Garcia
Illinois-4
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Jesus "Chuy" Garcia

U.S. Representative Jesús G. “Chuy” García proudly represents the Fourth Congressional District of Illinois. He was sworn into office on January 3, 2019, during the 116th Congress.

Throughout his career, Congressman García has been a progressive voice fighting to improve the lives of his working-class neighbors, many of whom are immigrants like him. He is a coalition builder committed to empowering youth and expanding access to quality education, affordable housing, and economic opportunity.

He currently serves as a member of the influential Financial Services Committee, Natural Resources Committee, and the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. He is a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHC), Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC), the Congressional Equality Caucus, Congressional Pro-Choice Caucus, and New Americans Caucus. He is also the founder the Future of Transportation Caucus. 

Congressman García was born in Los Pinos, a small village in the Mexican state of Durango. He is the youngest of four children raised by his mother while his father worked in the United States, first under the WWII-era bracero program and later at a cold-storage plant in Chicago. In 1965, Congressman García and his family immigrated to the United States with permanent resident status. He still remembers his first American meal: a bologna sandwich from a roadside diner in Texas.

Prior to his election to Congress in November of 2018, Congressman García was a member of the Cook County Board of Commissioners. As Commissioner, he opposed housing discrimination against disadvantaged communities, raised the minimum wage, and mandated that County employees have access to paid sick leave. He also passed an ordinance ending Cook County’s cooperation with the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE). The measure was the first of its kind in the nation and set an example followed by more than 250 localities.

Congressman García began organizing for workers’ rights and more inclusive city services during his college years at University of Illinois in Chicago (UIC). He first entered political life in 1984, when he was elected Committeeman of the Cook County Democratic Party. He quickly earned recognition as a coalition builder between Chicago’s Latino and African American communities.

Soon afterward, Congressman García was elected to represent Chicago’s 22nd Ward on the City Council. During his time as Alderman, Congressman García prevented non-attorney immigration practitioners from levying unreasonable fees. In 1986, he became the Chairman for the Council’s Committee on Aviation, where he helped implement the Automated Guideway Transit (ATG) at O’Hare International Airport.

Mr. García also served as State Senator of Illinois’ 1st District. In 1993, he passed the Language Assistance Services Act, which requires hospitals and long-term care facilities to provide resources for effective communication with limited-English-speaking and deaf patients.

In 2015, Congressman García became the first Chicago mayoral candidate to push a sitting mayor into a run-off.

Congressman García still lives in the Little Village neighborhood of Chicago with his beloved wife Evelyn and has three adult children.

Mike Quigley
Illinois-5
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Mike Quigley

Mike Quigley was elected to Congress to represent Illinois’ 5th District after serving his community for more than thirty years. He previously served as a Cook County Commissioner and began his career through community service in the Lakeview neighborhood. His election to Congress was an opportunity to take his unique style of reform-minded politics, which Chicagoans have known for years, from Cook County to Washington.

As a member of the House Committee on Appropriations, Mike is using his position to prioritize investments in innovation and Chicago-area infrastructure, which will grow the local economy and spur job creation. He currently serves as the Chair of the Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government where he is focused on continuing his efforts to protect consumers, promote small business, and protect our financial system from policies that prioritize Wall Street at the expense of working Americans.

In 2015, Mike was appointed by Speaker Nancy Pelosi to serve on the influential House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI). Representing Chicago, one of the nation’s largest cities and a major hub for travel and commerce, Mike brings to the committee a unique understanding of the national security challenges we face and has championed policies that will keep America safe.

He is also the co-founder and co-chair of the bipartisan Congressional Transparency Caucus and has introduced landmark legislation that would significantly strengthen oversight at all branches of the federal government and utilizes 21st century technology to expand public access to information. 

Mike has established himself as a leader on many of our nation’s most challenging and significant issues. He continues to fight for full LGBT equality as Vice Chair of the LGBT Equality Caucus, as well as a woman’s right to choose and commonsense gun law reforms that will make our communities safer.

Andre Carson
Indiana-7
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Andre Carson

Congressman André D. Carson, now in his 6th full term in the U.S. House of Representatives, has established himself as an influential leader and respected public servant, fighting for good paying jobs, economic growth, and safer communities for Indiana’s working families. 

Congressman Carson consistently fights for the middle class, securing hundreds of millions for investments in public safety, education, infrastructure, and the creation and protection of thousands of good paying jobs. Additionally, the congressman has made accessibility a priority for his office, holding regular meetings around Indianapolis and hosting Congress on Your Corner events to ensure constituents have easy access to the resources and information they need.

Since being elected to Congress, Congressman Carson has joined a number of caucuses, coalitions, and tasks forces that focus on some of the issues that he considers to be top priorities in the 7th District and around the country.  Together with other like-minded Members of Congress, he has worked to bring about solutions to some of the most important issues facing our city and nation.  Some of his memberships include: the Congressional Black Caucus, the Progressive Caucus, the New Democrat Coalition, and the LGBT Equality Caucus.

In Washington, Congressman Carson fought to pass the historic health care reform law, which provides families and businesses with better health insurance options and makes health care more affordable and accessible for tens of millions of Americans. As a former member of the House Financial Services Committee, he also helped pass Wall Street Reform, which protects consumers by ending government bailouts and the risky lending practices that almost destroyed our economy.

In the 116th Congress, Congressman Carson serves as the Chairman of Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation Subcommittee and as a member of the Strategic Technologies and Advanced Research Subcommittee on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI). With these assignments, he plays a vital role in ensuring dedicated intelligence personnel have the tools and resources needed to keep America safe and that their activities are in the best interest of its people.

He also serves on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, sitting on the Aviation and the Railroads, Pipelines and Hazardous Materials Subcommittees.

Congressman Carson is also a rising member of House leadership. During the 116th Congress, Carson serves as a Senior Whip for the House Democratic Caucus. This high-profile position allows him to fight for Indiana’s 7th Congressional District at the highest levels of congressional leadership.    

Congressman Carson has authored six bills that have been signed into law: The Service Members Mental Health Screening Act, which ensures a more holistic evaluation of mental health assessments before and after deployment; the Military Families Financial Preparedness Act, which provides service members and their spouses with financial counseling before leaving the military; the Military Suicide Reduction Act, which provides mid-deployment mental health assessments to service members deployed in combat; the Military Mental Health Empowerment Act, which seeks to end dangerous misperceptions that discourage mental health treatment by ensuring service members are aware of their privacy rights; the Kennedy-King Establishment Act, which designates Martin Luther King Park in Indianapolis as a National Commemorative Site, and adds it to the new National Civil Rights Network; and the Ariel Rios Federal Building Act. 

As one of three Muslims serving in Congress, Congressman Carson is a champion for vulnerable populations and is committed to the goal of equal protection under the law. André has long been involved in the fight to achieve gender fairness, religious freedom, and LGBTQ equality.

Congressman Carson is a proud Indianapolis native, having grown up on the city’s east side. He is a graduate of Arsenal Tech High School, and he holds a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice Management from Concordia University-Wisconsin and a Master’s in Business Management from Indiana Wesleyan University. 

Before taking office, Congressman Carson served on the Indianapolis City-County Council and worked full-time in law enforcement. He also worked in intelligence and counter-terrorism for the Indiana Department of Homeland Security and served at the Indiana Intelligence Fusion Center. There he worked in an anti-terrorism unit to protect Indianapolis and the United States from terrorist threats at home and abroad.

Sharice Davids
Kansas-3
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Sharice Davids

Representative Davids was raised by a single mother, who served in the Army for 20 years. After graduating from Leavenworth High School, she worked her way through Johnson County Community College and the University of Missouri-Kansas City before earning a law degree from Cornell Law School. As a first generation college student who worked the entire time she was in college, Rep. Davids understands the importance of quality public schools and affordable higher education. It is that foundation that allowed her to go on to a successful career, focused on economic and community development, which included time as a White House Fellow under President Barack Obama.

When she was sworn into the 116th Congress, Rep. Davids became one of the first two Native American women to serve in Congress. Rep. Davids has centered her work in office on putting Kansans first, fighting to limit the influence of special interests and make health care more affordable and accessible to everyone. She is a resident of Roeland Park.

Cedric Richmond
Louisiana-2
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Cedric Richmond

Congressman Cedric Richmond represents Louisiana’s 2nd Congressional District in the United States House of Representatives. Congressman Richmond currently serves on the House Committee on Homeland Security and the House Committee on the Judiciary. Outside of Committee service. He is also a member of the New Democrat Coalition and serves as the House Democratic Assistant to the Majority Whip. 

As a member of the Committee on Homeland Security, Congressman Richmond works to ensure New Orleans and surrounding communities are adequately prepared for any emergency through oversight of the Federal Emergency Management Association (FEMA). He also works to ensure the security of the nation’s critical infrastructure, borders, and ports. He is also the Chairman of the Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Innovation Subcommittee.

As a member of the Committee on the Judiciary, the second oldest standing committee in Congress, Congressman Richmond works with committee members to exercise oversight responsibility for the U.S. Departments of Justice and Homeland Security.

During the 116th Congress, Congressman Richmond served as the Chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus. He is currently the Chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. 

Born and raised in New Orleans, Congressman Richmond is a strong believer in the value of mentorship in his hometown. He is a graduate of Benjamin Franklin High School, earned his undergraduate degree from Morehouse College in Atlanta, GA, and his Juris Doctorate from the Tulane University School of Law in New Orleans. Congressman Richmond is also a graduate of the Harvard University Executive Education Program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government. In 2019, Congressman Richmond was inducted into the Tulane Law School Hall of Fame. 

Lori Trahan
Massachusetts-3
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Lori Trahan

Lori Trahan was born and raised in a working-class family in Lowell, Massachusetts. Her father was a union ironworker and her mother, a domestic worker, who juggled various part time jobs while raising four girls. The first in her family to graduate from college, Lori earned a scholarship to play Division 1 volleyball at Georgetown University. She joined the staff of former Congressman Marty Meehan as a scheduler, eventually working her way up to Chief of Staff. Following her public service, Lori began working in the private sector as the only female executive at a tech company before moving on to cofound a woman owned and operated consulting firm, Concire, where she advised various companies on business strategy, and how to create the ideal conditions for employees – especially women - to thrive. She and her husband, Dave, currently reside in Westford, MA and are raising two young girls, Grace and Caroline, while keeping tabs on their three grown stepsons, Thomas, Dean, and Christian.

As a member of the House Education and Labor and House Armed Services Committees, Lori is focused on fighting for working families on issues such as affordable health care, quality public education, workforce development, the environment, and working to end the pain and suffering of the opioid crisis. Lori is the first Portuguese-American woman elected to Congress and is a member of the New Dems and the Congressional Progressive Caucus. 

Katherine Clark
Massachusetts-5
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Katherine Clark

Congresswoman Katherine Clark proudly serves the Fifth District of Massachusetts. She was first elected in a special election in December of 2013. 

Katherine’s career in public service is driven by her commitment to helping children and families succeed. She is a vocal advocate for ending wage discrimination, protecting women’s health care, access to affordable, high-quality child care, paid family leave, safer schools, and other reforms to address the challenges women and families face. She believes that Congress must work to end the glaring disconnect between the needs of families at home and priorities in Washington.

In Congress, she brings her experience as a state senator, state representative, general counsel for the Massachusetts Office of Child Care Services, and policy chief for the state attorney general.

Katherine represents a diverse district comprised of 24 cities and towns that stretch from the coastal communities of Revere and Winthrop through the economic engine of MetroWest.  

In fall 2018, she was elected by her colleagues to serve as Vice Chair of the Democratic Caucus, making her the sixth highest ranking Democrat in the 116th Congress. Additionally, she serves as a member of the Steering and Policy Committee within the Caucus.

Katherine is a member of the U.S. House Committee on Appropriations and three subcommittees within Appropriations: Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies; Legislative Branch; and Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies.

Katherine is a proud member of several caucuses in Congress, including the Congressional Progressive Caucus and the Women’s Caucus.

Katherine, her husband Rodney and their three boys Addison, Jared and Nathaniel live in Melrose.

Dutch Ruppersberger
Maryland-2
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Dutch Ruppersberger

Congressman C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger is serving his ninth term in the United States House of Representatives for the citizens of Maryland’s 2nd District. Congressman Ruppersberger is known as a common sense consensus builder who works with Members from both sides of the aisle to get results for Maryland and the nation.

Congressman Ruppersberger currently serves on the powerful House Appropriations Committee, including the Defense, the Legislative Branch and the Homeland Security subcommittees. The Appropriations Committee is responsible for allocating hundreds of billions of federal dollars each year.

The assignment comes after a committee-record 12 years serving on the House Intelligence Committee, including four as Ranking Member. Congressman Ruppersberger was the first Democratic freshman ever appointed to the committee, which oversees the collection and analysis of intelligence from around the world to ensure our national security and prevent potential crisis situations — especially terrorist activity. He traveled to more than 50 countries including Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Yemen, China and Venezuela during his time on the committee. 

On the committee, he developed a reputation for bipartisan leadership with then-Chairman and Republican Mike Rogers.  Beginning in 2011, the pair worked together to pass five intelligence authorization bills over four years -- after a 6-year period without one -- as well as bipartisan cybersecurity legislation. In 2015, they became the first dual recipients of the prestigious William Oliver Baker Award from the nonpartisan Intelligence and National Security Alliance for their pragmatic leadership.

Congressman Ruppersberger previously served on the House Government Reform and House Armed Services Committees, where he worked to help keep our country safe and make sure our veterans at home, as well as our warfighters on the frontlines, have the resources they need.

Maryland’s 2nd District includes parts of Baltimore City as well as Baltimore, Anne Arundel, Harford and Howard Counties. It is a vital center of trade and commerce for the state and national economy and includes the Port of Baltimore and the hundreds of businesses and manufacturing concerns dependent on it. The 2nd District is also home to the National Security Agency, Fort Meade, federal Cyber Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay and other installations essential to the country’s national security.

Creating jobs and improving Maryland’s economy is one of Congressman Ruppersberger’s top priorities. He is working hard to help middle-class Marylanders achieve more than just making ends meet. The Congressman is also fighting to keep our country safe and get our first responders the funds they need to protect our communities and our families.

A former assistant state’s attorney in Baltimore County, Congressman Ruppersberger decided to run for office after a near-fatal car accident while investigating a drug trafficking case. Thanks to the dedication of doctors at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, Congressman Ruppersberger survived and began campaigning for office to assist Shock Trauma after they saved his life. He remains an active supporter of the hospital, serving as Vice Chairman of its Board of Visitors. He also serves as Vice Chairman of the Board of Visitors at the United States Naval Academy.

Congressman Ruppersberger has served in public office for more than 34 years. He was elected to the Baltimore County Council in 1985 and again in 1989, chosen twice as council chairman. He was elected Baltimore County Executive in 1994 and 1998, and, under his leadership, the county was named one of the nation’s four best-managed counties by Governing Magazine. The county achieved three AAA bond ratings and staggering job growth during his administration. 

A native of Baltimore City, Congressman Ruppersberger spent his summers as a lifeguard and police officer in Ocean City, Md. He attended Baltimore City College and the University of Maryland College Park, where he played lacrosse. He earned his Juris Doctorate from the University of Baltimore Law School.

The Congressman has been married for 50 years to his high school sweetheart, the former Kay Murphy. Together they have two grown children and five grandchildren.

Anthony Brown
Maryland-4
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Anthony Brown

Anthony Brown was elected to his first term representing Maryland’s 4th Congressional District - encompassing parts of Anne Arundel and Prince George’s Counties - on November 8, 2016 and was sworn in on January 3, 2017. He is currently serving his second term in Congress.

Congressman Brown serves as the Vice Chair of the House Armed Services Committee, where he helps shape the policies to ensure we maintain the best-trained and best equipped military, make the right investments to fight 21st century threats, and keep our country strong and safe. Congressman Brown is also a member of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure as well as the Committee of Natural Resources, working to build 21st century transportation networks and ensure future generations of Marylanders enjoy a clean and healthy environment. He was also tapped by Democratic leaders to serve on the equally-divided House Committee on Ethics. The Ethics Committee interprets, investigates and enforces the House Code of Official Conduct and rules regarding gifts, financial disclosure and other activities of Members of Congress and employees. Congressman Brown is currently co-Chair of the New Democrat Coalition' National Security Task Force.

The son of immigrants and raised in a home where his father was the first in the family to ever attend college, Congressman Brown was taught the value of service at a young age. Through his military and public service, Anthony has devoted his life to serving his community and defending our nation.

A retired Colonel in the United States Army Reserve, Congressman Brown’s military record spanned more than a quarter century as an aviator and JAG officer, during which time he graduated first in his flight class and received both Airborne and Air Assault qualifications. Congressman Brown was awarded the Legion of Merit for his distinguished military service. In 2004, he was deployed to Iraq, where he earned a Bronze Star and became one of the nation’s highest-ranking elected officials at that time to serve a tour of duty in that conflict.

In 1998, Congressman Brown was first elected to the Maryland House of Delegates to represent Prince George’s County. Recognized by his colleagues for his leadership, Congressman Brown rose quickly, serving as Vice Chair of the powerful House Judiciary Committee and, later, as Majority Whip.

Congressman Brown made an even larger impact on Maryland during his eight years as Lt. Governor. He fought to increase investments in Maryland schools so that every child could receive a world-class education, protected victims of domestic violence, expanded health coverage to over 391,000 Marylanders, increased employment and health services to veterans, and spearheaded efforts to plan for and coordinate the arrival of 60,000 BRAC-related jobs to Maryland, including at Joint Base Andrews and Fort Meade.

Congressman Brown is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School. He and his wife Karmen are members of St. Joseph Catholic Church in Largo. They reside in Prince George’s County where they are raising their three children, Rebecca, Jonathan, and Anthony.

Majority Leader Steny Hoyer
Maryland-5
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Majority Leader Steny Hoyer

In the Fifth Congressional District, Congressman Steny H. Hoyer is a tireless fighter for economic development and a leader in creating jobs. He has helped create and save nearly 23,000 jobs by supporting federal facilities and associated businesses located in and around the Fifth District, including NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Patuxent River Naval Air Station, the Naval Surface Warfare Center at Indian Head, the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, the FDA at White Oak, and the future NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction in College Park.

He also works hard to protect our natural resources. In addition to supporting every major piece of environmental legislation while in Congress, he has co-sponsored numerous bills to protect the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries, including the "Chesapeake Bay Restoration Act.” He secured more than $10 million in the 1990s to respond to Pfiesteria and to study its effects on humans; helped secure more than $400 million in the 2008 Farm Bill to enable farmers to implement environmental best practices and reduce runoff into the Chesapeake Bay; and championed the efforts to replenish the declining oyster population of the Bay and to restore the Potomac, Patuxent and St. Mary's rivers.

Congressman Hoyer works to meet the transportation needs of his constituents by securing funding to maintain and improve local roads, commuter bus systems, and the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA). He also works to keep local communities and the Washington region safe by fighting to fully fund Community Oriented Policing Services, the Assistance for Firefighters Grant Program, and upgrades for first responders’ communications systems.

Congressman Hoyer is also dedicated to outstanding constituent service. At offices in Washington, D.C., Greenbelt, and Waldorf, he and his staff help constituents cut through red tape and solve problems related to passports, immigration, government services, and a host of other issues.

In Congress, Steny Hoyer has built an outstanding record of achievement and earned a reputation as a strong leader and an able legislator. In the 111th Congress, his skill at consensus-building helped the House pass important legislation to strengthen our economy and bring health coverage to an additional 4 million low-income children through the State Children’s Health Insurance Program. He has also been one of Congress’s leading voices for fiscal responsibility and a government that pays for what it buys, and he has spearheaded an effort to invest in creating new jobs in Maryland and across the country through Democrats’ Make It In America plan.

Congressman Hoyer shepherded the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) to overwhelming approval in the House in 1990. This landmark civil rights legislation, signed into law on July 26, 1990 by President George H.W. Bush, has helped millions of disabled Americans enter the workforce, achieve independence and go as far as their talents take them. In 2008, Congressman Hoyer also led the effort to pass the ADA Amendments Act, which allows millions of Americans with disabilities to benefit from the ADA’s original intent of inclusion.

Congressman Hoyer also gained wide acclaim for guiding the Help America Vote Act to House passage and producing a House-Senate Conference Report that was signed into law by President George W. Bush on Oct. 29, 2002. Washington Post columnist David Broder called this comprehensive election reform legislation "the most significant piece of election law since [the] Voting Rights Act."

In addition, Congressman Hoyer drafted and helped secure passage of the Federal Employee Pay Comparability Act (FEPCA). FEPCA, which was signed into law in November 1990, was a major effort to restructure the pay system for Federal employees, which attempts to ensure fairness in pay and comparability to similar work outside the Federal government.

Congressman Hoyer also is a widely respected voice on foreign policy and international affairs. As the former Chair and Ranking Democrat on the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (the Helsinki Commission), he championed the cause of human rights, individual freedoms, democracy and religious liberties throughout the world. He called for decisive U.S. and NATO action to stop the carnage throughout the former Yugoslavia and condemned the repressive tactics of Afghanistan's former ruling regime, the Taliban, and recognized the danger posed by that government before the terrorist attacks of September 11. He also has taken a very active role in urging international action to stop the genocide in Sudan, and in April 2007 led a Congressional delegation to Darfur. On May 21, 2009, Denmark honored Congressman Hoyer by making him a Knight of the Order of the Dannebrog.

Through his committee assignments and leadership positions, Congressman Hoyer has aggressively advocated for his Fifth District constituents and also is a respected voice on national and international issues. As a member of the Appropriations Committee from the time he took office until he entered the Congressional leadership, Congressman Hoyer has secured funding for numerous important projects in Calvert, Charles, Prince George’s, Anne Arundel, and St. Mary's counties and throughout the State of Maryland. He also has worked to ensure that the military bases in the Fifth District not only survived base closings but grew and thrived.

On the Transportation, Treasury and General Government Appropriations Subcommittee, Congressman Hoyer became widely recognized as a national leader on issues affecting Federal employees and retirees. In addition to guiding FEPCA to passage, he fights year in and year out for fair pay and benefits for Federal employees, and he has secured funding for telecommuting centers that save money and reduce traffic congestion. 

He also has been a strong proponent of Federal law enforcement efforts that fall within the Subcommittee's jurisdiction, securing funding for innovative crime-fighting projects such as the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Program, Gang Resistance Education and Treatment Program, and the Youth Crime Gun Interdiction Initiative. In addition, he is a long-time supporter of the COPS on the Beat Program, which has meant more than $30 million in Federal funding to hire an additional 700 police officers in the Fifth District.

On the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, Congressman Hoyer championed education and funding for the Class Size Reduction Initiative, Head Start, and teacher training programs. He has also been an advocate for increased funding for childhood immunization and for full-service community schools, which provide a range of important services for students, especially in early childhood years.

Congressman Hoyer is well-recognized for his efforts to make the House more efficient and "customer friendly.” As the former Ranking Democrat on the Committee on House Administration, which oversees the internal operations of the House, he played an important role on policy issues ranging from election reform and campaign finance reform to enhancing the security of the Capitol complex in the aftermath of September 11.

As House Majority Leader for the 116th Congress, Congressman Hoyer is the second-ranking member of the House Democratic Leadership. He is charged with mobilizing the party vote on important legislation, acting as a liaison between Members and the Democratic Leadership, and coordinating strategy within the Caucus. He also plays a key role in shaping House Democrats’ legislative priorities and in delivering the Democratic message.

Congressman Hoyer's experience, know-how, and strong work ethic have led to increasing responsibilities within the House Democratic leadership. He previously served as House Majority Leader from 2007 to 2011 – which made him the highest-ranking Member of Congress from Maryland in history – and House Democratic Whip from 2003 to 2007 and in the 112th,113th, 114th and 115th Congresses. Prior to serving in his first term as Whip, Congressman Hoyer served as Chair of the Democratic Caucus – the fourth-ranking position among House Democrats – from 1989 to 1995. He is the former Co-Chair (and a current member) of the Democratic Steering Committee, and served as the chief candidate recruiter for House Democrats from 1995 to 2000. Congressman Hoyer also served as Deputy Majority Whip from 1987 to 1989. Now in his 20th term in Congress, he also became the longest-serving Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Maryland in history on June 4, 2007.

Congressman Hoyer attended Suitland High School in Prince George's County, and in 1963 he graduated with high honors from the University of Maryland, selected "Outstanding Male Graduate” that year.  In 1966, he received his law degree from Georgetown University Law Center. That same year, at the age of 27, he won a seat in the Maryland Senate.

In 1975, he was elected President of the Senate, the youngest ever in state history, and served in that body until 1978. He was a member of the State Board of Higher Education from 1978 to 1981, the year in which he came to Congress after winning a special election.

Congressman Hoyer currently serves on the St. Mary's College Board of Trustees. He also is a former member of the Board of Regents of the University System of Maryland and the United States Naval Academy Board of Visitors. Congressman Hoyer and his wife, the late Judith Pickett Hoyer, have three daughters: Susan, Stefany, and Anne; son-in-law Loren Taylor; grandchildren Judy, James Cleveland, and Alexa; and great-grandchildren Ava, Braedon and Brooklyn.

David Trone
Maryland-6
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David Trone

Congressman David Trone was elected in 2018 to serve Maryland's Sixth Congressional District, which includes all or part of Montgomery, Frederick, Garrett, Allegany, and Washington Counties. David serves on the Education and Labor, Foreign Affairs, and Joint Economic Committees, where he is fighting to make progress on issues that matter to Marylanders, including the opioid epidemic, criminal justice reform, and funding for mental health research.  

David grew up on a chicken and hog farm with his mother, a grade school teacher, and his father, a WWII veteran and member of the U.S. Army Reserves. Though the family lost the farm to bankruptcy, David was given an opportunity through education. He earned a Bachelor's degree from Furman University and a Master's in Business Administration (MBA) from the Wharton School of Business by taking out student loans.

It was in graduate school that he met his wife, June, and opened his first store selling soda and beer. Through a lot of hard work and good fortune, that single store grew into a business with more than 200 stores in 24 states and 7,000 employees nationwide - 650 of whom are in Montgomery County in Maryland. It is this expertise in business and management that David brings to his time in Congress.

David lives in Montgomery County with his wife June. They have four children: Michelle, Julie, Natalie, and Rob, and three dogs: Lyndon, Hubert, and Lola.

Chellie Pingree
Maine-1
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Chellie Pingree

Chellie Pingree never anticipated a life in politics. Living on the offshore island of North Haven, Maine, she raised her kids and ran a small business. She served on the school board and as the local tax assessor, a job no one else in town wanted. But in 1991, when she was approached about running for State Senate, she jumped at the chance.

She scored a remarkable upset, defeating a popular Republican, and went on to serve four terms in the Maine Senate. But throughout her political career, from Augusta to Washington and beyond, the lessons she learned on North Haven have always been her guide: Be accountable to your neighbors, and always use your common sense.

Chellie Johnson (she has legally changed her name from "Rochelle") was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1955, the youngest of four children. Her father, Harry, worked in advertising and her mother, Dorothy, was a nurse. Chellie moved to Maine as a teenager, attended the University of Southern Maine, and graduated from the College of the Atlantic, in Bar Harbor. After college, she moved to North Haven, an island town of 350 people twelve miles off the coast of Rockland, to raise her family and make a living.

Chellie has worked hard throughout her life - as a mother, as a farmer, as a small business owner, and in politics. She knows how difficult it can be to meet payroll and run a business in a small, rural community. Right after college, Chellie and her husband, Charlie, spent several years running a small farm and selling produce locally. In 1981, she started North Island Yarn, a cottage industry of local knitters, with a retail store on the island. The business expanded quickly, becoming North Island Designs, and employed as many as ten local workers in peak seasons. The business sold knitting kits and pattern books nationwide through 500 retail stores and 100,000 mail order catalogues. She sold the business in 1993.Today, in addition to her political life, Chellie co-owns and helps manage Nebo Lodge, a bed & breakfast and restaurant on North Haven, which she started with several partners in 2006.

Chellie was elected to the Maine State Senate in 1992, representing Knox County. In 1996, Chellie was chosen by her peers to be the Maine Senate Majority Leader. She helped lead the Senate for four more years, until leaving office due to term limits. As a Senator, she fought for economic and social justice, taking on powerful adversaries - most notably the pharmaceutical lobby. In her last session, Pingree sponsored one of the nation's first prescription drug pricing bills, MaineRX. After a legal fight that led all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, the bill became law, and has since been a model for states around the country working to lower prescription drug prices.

Chellie also sponsored the successful "Parents as Scholars" program, a national model for welfare reform, which continues to help working Maine parents gain access to education to help them achieve a better life for their families. She led successful efforts to protect Maine's environment, for corporate accountability, to protect workers, to promote a women's right to choose, and in support of Maine's small businesses. As a state Senator, Chellie was also a founding member of the Maine Economic Growth Council.Pingree's leadership in Maine politics led to numerous international appointments. She traveled to Hungary as an Eisenhower Exchange Fellow, served as a member of the White House delegation to observe elections in Bosnia, and was a member of a U.S. delegation to Northern Ireland, working with women political leaders there.

After being term-limited from the Maine Senate in 2000, Pingree challenged incumbent U.S. Senator Susan Collins in 2002. As one of the few outspoken opponents of the Iraq War running for U.S. Senate, Chellie mounted a strong, but ultimately unsuccessful campaign.

From 2003 to 2007, Chellie served as the National President and CEO of Common Cause, a non-partisan citizen activist group with nearly 300,000 members and 35 state chapters. Common Cause's mission is to help citizens make their voices heard in the political process and to hold their elected leaders accountable to the public interest. Under Chellie's leadership, Common Cause increased its membership and diversified its agenda to include limiting media concentration and consolidation, promoting Net Neutrality, and election reform, while continuing to pursue its traditional goals of campaign finance reform and oversight of government ethics and accountability.

In 2008, Chellie was elected to Congress from Maine’s 1st Congressional District—the first woman elected to Congress from that District. She has previously served on the House Rules Committee and Armed Services Committee. She currently sits on the powerful House Appropriations Committee, serving on the Subcommittee on Agriculture, Subcommittee on Interior and the Environment, and Subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans Affairs. She also has a seat on the House Agriculture Committee.  

Among other issues important to Mainers, Chellie has been an advocate in Congress for reforming federal policy to better support the diverse range of American agriculture—including sustainable, organic, and locally focused farming—as well as to reduce food waste. Many provisions from comprehensive legislation she introduced to make these reforms were passed in both the 2014 and 2018 Farm Bills. She received a 2017 James Beard Leadership Award for her national leadership in food system reform.

Chellie has also been recognized for her leadership on a number of other issues, including assisting survivors of military sexual trauma, strengthening the creative and arts economy, and helping coastal communities address threats to their future.

Chellie has three grown children--Asa, Cecily, and Hannah, former Speaker of the Maine House of Representatives.

Haley Stevens
Michigan-11
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Haley Stevens

Congresswoman Haley Stevens grew up in Rochester Hills, Michigan, and graduated from Seaholm High School in Birmingham. She earned a master’s degree in social policy and philosophy and a bachelor’s degree in political science and philosophy from American University.

Before being elected to Congress, Congresswoman Stevens served as the Chief of Staff to the U.S. Auto Rescue Task Force, the federal initiative responsible for saving General Motors, Chrysler, and 200,000 Michigan Jobs. She also played a key role in setting up the Office of Recovery for Automotive Communities and Workers, and the White House Office of Manufacturing Policy. After serving in the Obama Administration, Congresswoman Stevens worked in a manufacturing research lab focused on the future of work in the digital age.

Congresswoman Haley Stevens sits on the House Committee on Education & Labor, and the House Committee on Science, Space & Technology, where she also serves as Chairwoman of the Research & Technology Subcommittee. On these Committees, Congresswoman Stevens works to protect access to healthcare, promote manufacturing, expand educational opportunity, stand up for workers’ rights, and increase investment in critical research and development. 

Congresswoman Stevens resides in Rochester Hills and attends Kensington Church in Troy.

Debbie Dingell
Michigan-12
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Debbie Dingell

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell represents the 12th District of Michigan in the U.S. House of Representatives.  Before being elected to Congress, Debbie was the Chair of the Wayne State University (WSU) Board of Governors.  An active civic and community leader, she is a recognized national advocate for women and children.

For more than 30 years Debbie served one of Michigan’s largest employers, the General Motors (GM) Corporation, where she was President of the GM Foundation and a senior executive responsible for public affairs.   In her commitment to job creation, Debbie led the effort to bring the 10,000 Small Businesses initiative, a $20 million partnership designed to help create jobs and economic growth, to southeast Michigan. She is a past chair of the Manufacturing Initiative at the American Automotive Policy Council.

With values instilled by her Catholic education, Debbie’s activism took root in her passion for issues important to women and children.  She successfully fought to have women included in federally-funded health research, and advocated for greater awareness of issues directly related to women’s health, including breast cancer and women's heart health. She is a founder and past chair of the National Women’s Health Resource Center and the Children's Inn at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  She has served on numerous boards related to women’s issues including the advisory boards for the NIH Panel for Women’s Research, the Michigan Women's Economic Club, the Susan G. Komen Foundation, and the board of the Michigan Women's Foundation.  She was a co-founder of both the first Race for the Cures in Michigan and in Washington, D.C.

Debbie has led a number of efforts and initiatives related to young people and education stemming from her role as a WSU Governor and co-chair of the Children's Leadership Council, a business-led advocacy group that promotes investment in early childhood education.  She chaired the Michigan Infant Mortality Task Force, the Baby Your Baby public education campaign that reduced infant mortality rates in Michigan, and has served on the board of Michigan’s Children, the only statewide independent voice working to ensure that public policies are made in the best interest of children from cradle to career. She was appointed by Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm to serve on the Early Childhood Investment Corporation and the Cherry Commission on Higher Education and Economic Growth.

Much of Debbie's recent work has been focused on ethical issues and social responsibility as they relate to government and business. She co-chaired One United Michigan, which sought to preserve and support programs that ensure equal opportunity in Michigan. She chairs the Metropolitan Affairs Coalition, a statewide organization that brings business, labor and government together to find commonality on issues.  She continues to serve on the Parade Company board of directors of which she is past chair, where she helped save America’s Thanksgiving Parade, an important Detroit tradition.  A known “bridge-builder,” she continues to promote and lead efforts toward greater understanding among people of differing points of views and backgrounds.

Debbie is a respected voice in Michigan.  She co-hosted Detroit Public Television’s “Am I Right,” regularly served as a panelist on “Flashpoint,” a public affairs program on WDIV-TV4 Detroit, and was named one of the 100 Most Influential Women in Michigan by Crain’s Detroit Business.

Debbie resides in Dearborn.  She holds both a B.S.F.S. in Foreign Services and an M.S. in Liberal Studies from Georgetown University.

Dan Kildee
Michigan-5
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Dan Kildee

Congressman Dan Kildee holds various leadership positions in Congress. As Chief Deputy Whip—part of the Democratic leadership team in the 116th Congress—he acts as an important liaison among Members of Congress and the leadership to build support for Democratic priorities and legislation.

Congressman Kildee serves on the prestigious Ways and Means Committee, the oldest and one of the most powerful committees in the U.S. House of Representatives. On the committee, Congressman Kildee works to lower the costs of health care premiums and prescription drugs, protect Social Security and Medicare, negotiate fair trade deals, and create a tax system that benefits working families, not just the richest corporations. The committee also has vast jurisdiction over important programs including Unemployment Insurance, enforcement of child support laws, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, and foster care and adoption programs.

Before being elected to Congress, Congressman Kildee co-founded and served as the president of the Center for Community Progress, a national non-profit organization focused on urban land reform and revitalization.

He also founded Michigan’s first land bank – the Genesee County Land Bank – which is responsible for tens of millions of dollars in redevelopment in Flint. The Genesee County Land Bank later served as a model for over 100 other land banks across the nation.

Previously, Congressman Dan Kildee served as the Genesee County Treasurer, on the Genesee County Board of Commissioners, and on the Flint Board of Education. Additionally, he worked for eight years at the Whaley Children’s Center, a residential treatment facility in Flint for children who have experienced trauma and abuse.

Congressman Kildee resides in Flint Township with his wife, Jennifer. They have two children, Kenneth and Katy. Dan’s oldest son, Ryan, and his wife Ginger are the parents of their first two grandchildren, Caitlin and Colin.

Fred Upton
Michigan-6
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Fred Upton

Congressman Fred Upton is proud to represent the common-sense values of Southwest Michigan’s Sixth Congressional District. A diverse section of the state that stretches from the shores of Lake Michigan, the Sixth District is home to key industries that range from agriculture to auto parts manufacturing to high-tech biomedical innovation centers. It includes all of Berrien, Cass, Kalamazoo, St. Joseph and Van Buren counties, and most of Allegan County.

Prior to his election to Congress, Fred worked for President Ronald Reagan in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). While at OMB, he learned from President Reagan’s example that it does not matter who gets the credit, as long as the job gets done. That has been Fred’s approach since he was first elected to Congress in 1986 and continues today.

From 2010 to 2016, Fred was selected by his House colleagues to serve as Chairman of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. This pivotal committee has jurisdiction over matters concerning energy, healthcare, the environment, telecommunications, commerce, manufacturing, and trade, as well as oversight and investigations. Hard work and bipartisan success was a staple during Fred’s tenure as chairman of the committee. Under Fred’s leadership, the Committee passed 354 legislative measures through the House and saw 202 of those signed into law by the president. Fred currently serves as the top Republican leader of the Subcommittee on Energy, which has jurisdiction over national energy policy.

Fred’s top priorities remain job creation, economic growth, and working to help all residents of Southwest Michigan live longer, better lives.

Fred has long been an advocate for a greater emphasis on biomedical research to improve the public health. In 2014, along with U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colorado, Fred launched the 21st Century Cures initiative. This bipartisan effort aims to bring researchers, industry, and patients together to speed up the discovery, development, and delivery of life-saving cures. The pursuit of these 21st century cures also supports Southwest Michigan employers and jobs by ensuring the United States remains the world leader in medical innovation. Marking the culmination of a three-year journey, President Obama signed the 21st Century Cures Act into law on December 13, 2016.

Fred’s leadership on Great Lakes issues has earned him a local and national reputation. As an active member of the Great Lakes Task Force, Fred has an extensive, bipartisan record working to protect our Great Lakes. A leader on keeping BP from dumping pollutants into Lake Michigan, Fred has also been a long-time leader in preventing Asian Carp and other invasive species from entering our waterways, and working on bipartisan legislation to keep harmful pollutants like synthetic plastic microbeads from getting into Lake Michigan. Fred has also fought for consistent funding for the critical Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI). Fred will continue to protect our treasured Great Lakes so that generations to come can enjoy their beauty.

Fred has worked tirelessly to ensure Southwest Michigan remains a hub of commerce and innovation. Our local economy and jobs remain a top priority. From the Harbor Shores project in St. Joseph/Benton Harbor and working to ensure the St. Joseph Harbor remains dredged and operational, to the widening of I-94 and working with local leaders on the Kalamazoo River Superfund cleanup. Fred understands that when Southwest Michigan is connected and its residents empowered, it thrives.

Fred, and his staff, works hard to ensure that Michigan service members, veterans, and their families receive the benefits they have earned through years of service. From improving health care for our veterans, to improving the disability benefit system or getting veterans back to work, and providing overdue service medals, Fred has a strong record of supporting our brave veterans and their families. Additionally, Fred has been working closely with the U.S. Department of Defense to get the Missile Defense Agency Project approved for the Fort Custer Training Center.

Fred has led the effort to ensure seniors keep access to their physicians and low-income children keep their insurance coverage. In 2015, the president signed into law H.R. 2, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act, which permanently fixes the broken Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate, strengthens Medicare in the long-term, extends federal funding for community health centers, and extends the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) that covers approximately 100,000 children in Michigan. More recently, Fred supported the efforts to reauthorize CHIP funding for six years – the longest and most generous reauthorization in the programs history. This legislation was signed into law in January of 2017.

Fred strongly supports an ‘All-of-the-Above’ energy strategy that focuses on American energy development, emerging clean energy technologies, and traditional energy. This focus keeps costs low for families and businesses and helps America become free from reliance on foreign oil. Fred is also fighting to bring a halt to costly federal rules and regulations that needlessly slow private-sector growth. Fred believes in ensuring that the federal government remains limited, transparent, and accountable to Southwest Michiganders.

Fred, and his staff, remain ever-committed to helping residents of Southwest Michigan who run into snags dealing directly with the federal government. He maintains two constituent district offices, located in Benton Harbor/St. Joseph (269-982-1986) and Kalamazoo (269-385-0039) as well as Washington D.C. (202-225-3761), where dedicated caseworkers serve as intermediaries to help them navigate the system. Learn more here.

Fred was born on April 23, 1953, and holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. He and his wife, Amey, have two adult children.

Elissa Slotkin
Michigan-8
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Elissa Slotkin

Representative Elissa Slotkin is honored to serve the residents of Michigan’s 8th Congressional District, a district that includes Ingham, Livingston, and North Oakland Counties.

Rep. Slotkin has spent her career in national service. After the 9/11 terrorist attacks, which took place during her first week of graduate school in New York City, Rep. Slotkin knew that national service would define her career. She was recruited by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) to be a Middle East analyst and went on to devote her career to protecting the United States from national security threats. In her role at the CIA, Rep. Slotkin worked alongside the U.S. military during three tours in Iraq as a militia expert. In between her tours in Iraq, Rep. Slotkin held various defense and intelligence positions under President Bush and President Obama, including roles at the White House and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. In 2011, Rep. Slotkin took a senior position at the Pentagon and, until January 2017, she served as Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. In this role, Rep. Slotkin oversaw policy on Russia, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa at the Pentagon and participated in negotiations on some of the country’s most pressing national security issues.

It is this same mission-focus that Rep. Slotkin brings to issues affecting citizens of Michigan’s 8th congressional district. For Rep. Slotkin, this means ensuring that everyone has access to healthcare they can afford, lowering the price of prescription drugs, protecting access to clean water and Michigan’s Great Lakes, and returning decency and integrity to politics. Rep. Slotkin’s background in national security contributes to the urgency and passion she brings to increasing government integrity and accountability and passing campaign finance reform. To learn more about Rep. Slotkin’s legislative priorities, click here.

A third-generation Michigander, Rep. Slotkin spent her early life on her family farm in Holly, Michigan. The generations of Slotkins before her worked in the family business, Hygrade Foods, which was headquartered in Detroit and produced iconic foods loved by Michiganders, like the Ballpark Frank first sold at Detroit’s Tiger Stadium. The values that made the family business successful instilled in Rep. Slotkin an enduring commitment to integrity, decency, and hard work that guided her to a career of service. The Slotkin family business is well represented in Rep. Slotkin’s office, with hot dog figurines and artwork proudly displayed. Rep. Slotkin attended Cornell University (BA) and Columbia University in the City of New York (MA).

Rep. Slotkin’s home is her family farm in Holly. Rep. Slotkin’s husband, Dave, is a retired Army colonel who served for 30 years as an Apache helicopter pilot. Her two stepdaughters have pursued their own lives of service, one as a physician and the other as a new Army officer.  

Angie Craig
Minnesota-2
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Angie Craig

Rep. Angie Craig represents Minnesota’s Second Congressional District. She is fighting for working families - and for a Minnesota where every member of every family gets a fair shot. That means an opportunity for an outstanding education, career skills and technical training for 21st century jobs of the future, and a better life. She will work with anyone to improve the lives and opportunities of Minnesotans.

Rep. Craig learned the value of hard work from her mother, a single mom who raised three children while earning her teaching degree. She too worked two jobs to help put herself through college. Years later, she moved to Minnesota and fell in love with the strong communities and quality of life. She and her wife Cheryl Greene have four sons – three in college or tech school and one in high school. They live in Eagan, Minnesota. She is a small business investor, the former head of Global HR for a major Minnesota manufacturer, and a former newspaper reporter.

In Congress, Rep. Craig is fighting to make sure career skills and technical education is an option for every young person; to lower the cost of healthcare and to work toward a solution that expands healthcare to many more Americans; for infrastructure investments that benefit our communities – big and small; and for policies that reward people for their hard work – especially family farmers and small business owners. She plans to pursue these priorities through her appointments on the House Committees on Agriculture,  Transportation & Infrastructure, and Small Business. But she knows she can’t do it alone. Through regular town hall meetings and work in the district, Rep. Craig hopes to hear from you directly about how she can help deliver economic opportunity to every Minnesotan. 

Collin Peterson
Minnesota-7
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Collin Peterson

Collin Peterson was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from the Seventh Congressional District of Minnesota in 1990. His primarily rural and agricultural district reaches from the Canadian border in the north, almost to the Iowa state line in the south; along Minnesota’s border with North and South Dakota. Peterson is Chairman of the House Committee on Agriculture, which has jurisdiction over a wide range of agriculture and rural development issues, including the Farm Bill, renewable energy, disaster assistance, nutrition, crop insurance, conservation, rural development, international trade, futures market regulation, animal and plant health, agricultural research, bioterrorism, forestry, and others. Peterson also serves on the Veterans' Affairs Committee.

Congressman Peterson grew up on a farm near Glyndon, Minnesota and was educated in the local public schools.  He graduated from Minnesota State University-Moorhead in 1966 with a double major in Business Administration and Accounting, and also served in the North Dakota National Guard from 1963 to 1969.  Before being elected to the House of Representatives, he was a Certified Public Accountant and small business owner in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota, and also served for ten years in the Minnesota State Senate.

In the 1960’s, Peterson also found time to play guitar and sing with a band known as “Collin and the Establishment.”  He is a musician, and in recent years he has performed with Willie Nelson at Farm Aid concerts, jazz legend Lonnie Brooks, with several other Members of Congress at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, and with rock guitarist Jeff “Skunk” Baxter at several Washington, D.C. venues. He is a member of the American Legion’s Ninth District Band.

Peterson has organized and played in Congressional rock bands, including The Amendments and the Second Amendments. He and his colleagues have performed at charity events in Washington DC. The Second Amendments also performed for U.S. troops in Germany, Kuwait, Iraq, Pakistan and Afghanistan and performed at WE Fest in Minnesota and Farm Aid in Illinois.

Peterson is a private pilot who often flies his own single-engine plane to get around his large district and visit with his constituency. He also is an avid outdoorsman who enjoys hunting and fishing whenever time permits.

During his public service career, Peterson has been a strong advocate for farmers and small business owners, and a leader on both federal tax policy and conservation issues. He has been a leader on the last four Farm Bills passed by Congress. He is a founding member of the conservative Democrats’ “Blue Dog” Coalition, which continues to be a voice for fiscal responsibility and pragmatic government policies. Peterson is the most senior member of the House Committee on Agriculture and currently serves as its Chairman. He previously served as Chairman in the 110th and 111th Congresses.

Peterson has taken a leading role in Congress promoting biofuels as a homegrown way for America to meet its growing energy needs, and he has introduced legislation to expand biofuel production and use. Peterson’s leadership led to the successful passage of the 2008 Farm Bill, which preserved the safety net for farmers while making historic new investments in food, farm and conservation programs that are priorities for all Americans.

Pete Stauber
Minnesota-8
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Pete Stauber

Congressman Pete Stauber is a Duluth native, currently serving his first term in Congress as the Representative from Minnesota’s Eighth Congressional District. Congressman Stauber believes that Northern Minnesota deserves strong, principled leadership in Washington, D.C. and is focused on creating jobs, protecting the interests of taxpayers, and strengthening national security.

Congressman Stauber has a remarkable record of public service. Prior to his time in Congress, Stauber worked as a St. Louis County Commissioner, City Councilor in Hermantown, and Duluth police officer for over two decades.

During his tenure as a police officer, Stauber was the victim of two violent gun crimes. In 1995, he was shot in the head while off-duty by a criminal with multiple past offenses. A few years later, a suspect pulled the trigger at point blank range, and by the grace of God, the gun malfunctioned. His experience as a police officer solidified his view that more must be done to create safer communities as well as protect law abiding gun owners.

Congressman Stauber graduated from Denfeld High School and received a scholarship to play hockey at Lake Superior State University. During his sophomore year, Stauber became team captain and led the Lakers to a Division 1 National Championship. Following college graduation, he went on to play hockey with the Detroit Red Wings Organization.

Congressman Stauber lives in Hermantown with his wife Jodi, an Iraq War veteran and the first female Command Chief of the 148th Fighter Wing. Together, they are the proud parents of four children: Levi, Luke, Isaac, and Addilynn.

Ann Wagner
Missouri-2
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Ann Wagner

Ann Wagner’s career is both deep and broad in service to her hometown, state and nation with over 30 years of work in the private sector, community and public service, and the political arena.

The 2nd District has always been home for Ann. It is where she and her husband of over thirty years, Ray, grew up, went to school, raised their children, work, volunteer, and go to church. This community has given her extraordinary opportunities to make a difference.

At an early age, Ann started working in the family business, a retail carpet store called Carpetime in Manchester. Working beside her parents she learned the value of a dollar, a strong work ethic, honesty, integrity, and that government should stay off the backs and out of the way of hard-working Americans trying to make a living.

Ann then took that experience to the University of Missouri-Columbia and received her Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis in Logistics. After college, Ann went to work in the private sector and held management positions at Hallmark Cards in Kansas City and Ralston Purina in St. Louis.

Ann’s most important jobs, however, have always been as a wife, mother, and now grandmother. Ann and Ray have three children: Raymond, an Army Captain who recently welcomed his first child, Isabella, into the world with his wife Julia; Stephen, a Client Services Manager for a St. Louis area financial management company; and Mary Ruth, a recent college graduate who moved back to the 2nd District and is working as a Business Development Coordinator.

Ann Wagner’s public service began at the grassroots level. She served for nine years as a local committeewoman in Lafayette Township and went on to Chair the Missouri Republican Party, delivering historic Republican gains. She also served as Co-Chairman of the Republican National Committee during the first term of President George W. Bush.

In 2005, following nomination by President Bush and confirmation by the U.S. Senate, Ann was sworn in as the 19th U.S. Ambassador to Luxembourg by Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. She served as U.S. Ambassador for four years before returning to her home in Ballwin, Missouri.

Ann then decided to put her own name on the ballot and won her first Congressional race with over 60% of the vote, receiving more votes that election cycle than any other Republican Congressional candidate in Missouri. She took office in January of 2013 and was selected by both her freshman and sophomore class to be their representative on the Elected Leadership Committee.  

As your representative from the 2nd District, Congresswoman Wagner serves as Vice Ranking Member on both the House Financial Services Committee and House Foreign Affairs Committee. She has worked tirelessly to demand transparency and accountability from federal regulators, while continuing to investigate waste, fraud, and abuse. During her time in Congress, Representative Wagner has been committed to regulatory reform, authoring bills such as the Retail Investor Protection Act which protects access to retirement savings for middle class families.

Ann has made combating sex trafficking and online exploitation of women and children major legislative priorities. She authored the SAVE Act, which amended the Federal criminal code to allow prosecutions of those who knowingly advertise sex slavery, along with the Put Trafficking Victims First Act and the Allow States and Victims to Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act (FOSTA). FOSTA became law in April of 2018 and is the most significant anti-trafficking law Congress has passed in nearly 20 years, finally giving local, state, and federal prosecutors the tools they need to hold websites accountable when they profit from the sale of sex trafficking victims.

Sam Graves
Missouri-6
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Sam Graves

Congressman Sam Graves is a lifelong resident of Missouri's Sixth Congressional District. As a small businessman and a sixth-generation family farmer, Sam has spent his life working to make Missouri a better place to live, work, and raise a family.

In Congress, Sam serves as the Ranking Member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. As Ranking Member, Sam leads the Republicans on the Committee as it has jurisdiction over all modes of transportation – our aviation system, highways and bridges, transit and rail transportation, pipelines, and maritime and waterborne transportation. Sam’s role in transportation is critical as he works on behalf of Missouri’s 34,000 highway miles and 10,400 bridges in need of maintenance and repair as well as the 6th Congressional District’s two major rivers – the Missouri and the Mississippi.

Sam is also a member of the House Committee on Armed Services. Missouri has a $15 billion military footprint and plays a critical role in ensuring our troops have the resources they need. Sam remains determined to protect Missouri’s various military installations and all of the brave men and women who serve in uniform.

Congressman Graves was born in Tarkio, Missouri on November 7, 1963. He graduated from Tarkio High School in 1982 and attended college at the University of Missouri-Columbia, where he received his degree in Agronomy from the School of Agriculture.

In 1992, Sam won his first race for State Representative. In 1994, he was elected State Senator for the 12th Senatorial District and was subsequently re-elected in 1998.

Sam’s leadership has been recognized by organizations like the Missouri Chamber of Commerce, the Missouri Farm Bureau, the Missouri Hospital Association and the National Federation of Independent Businesses. As a father, grandfather, farmer, businessman, and former State legislator, Sam knows the values, hopes, and beliefs of the hard-working people of the Sixth District, and continues to work tirelessly for Missouri families in the United States House of Representatives.

GK Butterfield
North Carolina-1
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GK Butterfield

Congressman G. K. Butterfield is a life-long resident of eastern North Carolina. Raised in Wilson, Congressman Butterfield spent his formative years attending Charles H. Darden High School and worked tirelessly in the Civil Rights Movement as a young adult. His parents were Dr. & Mrs. G. K. Butterfield, Sr. His father practiced dentistry for 50 years and served as one of North Carolina's first black elected officials since Reconstruction. His mother was a classroom teacher for 48 years.

Congressman Butterfield graduated from college and law school at North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina. After earning his law degree, Congressman Butterfield founded a law practice in Wilson and served the community in that capacity for 13 years. He is best known for his successful litigation of voting rights cases that resulted in the election of African-American elected officials throughout eastern North Carolina.

In 1988, Congressman Butterfield was elected as Resident Superior Court judge. In this role, he presided over civil and criminal court in 46 counties of North Carolina. For two years, he served on the North Carolina Supreme Court by appointment of the governor. Butterfield retired from the judiciary after 15 years of service and successfully ran for Congress. He was elected to serve the First District of North Carolina in the U.S. House of Representatives in a special election on July 20, 2004, where he continues to serve today.

In Congress, Butterfield is a champion of affordable health care, education, investments in rural communities, veterans, renewable energies, and federal programs that support low-income and middle-class Americans.

Butterfield serves in the Democratic leadership as Chief Deputy Whip and is a past Chair of the Congressional Black Caucus (114th Congress). He sits on the influential Committee on Energy & Commerce where he serves as the Vice Chair of the Subcommittee on Health. In addition, he serves as a member of the Subcommittees of Communications and Technology and Energy. In the 116th Congress, Congressman Butterfield also sits on the Committee on House Administration where serves as a member of the Subcommittee on Elections.

Congressman Butterfield is a life-long member of Jackson Chapel First Missionary Baptist Church. He is a veteran of the U.S. Army and a proud father and grandfather.

Alma Adams
North Carolina-12
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Alma Adams

Dr. Alma S. Adams was elected to her third full term representing the 12th Congressional District of North Carolina on November 6, 2018. After winning a special election in November 2014, Congresswoman Adams was sworn in immediately as the 100th woman elected to the 113th Congress.

Representative Adams serves on the Committee on Financial Services; Committee on Education & Labor and the Committee on Agriculture. She holds several leadership roles as Chairwoman of the Committee on Education & Labor’s Subcommittee on Workforce Protections and Vice Chairwoman to the Committee on Agriculture. Congresswoman Adams serves on the Workforce Protections and Higher Education and Workforce Investment (Committee on Education and Labor); Nutrition, Oversight, and Department Operations (Committee on Agriculture); Diversity and Inclusion (Committee on Financial Services). One of her outstanding legislative accomplishments is the enactment of H.R. 5363, the Fostering Undergraduate Talent by Unlocking Resources for Education (FUTURE) Act that permanently provides funding totaling $255 million a year for all Minority-Serving Institutions, including $85 million for HBCUs.

Representative Adams has previously served on the Joint Economic Committee and in several leadership positions including Assistant Whip for the Democratic Caucus, Vice Ranking Member of the Small Business Committee, and ranking member of the Small Business Subcommittee on Investigations, Oversight, and Regulation. The Congresswoman is a co-founder of the Black Maternal Health Caucus with Rep. Lauren Underwood of Illinois and the founder and co-chair of the Congressional Bipartisan Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Caucus to promote bipartisan legislation that supports HBCUs and their graduates.

Throughout her career, Representative Adams has promoted quality education for all students, spearheading numerous pieces of legislation to boost funds for Historically Black Colleges and Universities. She has also introduced legislation to provide nutritious breakfast in schools and supports increased pay for teachers. For 40 years, Dr. Adams taught Art at Bennett College. While at Bennett, she led the effort to increase student civic participation coining the phrase “Bennett Belles are Voting Belles” and organizing annual marches to the polls. As a former educator, Rep. Adams has dedicated her career to improving the lives of young people and her community. She is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the North Carolina A&T State University Human Rights Medal, the highest award presented by her alma mater to an individual who fights against social injustice and helps improve the world.

In 1994, Dr. Adams was appointed by her peers to serve in the North Carolina House District 26 seat. She went on to serve ten terms in the state House. During her tenure, she rose to become the chair of the North Carolina Legislative Black Caucus and was instrumental in passing legislation that improved the climate for quality affordable health care in the state. Representative Adams also pioneered the Displaced Homemakers Bill and successfully spearheaded the state’s first minimum wage increase in nine years.

Before serving as a member of the North Carolina General Assembly, Congresswoman Adams served nine years on the Greensboro City Council. Throughout her service to the second district in Greensboro, Dr. Adams worked to create safe and affordable housing and for the revitalization of neighbors. She began her political career in the 1980’s by becoming the first African American woman ever elected to the Greensboro City School Board. It was then that she made a lifetime commitment to effecting social change in her community and beyond.

Congresswoman Adams has one daughter, Linda Jeanelle Lindsay, one son Billy E. Adams II, and four grandchildren: Joslyn Lindsay, Aaron Lindsay, Billy E. Adams III, and Miracle Sumner. Adams graduated from North Carolina A&T State University in 1968 and received her master’s degree in Art Education in 1972. She earned her Ph.D. in Art Education and Multicultural Education from The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio in 1981.

Jeff Fortenberry
Nebraska-1
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Jeff Fortenberry

Jeff Fortenberry represents Nebraska’s First Congressional District in the United States House of Representatives. He is a member of the House Appropriations Committee, which is responsible for the expenditures of the United States government. He serves as the Ranking Member on the House Agriculture Subcommittee and is a member of the State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee. In Congress, Jeff serves as co-chair of the Nuclear Security Working Group, co-chair of the International Conservation Caucus, and co-chair of the Congressional Study Group on Europe.

Prior to serving in Congress, Jeff worked as a publishing industry executive in Lincoln, where he also served on the Lincoln City Council from 1997-2001. Jeff also has significant personal experience in small business, public policy analysis, and economic development. Jeff earned a bachelor's degree in economics and two master's degrees, one in public policy. He and his wife Celeste live in Lincoln and have five daughters. His work in Congress is rooted in the belief that the strength of our nation depends on the strength of our families and communities.

Chris Pappas
New Hampshire-1
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Chris Pappas

For Congressman Chris Pappas, public service has always been about finding ways to give back to the community that has given him so much. A lifelong resident of Manchester, New Hampshire, Chris was born into a proud Greek-American family. After graduating from Harvard, Chris returned home where he began a career in public service while helping run the 103 year-old family restaurant where he started scooping ice cream and bussing tables at age 14.

In Congress, Chris focuses on the issues that matter most to Granite Staters, including improving access to health care, lowering the high cost of prescription drugs, combating the addiction epidemic, and protecting our environment and drinking water. 

As the Chair of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations for the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee, Chris is committed to holding VA leadership accountable while serving our veterans who have sacrificed so much. He is working to protectwhistleblowers who come forward to report waste, fraud, and abuse and to ensure that more veterans can access quality care in their communities. Chris also serves on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee where he is fighting to modernize our nation’s infrastructure and invest in projects that will create jobs and improve quality of life in New Hampshire. 

Before entering the U.S. House of Representatives, Chris served as a member of the state’s Executive Council. In this role he worked with governors of both parties to implement Medicaid expansion, expand treatment and recovery services, approve funding for family planning providers, and support renewable energy and infrastructure projects.

Ann McLane Kuster
New Hampshire-2
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Ann McLane Kuster

Ann McLane Kuster was first elected to the House of Representatives to represent New Hampshire’s Second Congressional District in November of 2012, and she was sworn into office on January 3, 2013. She came to Washington determined to put an end to the gridlock, and during her time in office she has established a record of working across the aisle to get things done for her constituents in the Granite State.  

Prior to taking office, Annie served as a longtime community activist and adoption attorney who focused her career on increasing opportunity for Granite State families. A strong advocate for seniors, students, veterans, and women and their families, Annie has always been committed to fighting for the issues that matter most to Granite Staters, like increasing access to higher education and affordable health care, and cutting waste, fraud, and abuse in the federal government to ensure our taxpayer dollars are used wisely. Annie played a key role in creating New Hampshire’s UNIQUE College Savings Program to help parents save for their children’s education, as well as the Medication Bridge Program to provide medicine to low-income families.

Since taking office, Annie has prioritized efforts to facilitate the creation of good jobs and to increase economic opportunity for every New Hampshire family. Annie knows small businesses serve as the backbone of our local economy, and she’s visited dozens of businesses throughout the Granite State. These visits helped inform the drafting of her 2018 Jobs and Opportunity Agenda, a blueprint of legislative proposals to expand economic opportunity in New Hampshire by bolstering apprenticeship and vocational training programs, addressing the out of control costs of higher education, investing in the expansion of infrastructure, increasing affordable housing, and supporting working families with paid family leave and childcare programs. Additionally, Annie has been hosting a series of job fairs throughout the Second District, where Granite State job seekers and employers can meet and connect.

In January 2019, Annie was appointed to the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which has a wide jurisdiction over many critical issues. In this role, she will continue her efforts to improve access to affordable and quality medical services, address the growing threat of climate change, protect our environment, and expand access to broadband internet.

The daughter of a WWII veteran and prisoner of war, Annie is also dedicated to ensuring our nation’s veterans have the support they need to make a smooth and successful transition back to civilian life. As a member of the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee for six years, Annie pushed a number of legislative initiatives to improve the lives of veterans across the country.   She worked across the aisle with her colleagues on the Committee to advance the VA Mission Act, which was signed into law by President Trump in June 2018. This legislation will increase the number of veterans who are able to receive care in their community through the Choice Program and includes a provision Annie fought for that provides special eligibility for community care to veterans in a state without a full-service VA hospital, such as New Hampshire.

In addition, Annie is committed to protecting the programs Granite State seniors count on, such as Medicare, Social Security, and medical research funding for diseases that affect older Americans. With her late mother, who suffered from Alzheimer’s Disease, Annie coauthored a book entitled “The Last Dance: Facing Alzheimer’s with Love and Laughter.” Before taking office, Annie and her father toured the state speaking out about Alzheimer’s Disease and the burdens it places on families and caregivers. In Congress, Annie has championed legislation both to increase funding for research on finding a cure to this deadly disease, and to provide vital support for caregivers who work full-time looking after their loved ones. She has also held roundtable discussions on the challenges associated with looking after people who are suffering from Alzheimer’s.

Annie graduated from Dartmouth College in 1978 as part of the College’s third class that included women students, and from Georgetown University Law Center in 1984. Annie is a member of the American Academy of Adoption Attorneys, and before her election to Congress she maintained a private adoption practice in which she helped hundreds of New Hampshire families adopt children.

Annie was born and raised in Concord, New Hampshire. Annie’s late mother, former State Senator Susan McLane, was a pioneer for women in New Hampshire politics. Her late father, Malcolm McLane, was Mayor of Concord, a New Hampshire Executive Councilor, and one of the state’s most prominent attorneys for over 50 years.

Annie and her husband Brad, an environmental lawyer, now live nearby in Hopkinton where they raised their two sons, Zach and Travis.

Donald Norcross
New Jersey-1
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Donald Norcross

Born and raised in South Jersey, Donald is committed to improving the lives of working families by focusing on the issues that matter most to them: raising wages and strengthening our economy, ensuring affordable access to a high-quality education, and supporting the brave men and women that protect our nation and our neighborhoods.

He knows firsthand what it’s like to be a single parent having to balance work, family life and a checkbook. Early in Donald’s career, he worked for minimum wage, and when construction work was slow or he was injured on the job, he was thankful for unemployment and disability insurance. These on-the-job experiences shape his work in Congress. Now, his top priority is raising the federal minimum wage with common-sense predictability over the next seven years to $15 an hour.

Donald is the only electrician in Congress and worked for years installing and restoring power for New Jersey homes, businesses and industrial sites. He rose through the ranks and eventually became a business agent for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 351, as well as President of the Southern New Jersey AFL-CIO, where he advocated on behalf of thousands of hardworking men and women for nearly 20 years.

As a graduate of both Camden County College and a skilled apprenticeship program, Donald knows we need to advance job-training programs in our country. He also fully understands the value of a quality, affordable education and, as a member of the New Jersey Legislature, he played a key role in historic higher education reforms that established New Jersey as a research and medical education hub.

Donald has developed a reputation as an effective, bipartisan reformer. Among his accomplishments, he led the charge to increase New Jersey’s minimum wage and championed a groundbreaking effort to improve our economy and bring new, family-sustaining jobs to the region.

As the only member of New Jersey’s congressional delegation on the House Committee on Education and Labor, Donald is working to raise wages, protect the middle class, strengthen workplace protections and advance paid leave and equal pay. He also serves on the House Armed Services Committee (HASC), where he focuses on protecting our national security, supporting service members and veterans, and strengthening New Jersey’s Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. He also chairs HASC's Tactical Air and Land Forces (TAL) subcommittee.

Donald was selected by his colleagues to serve as Vice Chair and Liaison to Labor for the Congressional Progressive Caucus, Parliamentarian for the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee, and he was one of four House Democrats appointed to the Joint Select Committee on Multiemployer Pensions to work on solutions for America’s retirement security crisis. Norcross is also the co-founder of the Building Trades Caucus and Vice-Chair of the Bipartisan Task Force to Combat the Opioid Epidemic.

Donald and his wife Andrea live in Camden City and are the proud parents of three grown children and grandparents of two.

Donald Payne
New Jersey-10
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Donald Payne

U.S. Representative Donald M. Payne, Jr. is a Democratic congressman representing New Jersey’s 10th Congressional District, which covers portions of Essex, Hudson, and Union counties. A Newark, New Jersey native, he has served the people of the 10th Congressional District since 2012. Rep. Payne, Jr. is a tireless fighter for New Jersey families, working to create jobs and grow the economy, protect and invest in our children, and ensure the health and safety of our communities.

As Chairman of the Homeland Security Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Recovery, Rep. Payne, Jr. has built a record of achievement in a divided Congress. He introduced two bills that were signed into Public Law by President Barack Obama, including the Department of Homeland Security Interoperable Communications Act of 2015, which ensures that DHS personnel can reliably communicate during emergencies. Rep. Payne, Jr. also introduced a bill to secure public areas of transportation facilities, such as airports. His bill was incorporated into the FAA Reauthorization Act and signed into law in October of 2018.

In 2017, Rep. Payne, Jr. was appointed to serve as a member of the powerful House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. The Committee has jurisdiction over national infrastructure and all modes of transportation, including aviation and mass transit. In 2017, Rep. Payne, Jr. fought for a $900 million appropriation to fund the Gateway Project, a multi-year, multi-billion-dollar project to rebuild transportation infrastructure between New Jersey and New York. He has continued to fight for Gateway and transportation infrastructure projects that benefit the American People. He led the Build America series of convenings to bring together government, industry leaders, small businesses, and women- and minority-owned businesses to increase diversity in federal government contracting projects.

Rep. Payne, Jr. is a strong supporter of the Affordable Care Act, which provides thousands of New Jerseyans with access to high-quality, affordable health care. He has been a strong advocate for investing in and protecting the health of our children and introduced the TEST for Lead Act to protect children from lead-contaminated drinking water in schools. Rep. Payne, Jr. also is a vocal advocate for cancer prevention, introducing the National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month Resolution to raise awareness about the need for regular cancer screenings. In the wake of Hurricane Maria’s devastation in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, Rep. Payne, Jr. repeatedly took to the House floor to advocate for better federal emergency response. He is a leader on gun violence prevention and introduced the Safer Neighborhoods Gun Buyback Act of 2019, which aims to incentivize people to trade in their firearms for prepaid cards.

Rep. Payne, Jr. began his long career in public service when he founded Newark South Ward Junior Democrats, becoming its first president. He also served as an adviser to the YMCA Youth in Government program. He attended Kean College (now Kean University), where he studied graphic arts. He lives in Newark with his wife Beatrice and their triplets, Donald III, Jack, and Yvonne.

Mikie Sherrill
New Jersey-11
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Mikie Sherrill

Congresswoman Mikie Sherrill proudly represents New Jersey’s 11th Congressional District. 

After graduating from the United States Naval Academy in 1994, Congresswoman Sherrill spent almost 10 years on active duty in the United States Navy. She flew missions throughout Europe and the Middle East as a Sea King helicopter pilot, worked on the Battle Watch Floor in the European Theater during the Iraq invasion, and served as a Flag Aide to the Deputy Commander in Chief of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet. Congresswoman Sherrill also served as a Russian policy officer and worked on the implementation of our nuclear treaty obligations and oversaw the relationship between the U.S. Navy and Russian Federation Navy.  

Congresswoman Sherrill attended law school after leaving the Navy in 2003, earning a degree from Georgetown University. She worked as a lawyer and eventually joined the U.S. Attorney’s Office in New Jersey. As an Outreach and Re-entry Coordinator, Congresswoman Sherrill developed programs to help prevent crime in the community. These programs developed trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve, and helped people leaving prison to gain employment, housing, and education in order to restart their lives. As an Assistant U.S. Attorney, Congresswoman Sherrill worked to keep our communities safe, prosecuting federal cases and advising law enforcement on investigations.  

Congresswoman Sherrill holds a Bachelor’s degree from the United States Naval Academy, a Master’s degree in Global History from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a Law degree from Georgetown University. 

Congresswoman Sherrill serves as Freshman Whip for the New Democrat Coalition, and sits on the House Armed Services Committee and the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee. She is the Chairwoman of the Environment Subcommittee for the Science, Space, and Technology Committee.  

Chris Smith
New Jersey-4
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Chris Smith

Elected in 1980, U.S. Rep. Chris Smith (R-Hamilton, N.J.) is currently in his 20th two-year term in the U.S. House of Representatives, and serves residents of the Fourth Congressional District of New Jersey. In the 116th Congress, Mr. Smith serves as a senior member on the Foreign Affairs Committee, and is Ranking Member of its Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organizations Subcommittee. He is the Co-Chair of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission, and Ranking Member of the bipartisan House/Senate/White House Congressional-Executive Commission on China (CECC), serving as chairman twice, and also serves as “Special Representative” on Human Trafficking for the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly. Previously, he served as Co-Chair and highest-ranking House member of the bipartisan House/Senate Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) serving as chairman five times, and served as Chairman of the Veterans Committee (two terms), the Foreign Affairs’ Subcommittee on Human Rights and International Operations, and the Subcommittee on Africa.

Congressman Smith has long chaired a number of bipartisan congressional caucuses (working groups) including the Pro-life (37 years), Autism (21 years, co-founder), Alzheimer’s (19 years, co-founder), Lyme Disease (15 years, co-founder), Spina Bifida (15 years), Human Trafficking (15 years, co-founder), Refugees (15 years), and Combating Anti-Semitism caucuses, and serves on caucuses on Bosnia, Uganda and Vietnam.

According to the independent watchdog organization Govtrack, as of January 2020 Mr. Smith ranks second among all 435 Members of the House over the last two decades in the number of laws authored. According to the official Congress.gov website run by the Library of Congress, Rep. Smith has authored 47 laws. 

In 2019, his Frederick Douglass Trafficking Victims Prevention and Protection Reauthorization Act (House of Representatives 2200 or HR 2200, now Public Law (PL) 115-425)  was signed into law by the President in January 2019. The law authorized $430 million over four years for a comprehensive whole-of-government effort to fight sex and labor trafficking at home and abroad. Rep. Smith is the author of five of America’s comprehensive anti-human trafficking laws, including the landmark Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA, PL 106-386), a groundbreaking law designed to prevent modern-day slavery, protect victims, and enhance civil and criminal penalties against traffickers. He is also the prime sponsor of the law that first reauthorized of the landmark Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), Division B of his TVPA of 2000.

In 2018, after two years of effort, Congressman Smith's Iraq and Syria Genocide Relief and Accountability Act (PL 115-300) (HR 390), to ensure ISIS genocide victims in Iraq and Syria receive humanitarian relief and to hold the perpetrators accountable for their crimes, was enacted into law in December 2018. His bill, HR 6651, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Extension Act of 2018 (PL 115-305), a five-year extension of PEPFAR, was also signed into law that same day. In March of 2018, key provisions from Rep. Smith’s Kevin and Avonte’s Law (HR 4221) were signed into law as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, authorizing $10 million in funding over five years for the Missing Americans Alert Program which helps protect and locate children with Autism and elderly persons with Alzheimer’s who wander. In February of 2018, a legislative provision from Rep. Smith’s Federal Disaster Assistance Nonprofit Fairness Act, to give houses of worship fair access to disaster relief after a federal declaration, was signed into law as part of the Bipartisan Budget Act.

In 2016, Congressman Smith's International Megan’s Law to Prevent Child Exploitation and Other Sexual Crimes Through Advance Notification of Traveling Sex Offenders (PL 114-119) (HR 515), was passed by both houses of Congress and enacted into law to protect children in the U.S. and around the world from convicted pedophiles who travel in or out of the United States unbeknownst to law enforcement officials. The law capped an eight-year effort to finally enact international notification legislation that draws on current federal and Megan’s Laws in all 50 states that require public notice when a sex offender moves into a U.S. neighborhood. Megan lived in the Fourth Congressional District.

Mr. Smith is the author of the Stem Cell Therapeutic and Research Reauthorization Act of 2015 (HR 2820), which was signed into law as PL 114-104 on Dec. 18, 2015 and authorizes funding of $265 million for cord blood and stem cell research and treatment over five years. He wrote the first Stem Cell Therapeutic and Research Act of 2005 (PL 109-129) (HR 2520) which established a nationwide program for ethical research and treatment using umbilical cord blood and bone marrow cells. That landmark law was reauthorized in September, 2010 for another five years.

In 2014, Smith saw over five years of work come to fruition in the House and Senate passage and enactment of his groundbreaking Sean and David Goldman International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act (PL 113-150) (HR 3212), to help bring American children unlawfully taken out of the U.S. to foreign countries back home. Smith’s law was named after a Monmouth County father and son who had been kept illegally separated by a non-custodial parent. Final passage of HR 3212 was July 25, 2014.

Congressman Smith authored the Autism Collaboration, Accountability, Research, Education and Support Act of 2019, which was signed into law in September 2019. It authorized $1.8 billion in funding over five years to help children and adults with autism by funding research, early detection and treatment. Additionally, other three autism laws which Cong. Smith wrote passed in 2000, 2011, 2014 and have funded millions of dollars for autism research. All four have their origins from an Ocean County family managing two children with autism. In 2014, Smith saw his legislation, HR 4631, the Autism Collaboration, Accountability, Research and Education (CARES) Act (PL 113-157) pass the House, then the Senate, and enacted into law. The bill funded $1.3 billion over five years for research into the causes of autism. In October 2011, Smith’s bill, HR 2005, the Combating Autism Reauthorization Act (CARA) of 2011 (PL 112-32), was signed into law, a follow-up to his Autism Statistics, Surveillance, Research, and Epidemiology Act (ASSURE) of 2000 (PL 106-310), HR 274.

Mr. Smith is also the author of 14 enacted veterans laws to help those men and women who served in uniform, including the Homeless Veterans Comprehensive Assistance Act (PL 107-95) (HR 2716), the Veterans Benefits Act of 2003 (PL 108-183) (HR 2297), the Veterans Health Care Improvement Act of 2004 (PL 108-422) (HR 2297), the Veterans Survivor Benefits Improvements Act (PL 107-14) (HR 801) and other veterans laws. His most recent veterans law was the Gold Star Families Voices Act (PL 114-246) (HR 4511), enacted in the 114th Congress in Nov., 2016. He has also authored laws to boost embassy security and promote democracy, religious freedom and health care.

A lifelong New Jersey resident, Chris Smith was born in Rahway and grew up in Iselin. He lives in Hamilton with his wife Marie. He graduated the College of New Jersey with a degree in business administration and spent a semester abroad at Worcester College in England.  Smith was Director of Institutional Sales at his family owned sporting goods company and served as Executive Director of the New Jersey Right to Life Committee.

Josh Gottheimer
New Jersey-5
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Josh Gottheimer

Josh Gottheimer represents New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District in the northernmost part of the state, which includes parts of Bergen, Passaic, Sussex, and Warren counties. He was sworn in on January 3, 2017.

In Congress, Josh serves on the House Financial Services Committee where he works on three Subcommittees: National Security, International Development and Monetary Policy Subcommittee, the Investor Protection, Entrepreneurship, and Capital Markets Subcommittee, and the Diversity and Inclusion Subcommittee.

In February 2017, Josh was elected Co-Chair of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, where he works to bring the group of 24 Democrats and 24 Republicans together across party lines to find areas of agreement on key issues including lowering taxes, cutting burdensome and unnecessary regulation, lowering health insurance premiums, and improving infrastructure to help the American people.

In March 2017, just months after being sworn in, Josh passed his first amendment in the House, which was later signed into law, to accelerate the hiring of post-9/11 veterans at the Department of Veterans Affairs. In April 2018, Josh’s bipartisan FRA Safety Data Improvement Act passed the House by a unanimous vote. The Act brings consistency and the power of big data to help improve rail safety in North Jersey and across the country.

Josh is committed to lowering taxes and getting Fifth District residents a better return on the tax dollars they already send to Washington. Working with Fifth District mayors, councils, first responders, and towns, Josh has helped the Fifth District claw back $290 from Washington for every household in the Fifth District—a 16% increase from what the District has historically received. These dollars help first responders protect the community while offsetting the strain on local budgets and property tax bills.

For his support for pro-growth policies in Congress, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce awarded Josh its Spirit of Enterprise Award. For his consistent work on both sides of the aisle and as Co-Chair of the Problem Solvers Caucus, Josh was recognized as the most bipartisan Democratic freshman Member of Congress by the Lugar Center and the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University.

Josh was raised in North Caldwell, the son of a preschool teacher and a small business owner. Growing up, Josh worked in his father's store and, like your average New Jersey kid, treasured summer vacations at the Jersey Shore. His first concert was at the Meadowlands to see the one and only Bruce Springsteen!

Josh graduated from West Essex High School before attending the University of Pennsylvania, later becoming a Thouron Fellow at Oxford, and then paid his way through Harvard Law School.

After finishing college, Josh went on to work in the Clinton White House as one of the youngest presidential speechwriters in history. Josh wrote speeches on topics ranging from the global economy to technology and innovation to combating crime; he also helped draft two State of the Union Addresses.

After leaving the White House, Josh worked at the Ford Motor Company, where he helped rebuild the iconic auto company’s image and worked on the first American hybrid. Josh was also a Senior Advisor to the Chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and published the book Ripples of Hope: Great American Civil Rights Speeches.

Josh later served as Senior Counselor to the Chairman at the Federal Communications Commission. During his tenure, he was the first Director of Office of Public-Private Initiatives, partnering with private companies to break through roadblocks and solve national problems. These partnerships saved taxpayers money while helping law enforcement, boosting digital education, and creating jobs. Josh worked on cybersecurity, broadband adoption, combating cell phone theft, creating a new public safety emergency alert system, and expanding wireless spectrum. Josh used that experience to help create a nonprofit, JerseyOn, that has expanded access to high-speed internet for low-income New Jersey students to help them compete in the 21st Century economy.

Before running for Congress, Josh worked at Microsoft as General Manager for Corporate Strategy, where focused on the company’s expansion into the cloud, e-commerce, and privacy. He was also a member of both the Ridgewood and New Jersey Chambers of Commerce, the Rutgers Business School Advisory Board, and was a visiting fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology. He also taught history at the University of Pennsylvania.

Josh’s approach to public service is rooted in his experience in both the public and private sectors. During his time working with President Clinton, Senator Frank Lautenberg, and Speaker Thomas Foley, he saw that, by seeking common ground, it’s possible to find a bipartisan path forward without compromising your core values. Josh firmly believes that it doesn’t matter if an idea comes from the Democratic or Republican side of the aisle, only whether it will help the communities and people of the Fifth District.

Josh now lives in Wyckoff, New Jersey with Marla, his wife who was a federal prosecutor, and their two young children, Ellie and Ben.

Frank Pallone
New Jersey-6
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Frank Pallone

On January 3, 2019, Frank Pallone, Jr. was sworn in for his 16th full term in the U.S. House of Representatives. Pallone represents New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District, which covers most of Middlesex County, as well as the Bayshore and oceanfront areas of Monmouth County.

Throughout his tenure in Congress, Pallone's legislative accomplishments have been geared to the protection and restoration of environmental resources and making health care more affordable and accessible.

In 2019, Pallone was sworn in as  the Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which has jurisdiction over issues pertaining to energy, environment, health care, commerce, and telecommunications.

As Ranking Member of the Energy and Commerce Committee during the 114th and 115th Congress’, Pallone led Democrats in passing key health care and environmental bills that were signed into law by President Obama.  In March 2015, Congress passed the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA), which improved the quality of health care for America’s seniors while also lowering costs, ensured that over eight million children and pregnant women continue to have access to health care coverage through the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and provided $8 billion to fund Community Health Centers.

In May 2016, Pallone led Democratic efforts to pass the first comprehensive update to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) since its original passage in 1976. The TSCA update was a long-overdue step forward in protecting families and communities from toxic chemicals. The law will remove dangerous chemicals like lead, mercury and asbestos out of consumer products and the environment.

Pallone also led Democratic negotiations in the House on the 21st Century Cures Act, which was signed into law by President Obama in December 2016.  The Cures law provides billions of dollars in funding for Vice President Biden’s Cancer Moonshot initiative, research to increase our understanding and treatment of brain disorders, and grants for states and communities hard-hit by the opioid abuse crisis.  It also includes important reforms to our broken mental health system.  

Pallone is focused on fighting the opioid epidemic in New Jersey and throughout the country. He led democratic efforts to pass the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) of 2016, which improves the tools available to prescribers to prevent opioid abuse. CARA also expands access to lifesaving opioid overdose reversal drugs and Pallone helped secure an additional $1 billion to combat the opioid epidemic as part of the 21st Century Cures Act, which also passed in the 114th Congress.  21st Century Cures allocates billions towards cutting edge medical research and development of new treatments. 

From 2006 to 2014, Pallone served as the top Democrat on the Committee’s Subcommittee on Health. As Chairman during the 111th Congress, Pallone played a key role in authoring and passing the Affordable Care Act. The landmark law extends health care coverage to millions of Americans, while driving down health care costs and reigning in abusive tactics used by insurance companies to deny medical treatment. 

Pallone was also one of the main authors of food safety reform, which emphasizes prevention and safety measures that help ensure food is safe before it reaches the kitchen tables of millions of families. In the 112th Congress, Pallone introduced the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Reform Act of 2012 to ensure that Americans have access to safe and effective drugs and medical devices.  

Frank Pallone, Jr., was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, where he grew up and still resides. The son of a policeman, Pallone attended local public schools and earned an academic scholarship to Middlebury College. After graduating cum laude from Middlebury in 1973, Pallone received his master's degree in international relations at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He earned his law degree at Rutgers University in 1978, and has been admitted to the bar in four states: New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Florida.

Pallone began his political career in his home city of Long Branch, getting elected to the City Council in 1982 and winning re-election four years later. In 1983, Pallone was elected to the state Senate, representing the Monmouth County coastline. He was re-elected in 1987. During his tenure in the state Legislature, Pallone distinguished himself as an advocate for environmental issues and senior citizen concerns, and prioritized providing constituent services.

On November 8, 1988, Frank Pallone, Jr., was elected to the House of Representatives from New Jersey's former Third District, encompassing parts of Monmouth and Ocean counties. In March 1992, a new Congressional district map for New Jersey was adopted. Portions of the former Third District were merged with parts of two other districts to create the Sixth Congressional District, taking in large portions of Middlesex and Monmouth counties. Pallone was first elected to the Sixth District seat in November 1992.

Pallone's Central Jersey district is an ethnically diverse area with a wide range of business and industry. Light and heavy manufacturing facilities provide jobs for thousands of area residents. Central Jersey is on the cutting edge of high technology research and development. The district is home to Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey and Monmouth University. Tourism, primarily centered in the coastal areas, is vital to the regional economy. While the district has a predominantly suburban character, the cities of New Brunswick, Asbury Park and Perth Amboy are key urban centers.

Pallone married the former Sarah Hospodor in 1992. They have three children, daughters Rose and Celeste, and a son, Frank.

Albio Sires
New Jersey-8
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Albio Sires

Born in the Cuban town of Bejucal, he grew up in the waning years of pre-Communist Cuba. His family fled in January 1962 with the help of relatives in America. Congressman Sires became a star basketball player at Memorial High School and received a four-year basketball scholarship from St. Peter’s College. He went on to receive a Masters Degree from Middlebury College in Vermont.

Congressman Sires was a teacher and business owner before entering public service. He proudly served as Mayor of West New York, New Jersey from 1995 to 2006. During that time, the Congressman created more affordable housing units than any municipality in the State of New Jersey by fostering public-private partnerships and the use of targeted tax incentives. He balanced twelve consecutive municipal budgets while maintaining and enhancing vital municipal services. His efforts were recognized by many, including the New Jersey State Bar Association and Legal Services and his fellow Mayors who named him, “Mayor of the Year” in 2004.

Congressman Sires also served in the New Jersey State Assembly, where he served two terms as Speaker of the Assembly. As Speaker, Congressman Sires led the effort to create the Office of Lieutenant Governor and the Assembly Committee on Homeland Security and State Preparedness, as well as, raise the minimum wage, expand job training, and fund valuable cancer research. He also created the STARS I and STARS II program, which offers full county and state college tuition scholarships to thousands of students. He increased funding for public education by $760 million and helped fund after-school programs to get kids off the streets and away from gangs.

During his first term in the U.S. House of Representatives, Congressman Sires served on the Financial Services Committee. There he focused on housing, introducing legislation to aid public housing authorities and supporting housing for low-income seniors.

Today, Congressman Sires serves on three Committees: Foreign Affairs, Transportation and Infrastructure, and Budget. On the Foreign Affairs Committee, Congressman Sires is the Chairman of the Western Hemisphere, Civilian Security, and Trade Subcommittee and is a member of the Europe, Eurasia, Energy, and the Environment Subcommittee. He is focused on bolstering U.S. relations around the world and working with our allies to promote peace, security and prosperity. It is essential that we continue addressing the ongoing global challenges, including the protection of human rights, combatting violence and corruption, and strengthening democracy.

The Congressman serves on two Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittees: the Highways and Transit Subcommittee and the Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials Subcommittee. In this role he will continue advocating for infrastructure investment in vital efforts like the Gateway Project, and support increased transit and commuting options, safe and innovate transportation, as well as more efficient goods movement.

In an ongoing effort to keep our communities safe, Congressman Sires is a member of the Gun Violence Prevention Task Force, where he works with other members of Congress to promote legislation that develops a comprehensive set of policy principles to reduce gun violence while respecting 2nd Amendment rights. This term, the Congressman will continue to focus his efforts on the economy, jobs, immigration, gun violence, and government accountability. 

Congressman Sires resides in West New York with his wife, Adrienne. His stepdaughter, Tara Kole, graduated from Harvard Law School, clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, and now works for a private law firm in Los Angeles.

Dina Titus
Nevada-1
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Dina Titus

Serving the First Congressional District of Nevada, Congresswoman Dina Titus has built a strong record of achievement as both an educator and a public servant. As a professor, Dr. Titus taught American and Nevada government classes from 1979 through June 2011 at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas where she has professor emeritus status. A noted non-fiction writer, she is internationally known for her expertise in the history and policies related to nuclear power, weaponry, and waste as well as for her knowledge of the popular lore of "Atomic Culture."

In 1988, Dina was elected to represent the people of District Seven in the Nevada State Senate, serving as the Democratic Minority Leader from 1993 to 2008. During her service in the Legislature, Dina was a champion for quality education and renewable energy development, and a strong advocate on behalf of Nevada’s children, seniors, and persons with disabilities.

Dina has received numerous awards from various state and local organizations, but one of her proudest moments came in 2006 with the dedication of the Dina Titus Estates, an innovative affordable housing complex for disabled Nevadans, named in recognition of Dina's tireless advocacy.

Currently in her fifth term in the U.S. House of Representatives, Dina is the dean of Nevada’s Congressional delegation. She is a proud member of the House Committees on Transportation and Infrastructure, Foreign Affairs, and Homeland Security. In 2018, Dina was elected to become the Chair of a key Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee, where she works to help Nevada’s communities better respond to natural disasters, address the devastating impacts of climate change, and fight for infrastructure projects that will benefit the most vulnerable.

After helping the Las Vegas community recover from the deadliest shooting in modern American history, Dina has emerged as one of the leading voices in Congress for substantive action to reduce gun violence. She is a strong advocate for the DREAM Act and comprehensive immigration reform. An expert on matters of nuclear energy and waste, Dina leads the effort in Congress to oppose the revitalization of Yucca Mountain.

Dina grew up in the small town of Tifton, Georgia, with her parents, Joe and Betty Titus, and her younger sister, Dr. Rho Hudson, who is a professor of special education and founding faculty member of Nevada State College. Dina is a graduate of the College of William and Mary, holds a Master's degree from the University of Georgia, and earned her Doctorate at Florida State University.

Dina has been married to Professor Thomas C. Wright for over 35 years. Tom, a Latin American historian, received the prestigious UNLV Distinguished Professor award in 2008 and is the author of a number of award-winning books, most notably on political exile and human rights. John Wright Hall on campus is named after his father, pioneer professor at UNLV.

Mark Amodei
Nevada-2
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Mark Amodei

MARK E. AMODEI

Republican of Carson City, Nev.

Elected to the 112th Congress on September 13, 2011

BORN:

Carson City, June 12, 1958

EDUCATION:

Bachelors of Arts, University of Nevada, Reno, 1980

Juris Doctor, University of Pacific, McGeorge School of Law, 1983

EXPERIENCE:

President, Nevada Mining Association, 2007-2008

Lawyer, Kummer, et al., 2004-2007

Lawyer, Allison, MacKenzie, et al., 1987-2004

Lawyer, United States Army, Judge Advocate General Corps, 1983-1987

Nevada State Assembly, 1996-1998

Nevada State Senate, 1998-2010

President Pro Tempore, Nevada State Senate, 2003-2008

CHILDREN:

Daughters Ryanne and Erin

Susie Lee
Nevada-3
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Susie Lee

Representative Susie Lee was born to a working family of ten in Canton, Ohio. A product of the public education system, she attended Carnegie Mellon University--where she used a combination of scholarships, loans and part-time jobs to pay for her education.  

Rep. Susie Lee moved to Las Vegas in 1993, where she became an education non-profit leader. She worked to improve the education system, decrease school dropout rates, and provide after-school programming for Nevada students. Her career taught her how to take on tough problems, roll up her sleeves, and bring people together to find solutions for Nevada’s problems. 

In Congress, she is fighting to improve our education system, honor our promise to our veterans, and tackle rising health care costs. Rep. Lee believes in working across the aisle and bringing people together to solve problems, which is why she joined the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus. She now lives in Las Vegas with her husband, Dan, and their two children.

Steven Horsford
Nevada-4
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Steven Horsford

Representative Horsford is a proven champion for Nevada’s working families. He is committed to standing up to the reckless agenda of Donald Trump and congressional Republicans that is hurting Nevadans’ access to affordable health care and benefiting the wealthy at the expense of Nevada’s middle class.

Rep. Horsford understands the challenges many families in Nevada’s Fourth face each and everyday.  He will fight for responsible gun control and background checks. He lost his father when he was 19 and empathizes with those who have experienced the pain of losing a loved one to gun violence. He will work tirelessly to end the school to prison pipeline and provide the safety net children and families need to succeed. Serving together, Rep. Horsford and his wife Sonya, have worked to strengthen children, families and communities because they know - family matters. 

For more than a decade, Rep. Horsford led the Culinary Training Academy, the largest job training program in Nevada, helping thousands of workers find quality careers in the hospitality industry. An unique partnership between labor and business, the Culinary Training Academy under Rep. Horsford’s leadership placed over 80 percent of graduates into good paying jobs and completed a multi-million capital construction campaign.

Rep. Horsford made history as Nevada’s first African-American State Senate Majority Leader and he delivered. He passed the "Clean Energy Jobs Initiative" and positioned Nevada as a leader in renewable energy. When Nevada’s economy was devastated during the recession, Rep. Horsford worked across party lines to solve the worst budget crisis in state history.

While previously representing Nevadans in our nation's capital, Rep. Horsford worked to ensure veterans, seniors citizens, and all Nevadans received the benefits they deserved, authored and passed the Nevada Lands Bill to create jobs across the state, and fought to protect a woman’s right to make her own healthcare decisions.

Most recently a small business owner, in partnership with Intel, Horsford worked to bring the first of its kind workforce development program for youth and young adults to North Las Vegas. He helped to launch a food recovery program with Three Square and major employers like MGM Resorts to address food insecurity among needy children, families and seniors.  He brings a principled focus on job creation, community development and skills development to Congress. A devoted family man, Rep. Horsford has raised a strong family with his wife, Sonya Horsford, and their three children.

Lee Zeldin
New York-1
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Lee Zeldin

Congressman Lee Zeldin grew up in Suffolk County, New York, where he graduated from William Floyd High School in Mastic Beach. Congressman Zeldin graduated from the State University of New York at Albany (SUNY) and then Albany Law School, becoming New York's youngest attorney at the time at the age of 23.

After completing the Army ROTC program, Congressman Zeldin served for four years on Active Duty. During that time, he served in different capacities, including as a Military Intelligence Officer, Prosecutor and Military Magistrate. While assigned to the Army’s elite 82nd Airborne Division, in the summer of 2006, Congressman Zeldin was deployed to Tikrit, Iraq, with an infantry battalion of fellow paratroopers in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Following his service on active duty, in 2007, Congressman Zeldin transitioned from Active Duty to the Army Reserves, where he was recently promoted to Lieutenant Colonel.

In 2008, Congressman Zeldin opened a successful law practice in Smithtown, New York, which he operated full time until he was elected to the New York State Senate in 2010, representing New York's 3rd Senate District. As a State Senator, Congressman Zeldin led the successful effort to repeal the MTA Payroll Tax for 80 percent of employers, a job killing tax that was hurting New York's small businesses. He also created the PFC Joseph Dwyer Program, a peer to peer counseling program for veterans suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI); the program started in Suffolk County and quickly expanded across the state. Congressman Zeldin also successfully fought to repeal the Saltwater Fishing License Fee; a victory for tens of thousands of fishermen on Long Island.

In 2014, following four years in the State Senate, Congressman Zeldin was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, representing New York’s First Congressional District.

Immediately after taking office in 2015, Congressman Zeldin quickly became a leading voice in America on the need for a stronger, more consistent foreign policy; outspoken on the need to defeat ISIS and other terrorist threats, secure our homeland, and correct a deeply flawed Iran nuclear agreement.

Throughout his tenure, Congressman Zeldin has continued to secure important victories for his district. Working on both sides of the aisle, Congressman Zeldin has championed dozens of bill to combat the heroin and opioid abuse epidemic, ushered into law his Adult Day Health Care Act to aid veterans who are 70% of more disabled and safeguard veterans’ homeownership opportunities, secured House passage of four proposals to save Plum Island, secured a $65 million per year authorization for five years of the Long Island Sound Program and led the successful fight to permanently reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

Furthermore, Congressman Zeldin helped pass a five-year, fully funded transportation bill that included his Safe Bridges Act proposal, which was signed into law, and ushered into law his common core amendment. He also secured a new veterans health care clinic on the East End of Long Island and permanently reauthorized the Zadroga Act for our 9/11 first responders. Additionally, he recently steered the Department of Energy’s new $2 billion Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) project to Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), injecting billions of dollars and an extensive number of jobs into New York’s First Congressional District.

His office has successfully closed over 10,000 cases in favor of NY-1 constituents.

In 2018, Congressman Zeldin was re-elected and his top priorities remain protecting America’s security at home and abroad, helping grow our economy and create more good paying jobs, supporting our veterans and first responders, improving the quality of education, repairing our nation’s infrastructure, improving healthcare in America and safeguarding our environment.

Currently, Congressman Zeldin serves on two Committees in the House of Representatives: Financial Services and Foreign Affairs, where he serves as Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations. Additionally, Congressman Zeldin serves as co-chair of the Long Island Sound Caucus and founding member of the National Estuary Program Caucus and as one of two Jewish Republicans in Congress, also serves as co-chairman of the House Republican Israel Caucus, which has over 100 members, and has been a stalwart opponent of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, coleading a House passed resolution (H.Res.246) to combat it.

Congressman Zeldin resides in his hometown of Shirley with his wife, Diana, and their twin daughters, Mikayla and Arianna.

Adriano Espaillat
New York-13
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Adriano Espaillat

U.S. Representative Adriano Espaillat proudly represents New York’s Thirteenth Congressional District. He was sworn into office on January 3, 2017, during the 115th Congress.  

First elected to Congress in 2016, Rep. Adriano Espaillat is serving his second term in Congress where he serves as a member of the influential U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee, the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, and the House Small Business Committee.  He is a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHC) and serves in a leadership role as CHC Whip.  He is also chairman of the CHC Task Force for Transportation, Infrastructure and Housing.  Rep. Espaillat is a Senior Whip of the Democratic Caucus and Deputy Whip of the Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC). Rep. Espaillat’s congressional district includes Harlem, East Harlem, West Harlem, Hamilton Heights, Washington Heights, Inwood, Marble Hill, and the north-west Bronx. 

During the 115th Congress, Rep. Espaillat was among the top three Freshmen members to introduce and pass legislation, including his bill, H.R. 4406, which designated the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 99 Macombs Place in New York, New York as the Tuskegee Airmen Post Office Building.  In 2018, Quorum named Rep. Espaillat as one of the top 10 most active Members of Congress on Twitter

A steadfast champion for working- and middle-class New Yorkers, Congressman Espaillat is a staunch advocate of a fair living wage, immediate and effective investments in affordable housing, meaningful criminal justice reform, infrastructure improvements, expanded youth programs, and better educational opportunities.  

Throughout the tenure of his career in public service, Congressman Espaillat has been a vocal advocate for protecting tenants, improving schools, and making serious, smart investments in economic development, job creation, and environmental protection.  Prior to coming to Congress, he served as a New York State Senator during which he represented the neighborhoods of Marble Hill, Inwood, Washington Heights, Hamilton Heights, West Harlem, the Upper West Side, Hell's Kitchen, Clinton, and Chelsea.

While in the New York State Senate, Congressman Espaillat served as the Ranking Member of the Senate Housing, Construction, and Community Development Committee; Chairman of the Senate Puerto Rican/Latino Caucus; and as a member of the Environmental Conservation, Economic Development, Codes, Insurance, and Judiciary committees. Prior to his tenure as a state senator, he served in the New York State Assembly, and in 1996 became the first Dominican-American elected to a state legislature.  In 2002, Espaillat was elected chair of the New York State Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus.
 
Prior to entering elected office, Congressman Espaillat served as the Manhattan Court Services Coordinator for the NYC Criminal Justice Agency, a non-profit organization that provides indigent legal services and works to reduce unnecessary pretrial detention and post-sentence incarceration costs.  He later worked as Director of the Washington Heights Victims Services Community Office, an organization offering counseling and other services to families of victims of homicides and other crimes, and as the Director of Project Right Start, a national initiative funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to combat substance abuse by educating the parents of pre-school children.

Congressman Espaillat is a proud father and grandfather.

Sean Patrick Maloney
New York-18
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Sean Patrick Maloney

Representative Sean Patrick Maloney currently represents New York’s 18th district in the U.S. House of Representatives and was first elected in November 2012. His top priorities include national security, protecting our drinking water, ensuring our veterans get the benefits they earned, and combating the heroin and opioid epidemic.

Rep. Maloney currently serves on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, and the House Agriculture Committee. 

The House Intelligence Committee is responsible for overseeing the nation's intelligence agencies, including components of the Departments of Defense, Homeland Security, Justice, State, Treasury and Energy. 

On the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Rep. Maloney serves as the Chairman of the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Subcommittee, which is responsible for overseeing and supporting the Coast Guard, regulating shipping, ports and waterways, and protecting the environment. 

Rep. Maloney also serves on the House Agriculture Committee, where he fights to protect important and unique programs which benefit local farmers in the Hudson Valley. 

He has a distinguished background in business and public service. He served as a senior advisor in President Bill Clinton’s White House as part of a team that balanced the budget and paid down the debt, all while creating over eight hundred thousand jobs here in New York.

When Sean left the White House, he built his own business from scratch. His high-tech startup created hundreds of New York jobs.

Sean then served as a senior staff member to two Democratic governors of New York, focusing on education and infrastructure projects. He oversaw 13 state agencies and departments, including those responsible for all homeland security, state police and emergency management operations.

Sean and his husband, Randy Florke, have 3 children together and currently reside in Cold Spring, NY.

Antonio Delgado
New York-19
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Antonio Delgado

Rep. Delgado is from Schenectady and lives in Rhinebeck with his wife, Lacey, and their twin sons, Maxwell and Coltrane. Rep. Delgado's parents worked for General Electric in Schenectady, demonstrating the values of hard work and commitment to community. It is that hard-working spirit that Rep. Delgado has continued throughout his life: he earned a Rhodes Scholarship while he attended Colgate University in Hamilton, New York, and went on to attend Harvard Law School. Rep. Delgado's professional experiences include a career in the music industry focused on empowering young people through Hip Hop culture, as well as working as an attorney in the complex commercial space, where he also dedicated significant time to pro bono work in connection with criminal justice reform. It's because of these diverse professional and personal experiences that Rep. Delgado can find common ground across the aisle and deliver results for the people of New York's 19th Congressional District.

Rep. Delgado spends every day in Congress focused on creating a vibrant local economy, working with local, state, and federal partners -- regardless of party -- to get results for the people here. From improving access to quality, affordable health care to expanding rural broadband to protecting our agricultural interests, Rep. Delgado is dedicated to working across the aisle and standing up for what residents need.

Rep. Delgado takes seriously his responsibility to be a voice for his constituents across the district, and hold himself accountable to them –Rep. Delgado held 33 town halls in 2019, three in each of the 11 counties in the 19th Congressional District. Rep. Delgado is also committed to ensuring transparency and accessibility: He is posting his public events on this website so constituents across the district can speak with him personally, and setting up offices and mobile offices across the district so that everyone can have their questions answered, issues addressed, and voices heard.

Paul Tonko
New York-20
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Paul Tonko

Congressman Paul Tonko represents New York’s 20th Congressional District, including the communities of Albany, Schenectady, Troy, Saratoga Springs and Amsterdam. He represents all of Albany and Schenectady Counties and parts of Montgomery, Rensselaer and Saratoga Counties.

He is serving his sixth term, after first being sworn into Congress in 2009.

Paul serves on the Energy and Commerce Committee, the oldest standing committee in the House, created in December of 1795. He is the first Upstate New York Democratic member to serve on the committee since Leo O'Brien, who resigned the post in October 1966. He was elected by his peers in the 116th Congress to chair the Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change. He was also selected to continue his service on the Science, Space and Technology Committee, as well as on the Natural Resources Committee.

He has previously served on the Education and Labor Committee and the Budget Committee.

Elise Stefanik
New York-21
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Elise Stefanik

Congresswoman Elise Stefanik proudly represents New York's 21st District in the House of Representatives in her third term in office. She is a Member of the Armed Services Committee, the Committee on Education and Labor, and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. On the Armed Services Committee, Congresswoman Stefanik serves as Ranking Member for the Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities and is a Member of the Subcommittee on Readiness. On the Committee on Education and Labor, she serves on the Subcommittees on Higher Education & Workforce Development and Civil Rights & Human Services. 

Congresswoman Stefanik is proudly the youngest Republican woman ever elected to Congress in United States history.

Congresswoman Elise M. Stefanik was born and raised in Upstate New York. Prior to serving in Congress, Elise worked at her family’s Upstate New York small business. Growing up in her family’s small business, she learned, lived and understands the values of hard work, perseverance, challenges and risks that go along with building, operating and growing small businesses in the North Country. 

Congresswoman Stefanik served as Director of Vice Presidential Debate Prep to Paul Ryan where she oversaw all debate preparations for the Republican Vice Presidential nominee. She served as Director of Communications for the Foreign Policy Initiative, which launched Defending Defense, a coalition of think tanks warning of the dangers of the sequester.

From 2006 - 2009, Congresswoman Stefanik served in the West Wing of the White House as part of President George W. Bush's Domestic Policy Council Staff and in the Chief of Staff's office where she assisted in overseeing the policy development process on all economic and domestic policy issues.

As the first member of her immediate family to graduate from college, Congresswoman Stefanik graduated with Honors from Harvard University. She currently serves on the Senior Advisory Committee of Harvard's Institute of Politics, the largest political undergraduate organization.

She graduated cum laude from Albany Academy for Girls, the oldest continuous all girls' school in the country. She lives in Schuylerville, NY, with her husband Matt.

Tom Reed
New York-23
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Tom Reed

Tom Reed, the youngest of 12, was raised by a single mother on a social security check. His father, a decorated career military officer, died when he was 2 but Tom still learned from his legacy of service and loyalty.  

These ideals inspired Tom’s mission to help people in need. 

Before going to Congress, Tom was the mayor of Corning, the town where he was raised and still lives today with his wife Jean and their two children Autumn and Will, under the roof of the home his grandfather built.

As the mayor of his hometown, Tom learned potholes and parking tickets are not partisan issues and that is the approach he brings to Washington.

He co-chairs the Problem Solvers Caucus – a group of 24 Republicans and 24 Democrats who meet weekly to solve some of the most contentious issues facing our country today.

Tom remains committed to being accessible and help anyone in need. He and his team have completed more than 13,000 constituent cases, resolving issues with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Veterans Administration (VA), Social Security Administration (SSA) and other federal agencies. He has also held more than 250 public town hall meetings to listen to the thoughts and concerns of his constituents, earning him recognition as one of the most accessible members of Congress.

A former All-American swimmer, Tom graduated from Alfred University in 1993 and from Ohio Northern University College of Law in 1996.

He currently serves on the influential House Ways and Means committee as the Republican Leader of the Social Security Subcommittee.

Joe Morelle
New York-25
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Joe Morelle

Congressman Joe Morelle is proud to represent New York’s 25th Congressional District, which includes almost the entirety of Monroe County.  A lifelong resident of Upstate New York, Rep. Morelle is a former small business owner and was previously elected to the Monroe County Legislature as well as the New York State Assembly, where he served as Majority Leader from 2013-2018. Throughout his career, Rep. Morelle has worked diligently to improve and expand access to healthcare for all people, grow our economy, and protect our communities by passing legislation to ban assault weapons and strengthen gun background checks.

A graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo, Rep. Morelle resides in the town of Irondequoit in Rochester, New York, with his wife, Mary Beth. They have three children and four grandchildren.

Grace Meng
New York-6
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Grace Meng

U.S. Congresswoman Grace Meng is serving her fourth term in the United States House of Representatives. Grace represents the Sixth Congressional District of New York encompassing the New York City borough of Queens, including west, central and northeast Queens.
 
Grace is the first and only Asian American Member of Congress from New York State and the first female Congressmember from Queens since former Vice Presidential nominee Geraldine Ferraro.
 
Grace is a member of the powerful House Appropriations Committee and its Subcommittees on State and Foreign Operations, Homeland Security, and Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies. The Appropriations Committee is responsible for funding every federal agency, program, and project within the United States government. She also serves on the House Ethics Committee. 
 
Grace is also a Senior Whip and Regional Whip for New York, and a founder and Co-Chair of the Kids’ Safety Caucus, the first bipartisan coalition in the House that promotes child-safety issues. She helped create and serves as a founding member and former Co-Chair of the Quiet Skies Caucus which works to mitigate excessive aircraft noise that adversely affects communities.
 
Grace has passed several pieces of legislation in law. These include laws about religious freedom, making Queens historic sites part of the National Park Service, striking “Oriental” from federal law and protecting public housing residents from insufficient heat. Also signed into law were her measures to assist veterans and members of the military, and provisions to improve consumer protections and safeguards for children.
 
In addition, Grace has fought to expand opportunities for communities of color, young people and women, and she secured resources to help local small-businesses.
 
Born in Elmhurst, Queens, and raised in the Bayside and Flushing sections of the borough, Grace attended local schools, and graduated from Stuyvesant High School and the University of Michigan. She then earned a law degree from Yeshiva University’s Benjamin Cardozo School of Law.
 
Prior to serving in Congress, Grace was a member of the New York State Assembly. Before entering public service, she worked as a public-interest lawyer.
 
Grace resides in Queens with her husband, Wayne, and two sons, Tyler and Brandon.

Nydia Velazquez
New York-7
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Nydia Velazquez

Congresswoman Nydia M. Velázquez is currently serving her fourteenth term as Representative for New York’s 7th Congressional District. In the 116th Congress, she is the Chairwoman of the House Small Business Committee, a senior member of the Financial Services Committee and a member of the House Committee on Natural Resources. 

She has made history several times during her tenure in Congress. In 1992, she was the first Puerto Rican woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. In February 1998, she was named Ranking Democratic Member of the House Small Business Committee, making her the first Hispanic woman to serve as Ranking Member of a full House committee. Most recently, in 2006, she was named Chairwoman of the House Small Business Committee, making her the first Latina to chair a full Congressional committee.

Given these achievements, her roots are humble. She was born in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico - a small town of sugar-cane fields - in 1953, and was one of nine children. Velázquez started school early, skipped several grades, and became the first person in her family to receive a college diploma. At the age of 16, she entered the University of Puerto Rico in Rio Piedras. She graduated magna cum laude in 1974 with a degree in political science. After earning a master’s degree on scholarship from N.Y.U., Velázquez taught Puerto Rican studies at CUNY’s Hunter College in 1981.

But her passion for politics soon took hold. In 1983, Velázquez was appointed Special Assistant to Congressman Edolphus Towns (D-Brooklyn). One year later, she became the first Latina appointed to serve on the New York City Council.

By 1986, Velázquez served as the Director of the Department of Puerto Rican Community Affairs in the United States. During that time, she initiated one of the most successful Latino empowerment programs in the nation’s history - "Atrevete" (Dare to Go for It!).

In 1992, after months of running a grassroots political campaign, Velázquez was elected to the House of Representatives to represent New York's 7th District. Her district, which encompasses parts of Brooklyn, Queens and the Lower East Side of Manhattan, is the only tri-borough district in the New York City congressional delegation. Encompassing many diverse neighborhoods, it is home to a large Latino population, Jewish communities, and parts of Chinatown.

As a fighter for equal rights of the underrepresented and a proponent of economic opportunity for the working class and poor, Congresswoman Velázquez combines sensibility and compassion, as she works to encourage economic development, protect community health and the environment, combat crime and worker abuses, and secure access to affordable housing, quality education and health care for all New York City families.

As the top Democrat on the House Small Business Committee, which oversees federal programs and contracts totaling $200 billion annually, Congresswoman Velázquez has been a vocal advocate of American small business and entrepreneurship. She has established numerous small business legislative priorities, encompassing the areas of tax, regulations, access to capital, federal contracting opportunities, trade, technology, health care and pension reform, among others. Congresswoman Velázquez was named as the inaugural "Woman of the Year" by Hispanic Business Magazine in recognition of her national influence in both the political and business sectors and for her longtime support of minority enterprise.

Although her work on the Small Business Committee and the House Financial Services Committee (where she is the most senior New York Member on the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Opportunity) keeps her busy, Congresswoman Velázquez can often be found close to home, working for the residents of her district.

Hakeem Jeffries
New York-8
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Hakeem Jeffries

Hakeem Jeffries represents the diverse Eighth Congressional District of New York, an area that encompasses large parts of Brooklyn and a section of Queens. Serving his fourth term in the United States Congress, Rep. Jeffries is a member of the House Judiciary Committee and House Budget Committee.

Rep. Jeffries is Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, having been elected to that position by his colleagues in November 2018. In that capacity, he is the fifth highest-ranking Democrat in the House of Representatives.  He is also the former Whip of the Congressional Black Caucus and previously co-chaired the Democratic Policy and Communications Committee where he helped develop the For The People agenda.

In Congress, Rep. Jeffries is a tireless advocate for social and economic justice. He has worked hard to help residents impacted by the devastation of the COVID-19 pandemic, reform our criminal justice system, improve the economy for everyday Americans and protect our health care from right-wing attacks.

In January 2020, Rep. Jeffries was selected by Speaker Nancy Pelosi to serve as one of seven House Impeachment Managers in the Senate trial of President Donald Trump, becoming the first African American man to serve in that role.  During the nearly three-week trial, Congressman Jeffries argued that President Trump should be removed from office for abusing his power by pressuring a foreign government, Ukraine, to target an American citizen as part of a corrupt scheme to interfere in the 2020 election.  The House Impeachment Managers established with a mountain of evidence that crimes against the Constitution were committed. Nevertheless, the Senate failed to remove the President without hearing from a single witness during the trial.

On June 25, 2020, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 7120, the “George Floyd Justice in Policing Act.” Rep. Jeffries helped lead the charge with respect to passage of this historic police reform bill, which included legislation authored by the Congressman to criminalize the chokehold and other inherently dangerous tactics such as a knee to the neck.  Rep. Jeffries remains dedicated to working with his colleagues to make transformational police reform a reality and breathe life into the principle of liberty and justice for all.

Rep. Jeffries also played a major role in shaping Congress’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  For example, he worked across the aisle with Rep. Peter King (R-NY) to secure billions of dollars in funding for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority in the CARES Act (H.R. 748, Public Law No: 116-136), which became law in March 2020.  Rep. Jeffries also led the effort to incorporate a repeal of the cap on the State and Local Tax Deduction in the Heroes Act.   At home, Rep. Jeffries partnered with Governor Andrew Cuomo to expand testing in hard-hit communities of color by establishing walk-in sites at houses of worship throughout New York City.  He denounced discriminatory social distance policing that targeted communities of color and helped bring about a change in policy.  Rep. Jeffries also personally distributed food, personal protective equipment and hand sanitizer to residents in need.

In the 115th Congress, Rep. Jeffries worked across the aisle as the lead Democratic sponsor of the FIRST STEP Act (S. 756, Public Law No. 115-391), a strong, bipartisan criminal justice reform bill that the President signed into law in December 2018.  Rep. Jeffries partnered with Congressman Doug Collins, a conservative Republican from rural Georgia, on the legislation, which is widely viewed as the most meaningful criminal justice reform effort in a generation.

The FIRST STEP Act provides retroactive relief for the shameful crack cocaine sentencing disparity that unfairly destroyed lives, families and communities. The law shortens sentences by ensuring inmates can earn the 54 days of good time credit per year Congress intended and applies the change retroactively, to the benefit of thousands of currently incarcerated mothers, fathers, daughters and sons. It provides $375 million over five years to expand re-entry programming, including education and vocational training, which is proven to dramatically reduce recidivism and help prepare for a successful transition back into society. In order to strengthen and preserve family relationships, the bill requires the Bureau of Prisons to house incarcerated individuals within 500 driving miles of their relatives and permits the transfer of lower-risk inmates to home confinement. In addition, the FIRST STEP Act bans the immoral practice of shackling women throughout the duration of their pregnancy, during childbirth and for three months post-partum.

Rep. Jeffries also played a key role in the House passage of the historic Music Modernization Act (MMA) (H.R. 5447, Public Law No. 115-264), which became law in 2018. Heralded as a sweeping update to our copyright laws, the MMA will improve the licensing process so that songwriters, artists and musicians can continue to share their creativity with the world. Because of the MMA, songwriters are more likely to get paid a fair price for their work, and digital music providers like Spotify and Pandora will be able to operate more efficiently. In an era of crisis and dysfunction in Washington, the power of music brought Democrats and Republicans in Congress together to collaborate on groundbreaking legislation, ushering our music copyright system into the 21st Century.

In April of 2018, the President signed the Rep. Jeffries-authored Keep America’s Refuges Operational Act (H.R. 3979, Public Law No. 115-1689) into law. Each year, 47 million Americans visit wildlife refuges, generating almost $2 billion in local economic activity. This law will keep America’s refuges operational by supporting the volunteers who dedicate thousands of hours to maintain our public lands. Passage of this bill was part of a bipartisan, bicameral effort to ensure Americans can visit, explore and study wildlife and experience our nation’s vast natural beauty for generations to come.

Several other pieces of Rep. Jeffries-authored legislation passed the House of Representatives in the 115th Congress, including bills to investigate the public health impact of synthetic drug use by teenagers (H.R. 449, Public Law No. 115-271) and updating federal regulations to remove racially offensive terminology from use (H.R. 995). Rep. Jeffries’ H.R. 3229 (Public Law No. 95-521), which helps protect judicial officers from threats, harm and harassment by those who would seek to compromise the integrity of our judicial branch, also passed the House in 2017, and was signed into law in March 2018. Additionally, Rep. Jeffries authored H.R. 3370 (Public Law No. 95-921), the Fry Scholarship Enhancement Act, which became law as part of the Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2017. It will expand the availability of education benefits to the children and spouses of service members killed in the line of duty.

In the 114th Congress, Rep. Jeffries teamed up with Congressman Peter King to pass the Slain Officer Family Support Act of 2015 (H.R. 1508, Public Law No. 113-227), which President Obama signed into law. That law extended the tax deadline so that individuals making charitable donations to organizations supporting the families of assassinated New York Police Department (NYPD) Detectives Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos, could apply such tax deductions to the prior year’s tax return.

In the 113th Congress, Rep. Jeffries successfully passed H.R. 5108 (Public Law No. 113-227), legislation that established the Law School Clinic Certification Program of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) into law. This program had been operating in a pilot capacity since 2008 and enabled students at participating law schools to gain experience in patent and trademark law while providing legal assistance to inventors, tech entrepreneurs and small businesses. The bipartisan bill, which was signed by President Obama, expanded the program by removing its “pilot” status, making it available to all accredited law schools in the country that meet the program’s eligibility requirements.

Rep. Jeffries has been actively involved in the passage of a number of other key pieces of legislation, including the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 (H.R. 152), a bill that provides billions of dollars in Superstorm Sandy recovery to the Eighth District and other affected areas. The Congressman also sponsored — and passed as part of the National Defense Authorization package — the Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument Preservation Act, which directs the U.S. Secretary of the Interior to study the feasibility of designating the Prison Ship Martyrs’ mausoleum in Brooklyn as a national monument. Consisting of a 100-foot-wide granite staircase and a central Doric column 149 feet in height, the monument in Fort Greene Park houses the remains of 11,500 Revolutionary War soldiers who were kept as prisoners of war by the British.

While he remains committed to working diligently in Washington on behalf of New York’s Eighth Congressional District, Rep. Jeffries also works tirelessly to keep in close contact with constituents. In January, the Congressman begins each year with a well-attended State of the District Address. During the spring and summer, he holds “Congress on Your Corner” outdoor office hours throughout the district. At each stop, the Congressman sets up a table in front of a local post office or on neighborhood corners where constituents are able to meet with him one-on-one. He also hosts regularly-scheduled telephone town hall meetings that provide an opportunity for constituents to speak directly with the Congressman about local and national issues.

Prior to his election to the Congress, Rep. Jeffries served for six years in the New York State Assembly. In that capacity, he authored laws to protect the civil liberties of law-abiding New Yorkers during police encounters, encourage the transformation of vacant luxury condominiums into affordable homes for working families and improve the quality of justice in the civil court system.

In 2010, Rep. Jeffries successfully led the first meaningful legislative reform of the NYPD’s aggressive and controversial stop-and-frisk program. His legislation prohibits the NYPD from maintaining an electronic database with the personal information of individuals who were stopped, questioned and frisked during a police encounter but not charged with a crime or violation.

In the same year, Rep. Jeffries sponsored and championed groundbreaking civil rights legislation to end prison-based gerrymandering in New York State. This archaic practice of counting incarcerated individuals at the location of their imprisonment, rather than their homes, undermined the fundamental democratic principle of one person, one vote. After passage of Jeffries’ legislation, New York became the second state to count incarcerated individuals in their home districts in census calculations.

Congressman Jeffries obtained his bachelor’s degree in political science from the State University of New York at Binghamton, where he graduated with honors for outstanding academic achievement. He then received his master’s degree in public policy from Georgetown University. Thereafter, Rep. Jeffries attended New York University School of Law, where he graduated magna cum laude and served on Law Review.

After completing law school, Rep. Jeffries clerked for the Honorable Harold Baer Jr. of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. He then practiced law for several years at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP, an internationally renowned law firm and served as counsel in the litigation department of Viacom Inc. and CBS. He also worked as of-counsel at Godosky & Gentile, a well-regarded litigation firm in New York City.

Rep. Jeffries was born in Brooklyn Hospital, raised in Crown Heights and is a product of New York City’s public school system. He lives in Prospect Heights with his family.

Yvette Clarke
New York-9
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Yvette Clarke

Hailing from central Brooklyn, Congresswoman Yvette Diane Clarke feels honored to represent the community that raised her. She is the proud daughter of Jamaican immigrants and takes her passion for her Caribbean heritage to Congress, where she co-chairs the Congressional Caribbean Caucus and works to foster relationships between the United States and the Caribbean Community. Clarke is Vice Chair of the powerful Energy and Commerce Committee and a member of the Homeland Security Committee. Clarke has been a member of the Congressional Black Caucus since coming to Congress in 2007 and today chairs its Immgration Task Force while acting as an active member of its Census 2020 Task Force.

As the Representative of the Ninth Congressional District of New York, Congresswoman Clarke has dedicated herself to continuing the legacy of excellence established by the late Honorable Shirley Chisholm, the first Black woman and Caribbean American elected to Congress. In the 116th Congress, Congresswoman Clarke introduced landmark legislation, which passed in the House, the Dream and Promise Act (H.R. 6). This legislation would give 2.5 million DREAMers, temporary protected status and deferred enforcement departure recipients a clear pathway to citizenship.

Clarke is a leader in the tech and media policy space as co-chair of the Smart Cities Caucus and co-chair of the Multicultural Media Caucus. Congresswoman Clarke believes smart technology will make communities more sustainable, resilient and livable and works hard to ensure communities of color are not left behind while these technological advancements are made. Clarke formed the Multicultural Media Caucus to address issues related to the state of diversity and inclusion in the media, telecom and tech industries. Clarke is one of the Co-Chairs of the Congressional Caucus on Black Women and Girls, which develops programs to support the aspirations of Black women of all ages, Congresswoman Clarke is also the co-chair of the Medicare for All Caucus where she is fighting for the right to universal health care.

Prior to being elected to the United States House of Representatives, Congresswoman Clarke served on New York’s City Council, representing the 40th District. She succeeded her pioneering mother, former City Council Member Dr. Una S. T. Clarke, making them the first mother-daughter succession in the history of the City Council. She cosponsored City Council resolutions that opposed the war in Iraq, criticized the federal USA PATRIOT Act and called for a national moratorium on the death penalty.

Congresswoman Clarke is a graduate of Oberlin College and was a recipient of the prestigious APPAM/Sloan Fellowship in Public Policy and Policy Analysis. She received the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws Honoris Causa from the University of Technology, Jamaica and the Honorary Doctorate of Public Policy from the University of the Commonwealth Caribbean. Congresswoman Clarke currently resides in the neighborhood where she grew up, in the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn.

Mike Turner
Ohio-10
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Mike Turner

Congressman Mike Turner is a lifelong resident of Southwest Ohio.

His father worked in the manufacturing industry in Dayton for over 40 years, and his mother taught elementary school in the Huber Heights School District. His parents are residents of Greene County. Congressman Turner is the proud father of two daughters, Carolyn and Jessica Turner.

Growing up, Congressman Turner attended Dayton Public Schools and graduated from Belmont High School. He continued his education in Ohio and received a bachelor’s degree from Ohio Northern University; an MBA from the University of Dayton; and a Juris Doctorate from Case Western University School of Law.

Congressman Turner practiced law in Dayton for over 17 years and in 1991, he opened his own private legal practice specializing in real estate and corporate law.

Turner served as Mayor of the City of Dayton for eight years. During his tenure, he was a strong proponent of neighborhood revitalization, crime reduction, increased funding for safety forces, economic development and job creation. He created Rehabarama, a private-public partnership to rehabilitate neglected housing in Dayton’s historic neighborhoods, which had significant economic impact on the region and received national awards. 

For the 5 years prior to Mayor Turner’s leadership, Dayton did not have a balanced budget. Turner worked across the aisle and balanced the budget for all eight years of his tenure. He also successfully reduced police response time by 40%, added 54 police officers to the force, and established a development fund that awarded over $19 million in grants for housing and job producing projects.

Congressman Turner was first elected to Congress in 2002. In Congress, Turner serves as a subcommittee Chairman on the House Armed Services Committee and a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

In the 109th Congress, Congressman Turner served as Chairman of the Oversight and Government Reform's Subcommittee on Federalism and the Census. During his tenure, he helped save the Community Development Block Grant Program.

Prior to Congressman Turner's election, there was no advocate for Wright-Patterson Air Force Base on the important House Armed Services Committee. Congressman Turner filled that void and throughout his time in Congress, Wright-Patt has successfully added approximately 10,000 jobs and remains the largest single-site employer in the state of Ohio.

Congressman Turner currently serves as the Ranking Member of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces, where he has jurisdiction over the nation's nuclear arsenal, the Department of Defense's intelligence programs, and also over missile defense systems. 

Turner formerly served as the Chairman of the House Armed Services Tactical Air and Land Forces Subcommittee which oversees ammunition programs, Army and Air Force acquisition programs, all Navy and Marine Corps aviation programs, National Guard and Army and Air Force National Guard and Reserve. 

In January of 2011, Turner was appointed Chairman of the US Delegation to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly the inter-parliamentary organization of legislators from the countries of the North Atlantic Alliance. In December of 2014, Turner was elected President of the NATO Parliamentary Assembly. He now serves as Chairman of the Defense and Security Committee of the NATO Parliamentary Assembly.

In January 2015, the Speaker of the House appointed Congressman Turner to the House Intelligence Committee. He is one of only two members of Congress to serve on both the House Intelligence Committee and as a Subcommittee Chairman on the House Armed Services Committee. 

Marcia Fudge
Ohio-11
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Marcia Fudge

Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge is a committed public servant who brings a hard-working, problem-solving spirit to Congress and to the task of creating jobs, protecting safety net programs, and improving access to quality public education, health care and healthy foods.  First elected in 2008, she represents the people of the 11th Congressional District of Ohio.

Congresswoman Fudge serves on the Committee on House Administration, House Committee on Agriculture and House Committee on Education and Labor.  She is the Chair of the Committee on House Administration Subcommittee on Elections and Chair of the Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on Nutrition, Oversight and Department Operations.  She serves on the Subcommittees on Conservation and Forestry (Agriculture), Civil Rights and Human Services (Education & Labor) and Health, Employment, Labor and Pensions (Education & Labor).

In the 115th Congress, the Congresswoman served on the House Committee on Education and the Workforce Subcommittees on Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education and on Health, Employment, Labor and Pensions.  She also served as Ranking Member on the House Committee on Agriculture Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry and a member on the Subcommittee on Nutrition.  She is a member of several Congressional Caucuses and past Chair of the Congressional Black Caucus.

Congresswoman Fudge consistently fights for voter protection, equitable access to a quality education from preschool through post-secondary programs, child nutrition, food stamp (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) recipients, access to locally grown, healthy foods, fair labor practices, and civil and human rights, among other issues.  Additionally, she remains a steadfast advocate to strengthen and preserve Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid.

Congresswoman Fudge has served the people of Ohio for more than three decades, beginning with the Cuyahoga County Prosecutor’s Office.  She was later elected as the first African American and first female mayor of Warrensville Heights, Ohio, where she led the city in shoring up a sagging retail base and providing new residential construction.

Congresswoman Fudge earned her bachelor’s degree in business from The Ohio State University and law degree from the Cleveland State University Cleveland-Marshall School of Law.  She is a Past National President of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., and a member of its Greater Cleveland Alumnae Chapter.

Congresswoman Fudge’s work ethic, problem-solving approach, and ability to build collaborative relationships have earned her a reputation among her colleagues in Washington and at home as an insightful leader and knowledgeable legislator.  As a dedicated public servant, she begins each morning with a firm promise “to do the people’s work.”  It is this simple philosophy that defines Congresswoman Fudge as a Member of substance and character who always keeps her promise.

Troy Balderson
Ohio-12
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Troy Balderson

Congressman Troy Balderson was sworn in as a Member of the United States House of Representatives on September 5, 2018 and represents Ohio’s 12th Congressional District. Troy currently serves on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee; House Science, Space, and Technology Committee; as well as the House Small Business Committee and its Innovation and Workforce Subcommittee, for which he serves as Ranking Member.

A lifelong Ohioan, Troy was born and raised in Muskingum County and graduated from Zanesville High School. He attended Muskingum College and The Ohio State University, and worked on the family farm and for his family-owned automotive dealership before pursuing a career in public service.

Troy was first elected to the Ohio House of Representatives in 2008 and was appointed to the Ohio Senate in 2011. Troy was reelected to the Ohio Senate twice and served as chairman of the powerful Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and as a member of the Senate Finance Committee. During his time in the Ohio Senate, Troy voted to cut taxes by $5 billion, eliminate Ohio’s deficit, and replenish the state’s rainy-day fund.

As a principled conservative, Troy supports protecting life, Second Amendment rights, and ensuring Ohio’s job creators have the tools and resources they need to grow their businesses. As the operator of a family-owned farm, Troy has seen firsthand the damage that government overregulation and burdensome red tape can have on small businesses. He believes government plays a key role in creating the environment for economic growth and prosperity.

An avid runner and cyclist, Troy has completed multi-day adventure races that also involve whitewater rafting and climbing, and finished a 600-mile bike ride through the Rocky Mountains.

Troy currently resides in Zanesville and has one son, Joshua. He has served as an elder at the First Christian Church in Zanesville.

Tim Ryan
Ohio-13
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Tim Ryan

Tim Ryan is a relentless advocate for working families in Ohio's 13th District. He was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2002 and was sworn in on January 3, 2003. Successfully reelected eight times, he is now serving in his ninth term. Congressman Ryan currently serves as a member of the powerful House Appropriations Committee which controls the expenditure of money by the federal government.
 

Ryan serves as co-chairman of the Congressional Manufacturing Caucus and remains a leader in the fight to strengthen America's manufacturing base and reform U.S. trade policies. The House Manufacturing Caucus examines and promotes policies to help American manufacturers find trained, educated workers, continue to lead the world in developing new industrial technologies, operate on a level playing field with their foreign competitors, and obtain the capital they need to thrive. Ryan is the leading advocate in the House to impose sanctions on unfair Chinese currency manipulation.

Ryan's primary focus remains on the economy and quality-of-life in Northeast Ohio. He works closely with local officials and community leaders to advance local projects that enhance the economic competitiveness and help attract high-quality, high-paying jobs.

He is a dynamic leader in the House and speaks out on issues of particular concern in Northeast Ohio. He is a champion of efforts to make college more affordable, revitalize America's cities and improve the health and well-being of American families and children. His work on these and other issues has garnered the attention of the national media.  He is the author of Healing America: How a Simple Practice Can Help Us Recapture the American Spirit and The Real Food Revolution: Healthy Eating, Green Groceries, and the Return of the American Family Farm. 

Ryan has also served in the Ohio State Senate where he spearheaded efforts to establish a state-based earned income tax credit, to standardize community school data reporting, and bring college students into the debate over higher education funding.

Before his election to public office, Ryan served as President of the Trumbull County Young Democrats and as Chairman of the Earning by Learning program in Warren, Ohio. He began his career in politics as a congressional aide with the U.S. House of Representatives in 1995 and later served as an intern for the Trumbull County Prosecutor's Office. Ryan holds a law degree from the University of New Hampshire School of Law (formerly the Franklin Pierce Law Center), studied abroad as part of the Dickinson School of Law's International Law Program in Florence, Italy, and graduated with a Bachelor's Degree in Political Science from Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio.

Ryan was born on July 16, 1973 in Niles, Ohio and currently resides in Howland, Ohio with his wife Andrea and three children.

Steve Stivers
Ohio-15
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Steve Stivers

Steve Stivers is currently serving his fifth term as a Member of Congress and represents Ohio’s 15th Congressional District, which is made up of 12 counties including, all of Clinton, Fairfield, Hocking, Madison, Morgan, Perry, Pickaway, and Vinton counties, and parts of Athens, Fayette, Franklin, and Ross counties.

Stivers has served on the Financial Services Committee throughout his time in Congress, which oversees the banking, insurance, real estate, public and assisted housing, and securities industries. The Committee also reviews housing and consumer protection legislation and has jurisdiction over Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Federal Reserve Bank.

Throughout his career, Steve Stivers has worked to encourage job creation, promote economic development, and put our country’s fiscal house in order. He is the lead sponsor of a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution, which would restrict the federal government from spending more than it brings in.

Stivers has also been a strong advocate for veterans and their families. In his first term, he passed the HIRE at Home Act and TRICARE for Kids to help returning soldiers reenter the job market and provide their children better health care, respectfully. In his second term, he passed legislation to re-name two postal facilities located in Ohio’s 15th Congressional District after area veterans who had given their lives in service to our country.

During 114th Congress, in his continued work to combat Ohio’s opiate epidemic, Stivers was the lead cosponsor of H.R. 1462, The Protecting Our Infants Act, a new law which ensures a coordinated federal response to Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS), a devastating condition that impacts babies born to drug addicted mothers. Additionally, Stivers was the lead cosponsor of the Reducing Unused Medications Act, H.R. 4599, which seeks to reduce the availability opioids for abuse by allowing for a partial fill of such prescriptions,  if requested by a doctor or patient. This bill was signed into law in 2016.

Prior to running for Congress, Stivers served in the Ohio Senate. He also worked in the private sector for the Ohio Company and Bank One, where he focused on promoting economic development and encouraging job creation.

A career soldier, Stivers has served over 30 years in the Ohio Army National Guard and holds the rank of Brigadier General. He served the United States overseas during Operation Iraqi Freedom in Kuwait, Iraq, Qatar and Djibouti where he led 400 soldiers and contractors and is proud that each and every one returned home safely to the United States. Stivers received the Bronze Star for his leadership throughout the deployment.

Stivers received both his bachelor’s degree and his MBA from The Ohio State University and resides in Columbus with his wife, Karen, and children, Sarah and Sam.

Anthony Gonzalez
Ohio-16
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Anthony Gonzalez

U.S. Congressman Anthony Gonzalez is proud to represent Ohio’s 16th District in the U.S. House of Representatives. As the son and grandson of Cuban immigrants who fled the Castro regime, Congressman Gonzalez cherishes the opportunity to serve his country and his community as a member of the world’s greatest legislative body. Congressman Gonzalez serves on the House Science, Space and Technology Committee and on the Financial Services Committee, where he is the vice chair of the Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion. He is also a proud co-chair of the House China Task Force.

Congressman Gonzalez was born and raised in Northeast Ohio. He is a graduate of The Ohio State University where he played wide receiver under Coach Jim Tressel, before becoming a first-round draft pick for the Indianapolis Colts. After five seasons in the NFL, Congressman Gonzalez attended Stanford Business School and launched a career in the technology industry before returning home to Northeast Ohio.

Congressman Gonzalez and his wife, Elizabeth, reside in Rocky River with their two young children, Alexander and Caroline.

Bill Johnson
Ohio-6
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Bill Johnson

Bill Johnson was born and raised on family farms, where he learned early the values of hard work, honesty, and sacrifice. Those values have stayed with Johnson throughout his life and have made him the leader he is today.

Johnson entered the U.S. Air Force in 1973, and retired as a Lieutenant Colonel after a distinguished military career of more than 26 years. He graduated Summa Cum Laude from Troy University in Troy, Alabama in 1979, and he earned his Master’s Degree from Georgia Tech in 1984. During his tenure in the U.S. Air Force, Johnson was recognized as a Distinguished Graduate from the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps, Squadron Officers School, and Air Command & Staff College. Bill is also a proud recipient of the Air Force Meritorious Service Medal, the Air Force Commendation Medal, and the National Defense Service Medal. As Director of the Air Force’s Chief Information Officer Staff at U.S. Special Operations Command, Johnson worked directly with senior congressional and Secretary of Defense representatives, as well as top leaders within the various U.S. intelligence communities, to ensure America’s Special Operations forces were adequately equipped to carry out critical national security missions.

Following his retirement from military service, Johnson turned to creating and building high technology businesses. He cofounded Johnson-Schley Management Group, Inc., an information technology (IT) consulting company that increased revenues by more than 200% in just three years under his leadership. In 2003 he left Johnson-Schley to form J2 Business Solutions, Inc., where he focused on providing executive level IT support as a defense contractor to the U.S. military.

From 2006 through 2010, Johnson served as Chief Information Officer of a global manufacturer of highly engineered electronic components for the transportation industry headquartered in Northeast Ohio. As a member of the executive leadership team, he managed a multi-million dollar departmental budget.

Since first being elected in 2010, Johnson has been fighting to create jobs in Eastern and Southeastern Ohio, improve services to our nation's heroes - our veterans, and to make our federal government more effective, efficient, and accountable to the American people. He's working hard to ensure that our children and grandchildren are blessed with the same opportunities of previous generations. Johnson has led the effort in the House of Representatives to defend the coal industry from executive and bureaucratic overreach, and to secure American energy independence. Nine bills authored by Johnson have been signed into law.

In November of 2018, Johnson was elected to a fifth term to serve the people of Eastern and Southeastern Ohio. Johnson retained his seat on the powerful House Energy & Commerce Committee that is charged with providing a key role in developing America's energy, healthcare, and telecommunications policies (among others), while providing oversight on the Administration's implementation of these laws. Johnson also serves on the House Budget Committee. Additionally, he is the Co-Chairman of the House Natural Gas Caucus and a member of the House Shale Caucus. 

Johnson is the author of the book entitled "Raising Fathers", in which he addresses the importance of fatherhood, and begins confronting the destructive social and cultural impacts caused by the staggering number of America's children that are being raised in fatherless homes.

Congressman Johnson, and his wife LeeAnn, currently reside in Marietta, Ohio with a son, Nathan. Johnson is also the proud parent of three grown children: Joshua, Julie, and Jessica, and is a grandfather of six.

Suzanne Bonamici
Oregon-1
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Suzanne Bonamici

Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici has represented the First Congressional District of Oregon since February of 2012. The district includes Washington, Yamhill, Clatsop, and Columbia counties and part of Multnomah County.

Strengthening public education is one of Suzanne's top priorities and one of the reasons she got involved in public service. Suzanne spent hundreds of hours volunteering in public schools before serving in the Oregon State Legislature, where she passed legislation to reduce duplicative testing. In Congress, she is a leader on the Education and Labor Committee and Chair of the Subcommittee on Civil Rights and Human Services. The Congresswoman has long been an advocate for equity in education policy and funding. She is dedicated to setting national policies that give students the support and opportunities they need to succeed in school and in life. She played a lead role in the passage of the bipartisan Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which replaces No Child Left Behind, reduces testing, puts more focus on well-rounded education, and gives more decision-making back to states and local districts.

Suzanne worked her way through college in Eugene, first at Lane Community College and then at the University of Oregon, where she earned her bachelor's degree and law degree. She is focused on making college more affordable and providing workers with in-demand skills to enter the workforce. Suzanne is the founder and co-chair of the bipartisan Congressional STEAM Caucus, which encourages innovation and creative thinking by integrating arts and design with Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math education.

Suzanne is honored to serve on the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis, where she will fight for comprehensive policies that mitigate the effects of climate change, strengthen the economy, and protect our planet for future generations. She also serves as a member of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, and previously served as the top Democratic member on the Subcommittee on the Environment. From this position, she worked to defend science, address the causes and consequences of climate change, and make sure that policy decisions are based on independent science. As a representative of coastal Oregon and co-chair of the House Oceans Caucus and Congressional Estuary Caucus, she is working to draw attention to issues that affect coastal communities.

In Congress, Suzanne is fighting to help working families get ahead and to build an economy that gives everyone the opportunity to succeed. She is a strong advocate for retirement security. In addition to protecting and strengthening Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid, Suzanne also advocates for policies that help workers save for retirement. Suzanne also supports paid family leave, raising the federal minimum wage, making sure workers have a voice on the job, and workforce development programs. Suzanne is vigilant about making sure that women have access to a full range of family planning services, including abortion.

During college and law school, Suzanne worked at Lane County Legal Aid. After law school, Suzanne was an attorney at the Federal Trade Commission in Washington, D.C., where she was in the Credit Practices Division of the Bureau of Consumer Protection. She then practiced law in Portland, where she represented individuals and small businesses. Suzanne has brought her commitment to consumer protection and access to justice to her work in Congress.

Suzanne and her husband Michael have two grown children.

Greg Walden
Oregon-2
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Greg Walden

U.S. Rep. Greg Walden represents the people of Oregon's Second Congressional District, which includes 20 counties in central, southern, and eastern Oregon. Walden, 63, is a lifelong Oregonian whose ancestors came to Oregon by wagon train in 1845. 

He and his wife Mylene celebrated 38 years of marriage in August 2020, and make their home in Hood River where they’ve been small business owners since 1986.  Their son, Anthony graduated from Hood River Valley High School and Wake Forest University.  His parents are graduates of the University of Oregon.

Walden and his wife spent more than two decades as radio station owners in the Gorge.  He’s also a licensed amateur radio operator (W7EQI).  He put that small business and technology experience to work as chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Communications and Technology.  In this role, he worked to pass legislation to grow American jobs by expanding access to wireless broadband, spur new U.S. technology and innovation, and protect the Internet from government control.

His work in support of Oregon’s rural farm and ranch economy has earned him local and national recognition.  He’s helped write and pass bipartisan legislation to expedite treatment of fire-prone forests, and continues to work across the aisle to find natural resource solutions. The House has also passed bipartisan legislation Walden has championed to fix broken federal forest policy to restore forest health and put people back to work in the woods, as well as legislation (now law) to bring more water and power to Central Oregon for job creation. 

Walden’s experience as a former member of the Hood River Memorial Hospital Board of Trustees and as a former member of the Oregon Health Sciences University Foundation Board have helped in his work to improve access to affordable health care, especially in rural communities.  His successful efforts have earned him national and local awards. 

Walden has also worked hard to ensure that Oregon service members and veterans receive the benefits they have earned through years of brave service. 

In November 2014, Walden’s House Republican colleagues unanimously reelected him to serve as chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC).

In the 116th Congress, Walden serves as the Republican Leader of the Energy and Commerce Committee.

Peter DeFazio
Oregon-4
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Peter DeFazio

Congressman Peter DeFazio was first elected to the U.S. Congress in 1986 and is now the longest serving House member in Oregon’s history.  As the dean of the Oregon House delegation, he has developed a reputation as an independent, passionate and effective lawmaker.

In 2019, DeFazio was elected to the powerful position of Chairman of the House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee, which has jurisdiction over the Coast Guard, highways and transit, water resources, railroads, aviation, and economic development.  

DeFazio has served as a member of the House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee since he first entered Congress in 1987. During his time on the Committee, he has served as Chairman or Ranking Member of four of the six subcommittees: Aviation, Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation, Highways and Transit, and Water Resources and Environment. DeFazio has taken a lead role on several multi-billion dollar surface transportation and FAA reauthorization bills, and worked to strengthen Buy America standards. In 2005, DeFazio served as the Ranking Member on the Highways Subcommittee where he helped negotiate a five-year federal highway and transit spending bill called SAFETEA-LU. Under the bill DeFazio secured $2.7 billion for Oregon's roads, bridges, highways and transit systems. More recently, DeFazio introduced the Repeal and Rebuild Act (HR 4848), a long-term solution to replenish the Highway Trust Fund. (Read more about HR 4848 here.)

DeFazio previously served as the Ranking Member on the House Natural Resources Committee, where he focused on energy, federal lands, ocean and fisheries, and Native American issues. In 2013, he successfully passed his balanced, bipartisan O&C solution that creates private sector jobs, provides revenues to failing counties, and permanently protects old-growth and other irreplaceable environmental treasures.

DeFazio and his wife, Myrnie Daut, live in Springfield, Oregon. He has logged roughly five million miles traveling between Oregon and Washington, DC. DeFazio has voted against and refused to accept congressional pay raises while the government is deficit spending. Instead, he has used his pay raises to fund scholarships at five southwestern Oregon community colleges. As of the end of 2019, DeFazio has contributed more than $369,921 of after-tax salary toward 278 scholarships. He counts these scholarships among his proudest accomplishments.

Guy Reschenthaler
Pennsylvania-14
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Guy Reschenthaler

Congressman Guy Reschenthaler was sworn into office on January 3, 2019 to represent Pennsylvania’s 14th Congressional District including Washington, Fayette, Greene, and portions of Westmoreland Counties.

The son of former teachers, Guy was raised in southwestern Pennsylvania, graduated from Penn State, The Behrend College, and completed law school at Duquesne University.

After law school, Guy fulfilled a lifelong dream and joined the U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General Corps and volunteered for duty in Iraq.

In Baghdad, Guy prosecuted nearly 100 terrorists, including some of Iraq’s most dangerous terrorists. He also successfully defended a Navy SEAL falsely accused of mishandling the Butcher of Fallujah.

Stateside, he served as a Navy lawyer in Norfolk, Va. and then in Texas and Oklahoma, where he was the first uniformed military officer ever to share in the prestigious Michael Taylor Shelby Award, given annually by the Southern District of Texas Chapter of the Federal Bar Association for outstanding ethics and professionalism.

Back home in southwestern Pennsylvania, Guy worked in private practice at a multi-state law firm and was elected Magisterial District Judge, winning the nomination of both parties.

Congressman Reschenthaler previously served in the State Senate representing portions of Allegheny and Washington County. In the State Senate, Reschenthaler’s priorities included improving education opportunities, limiting government and lowering taxes, and reforming the pension system.

Mike Doyle
Pennsylvania-18
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Mike Doyle

Mike Doyle is currently serving his thirteenth term in Congress representing the 18th District of Pennsylvania, which includes the City of Pittsburgh and 53 other communities in Allegheny County.

His top priorities include creating jobs and revitalizing communities in the 18th District through economic development and high-tech initiatives, reforming health care, providing better public education, and establishing a comprehensive national energy strategy to curb climate change and create green jobs.

Congressman Doyle serves on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which is one of only four exclusive committees in the House. There he sits on the subcommittees on: 1) Energy and 2) Communications and Technology. As of January 2019, Congressman Doyle serves as the Chairman of the Communications and Technology Subcommittee.

Congressman Doyle has been working aggressively on the Energy and Commerce Committee to address climate change through the development of new, more energy-efficient technology and alternative and renewable sources of energy. He has also been working hard on the Energy and Commerce Committee to restore Net Neutrality and promote the availability of reliable, affordable, high-speed broadband internet service for all Americans.

Congressman Doyle is a member in the House Democratic Caucus and the founder and co-chair of the Congressional Autism Caucus, also known as the Coalition for Autism Research and Education (C.A.R.E.).

He is also one of the founders and co-chairs of the House Distributed Generation Caucus, which works to promote the widespread adoption of decentralized power generation technology that is both fuel efficient and environmentally friendly and reduces peak demands on our nation's over-utilized electricity transmission grid – and he is a member of the House Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Caucus, which promotes hydrogen and fuel cells.

Congressman Doyle also co-founded and chairs the House Robotics Caucus, which works to ensure that our nation remains globally competitive in the field of robotics.

Doyle also serves on several other important Caucuses, such as Steel, Human Rights, and the Internet.

He is a member of the Leadership Pittsburgh Alumni Organization, the Ancient Order of Hibernians (AOH), the Italian Sons and Daughters of America (ISDA), and the Penn State Alumni Association.

Doyle is a graduate of Penn State University, where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Community Development in 1975. Prior to serving in Congress, Doyle was a small business owner and the Chief of Staff for State Senator Frank Pecora. Doyle and his wife, Susan, reside in Forest Hills and have four children: Michael, David, Kevin, and Alexandra.

Matt Cartwright
Pennsylvania-8
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Matt Cartwright

U.S. Representative Matt Cartwright represents Pennsylvania’s 8th Congressional District and was first sworn into Congress on January 3, 2013.  In Congress, Matt is committed to working across the aisle to advocate for working families.  Matt’s priorities include strengthening the middle class, creating jobs, ensuring quality health care, protecting seniors, and supporting veterans and military families.  Matt has introduced over 60 pieces of legislation and more bipartisan bills than any other House Democrat.

Matt serves on the powerful House Appropriations Committee, and is on the Appropriations Subcommittees for Commerce—Justice—Science; Financial Services & General Government; and Military Construction/Veterans Affairs.  He is also a member of the House Natural Resources Committee.  Matt is also one of the co-chairs of the House Democratic Policy and Communications Committee (DPCC).

Matt graduated magna cum laude with a history degree from Hamilton College in 1983.  He earned his J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1986, where he was a member of law review.

Matt lives in Moosic with his wife, Marion Munley Cartwright.  They have two sons, Jack and Matthew.

Dan Meuser
Pennsylvania-9
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Dan Meuser

Dan Meuser is a conservative business leader who brings his experience as a proven job creator, dedicated public servant, and proactive member of his community to Congress.

Dan grew up in a middle-class family, his father was a police officer and his mother returned to work once Dan and his siblings began school. Dan attended the New York Maritime University and studied economics at Cornell University on a Navy ROTC scholarship.

Dan joined Pride Mobility Products in 1988, a small healthcare products manufacturer that he helped grow into an industry leader in power mobility over two decades. While at Pride, Dan helped create thousands of quality jobs and the company was named one of the best places to work in Pennsylvania. Pride Mobility employs hundreds of Pennsylvanians, and its products improve the quality of life for people around the world. Dan served as President of Pride USA for seven years.

In 2011, Governor-elect Tom Corbett nominated Dan to serve as Pennsylvania’s Secretary of Revenue. There, he worked to reform the Department of Revenue, making it more efficient and focused on helping taxpayers. His experience in business helped him bring the Department into the 21st Century with innovative technological advances and procedural improvements.

Dan’s leadership of the Department was recognized by the Council on State Taxation for the most dramatic improvement of any department of revenue in the country, going from a D rating to an A- during his tenure.

In 2019, Dan Meuser was sworn in as a member of the 116th Congress representing Pennsylvania’s 9th Congressional District. Today, Dan is putting his experience and conservative values to work to make our economy stronger and our nation safer. He’s accessible and active in our community. Dan is a problem solver and he never forgets that he works for the hardworking families of Pennsylvania’s 9th District.

In the 116th Congress, Congressman Meuser serves on the House Budget, Veterans' Affairs, and Education & Labor Committees.

Dan and his wife of 29 years, Shelley, have two daughters and a son, and live in Luzerne County, PA.

Joe Cunningham
South Carolina-
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Joe Cunningham

Joe Cunningham proudly represents South Carolina’s First Congressional District. The First District encompasses South Carolina’s Lowcountry, including Charleston, Mt. Pleasant, Kiawah, and Hilton Head. Joe is a proud father and husband and is serving his first term in the United States Congress.

Joe currently serves on the House Natural Resources Committee and the House Veterans' Affairs Committee. The Committee on Natural Resources oversees federal conservation programs, establishes renewable energy sources, and critically to the Lowcountry, monitors offshore oil and gas development. The Lowcountry's vibrant natural resources are vital to its economy and way of life, and Joe is proud to use his seat at the table to work to protect them. South Carolina's First Congressional District has the highest amount of veterans in the state of South Carolina. Joe is honored to serve on the House Veterans' Affairs Committee and ensure Lowcountry veterans and their families receive the best and most reliable care, services, and benefits. 

Prior to his election to Congress, Joe was an attorney and an ocean engineer. In Congress, Joe’s priorities include reinstating the ban on offshore drilling off the Atlantic coast, infrastructure investment, protecting and creating Lowcountry jobs, combating climate change and lowering the cost of health care and prescription drugs. As a former ocean engineer, Joe knows firsthand how destructive drilling for oil can be to a coastline and is committed to protecting South Carolina’s coastline and economy from offshore drilling. Joe has spent his life working with others to get things done and is committed to breaking through the political tribalism facing Washington.

Joe attended the College of Charleston, obtained his B.S. in Ocean Engineering from Florida Atlantic University in 2005,  and his J.D. from Northern Kentucky University in 2014. He currently lives on James Island with his wife, Amanda, their son, Boone, and their dog, Teddy.

Jim Clyburn
South Carolina-6
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Jim Clyburn

James E. Clyburn is the Majority Whip, the third-ranking Democrat in the United States House of Representatives, and currently serves as the Chairman of the House Select Committee on the Coronavirus Crisis.  He is also the Chairman of the Rural Broadband Task Force and Democratic Faith Working Group.  

When he came to Congress in 1993 to represent South Carolina’s sixth congressional district, Congressman Clyburn was elected co-president of his freshman class and quickly rose through leadership ranks. He was subsequently elected Chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, Vice Chairman, and later Chairman, of the House Democratic Caucus. He previously served as Majority Whip from 2007 to 2011 and served as Assistant Democratic Leader from 2011 to 2019.  

As a national leader, he has championed rural and economic development and many of his initiatives have become law.  His 10-20-30 federal funding formula was included in four sections of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.  Congressman Clyburn is also a passionate supporter of historic preservation and restoration programs.  His efforts have restored scores of historic buildings and sites on the campuses of historically black colleges and universities.  His legislation created the South Carolina National Heritage Corridor and the Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor, elevated the Congaree National Monument to a National Park, and established the Reconstruction Era National Monument in South Carolina’s Lowcountry.  

Congressman Clyburn’s humble beginnings in Sumter, South Carolina as the eldest son of an activist, fundamentalist minister and an independent, civic-minded beautician grounded him securely in family, faith and public service. His memoir, Blessed Experiences: Genuinely Southern, Proudly Black, was published in 2015, and has been described ‎as a primer that should be read by every student interested in pursuing a career in public service.  

Congressman Clyburn and his late wife, Emily England Clyburn, met as students at South Carolina State and were married for 58 years. They are the parents of three daughters; Mignon Clyburn, Jennifer Reed, and Angela Hannibal and four grandchildren.

Tim Burchett
Tennessee-2
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Tim Burchett

Congressman Tim Burchett took office in January 2019 after serving eight years as mayor of Knox County, Tennessee. During his administration, he cut debt, kept tax rates low, and paid for a new elementary school without adding debt. Before that, he started a successful small business before serving 16 years in the state legislature, four years in the State House followed by 12 years in the State Senate. Congressman Burchett currently serves on the House Budget, Foreign Affairs, and Small Business committees. His goals include supporting veterans, identifying free-market healthcare solutions and facilitating energy independence.

Jim Cooper
Tennessee-5
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Jim Cooper

Congressman Jim Cooper was born and raised in Tennessee. He and Martha, his wife of thirty-three years, live in Nashville and have three children.

A New York Times columnist called him "the House's conscience, a lonely voice for civility in this ugly era" and a "tart-tongued moderate" who "seeks bipartisanship on fiscal matters and other issues in a polarized political climate." USA Today named him one of the "Brave 38" of a "tiny band of heroes" in Congress for his work on a bipartisan budget plan.

In Congress, he's known for his work on the federal budget, health care and government reform. 

Vicente Gonzalez
Texas-15
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Vicente Gonzalez

Vicente Gonzalez is currently serving his second term in the United States Congress as the elected representative of the 15th District of Texas which encompasses the growing suburban counties of Brooks, Duval, Guadalupe, Jim Hogg, Karnes, and Live Oak as well as portions of Hidalgo, and Wilson counties. Congressman Vicente Gonzalez came to Washington to continue fighting for South Texans and ensure that individuals and communities have the resources and opportunities they need to succeed.

Congressman Gonzalez earned his GED in 1985 before attending Del Mar College where he received an Associate’s degree in Banking and Finance in 1990. He worked his way through college at Embry Riddle University where many of his classmates were active duty military personnel. He earned a Bachelor’s degree in Business Aviation in 1992 and later earned a Juris Doctorate degree from Texas Wesleyan University School of Law (now Texas A&M School of Law) in 1996. While attending law school, Congressman Gonzalez worked as an intern in the office of former Congressman Solomon P. Ortiz. In 1997, Congressman Gonzalez opened his law practice, V. Gonzalez & Associates.

Congressman Gonzalez was influenced by his father, a Korean War veteran, to help individuals fight for their rights and practiced law for 20 years. He stood with working families wronged by powerful corporations and took on unscrupulous vendors, recovering millions in school bond revenues for taxpayers. In Congress, he is fighting to protect Social Security and Medicare and to ensure that veterans, military members, and their families have the care and compensation they earned through their service. He is committed to improving health care for those who need it most: children, people with special needs, veterans, and seniors.

As a small business owner, Congressman Gonzalez understands the challenges facing American businesses. He serves on the House Committee on Financial Services. In Congress, he is working across party lines and with local, state, and federal government to expand economic opportunity for all. He serves on the Subcommittees on Investor Protection, Entrepreneurship and Capital Markets; Housing, Community Development and Insurance; and Diversity and Inclusion.

In his second term, Congressman Gonzalez was appointed to the House Foreign Affairs Committee to promote stability, safety, success, and security around the world. In the 115th Congress, Congressman Gonzalez advocated for revamping American foreign policy in Central America, supported progress for the State of Israel, celebrated the inauguration of Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obradaor and a fresh start for U.S.-Mexico bilateral relations, and sought the de-escalation of tensions on the Korean Peninsula. He serves on the Subcommittees on Western Hemisphere, Civilian Security, and Trade; and Europe, Eurasia, Energy, and the Environment.

A lifetime resident of South Texas, Congressman Gonzalez is married to Lorena Saenz Gonzalez, a former teacher and school administrator in Edinburg and McAllen. They reside in McAllen. 

Veronica Escobar
Texas-16
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Veronica Escobar

Congresswoman Veronica Escobar, a third-generation El Pasoan, proudly represents Texas’ 16th Congressional District.

She took office on January 3, 2019 as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives after making history as the first woman elected to this seat and the first of two Latinas from Texas to serve in Congress.

Congresswoman Escobar serves on the prestigious House Judiciary Committee and House Armed Services Committee.

She was elected by her colleagues to serve as Co-Freshman Representative to Leadership in the 116th Congress, and in that capacity serves as a member of the House Democratic Leadership Team.

She holds leadership positions on both the Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHC) and the Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC), as the Freshman Representative and Vice Chair, respectively. She also Vice Chair of the Democratic Women’s Caucus. She is a member of the New Democrat Coalition, and the Women’s Working Group on Immigration, where she serves as Co-Chair.

In Congress, she has established herself as a national leading voice on immigration, including fighting the Trump administration’s inhumane and cruel policies that harm border communities. She has led legislation to address our nation’s immigration challenges in a responsible and humane manner by ensuring accountability, transparency, and oversight.

On February 4, 2020, Congresswoman Escobar delivered the Spanish-language Democratic response to President Trump's State of the Union address. She gave the nationally televised speech from Centro de Salud Familiar La Fe, a community health clinic, in El Paso.

Before her election, she served on the governing body for El Paso County, first as a County Commissioner and then as County Judge. There, she fought back against those who used government for their own personal gain and worked with her colleagues to modernize and reform the organization. She also worked to make El Paso County a leader in expanding access to healthcare by working with the University Medical Center of El Paso to build primary care clinics and the El Paso Children’s Hospital, the only children’s hospital on the U.S.-Mexico Border.

Prior to her service with El Paso County, Congresswoman Escobar was an English teacher at the University of Texas at El Paso and El Paso Community College, Communications Director for former Mayor Raymond Caballero, and the Executive Director of Community Scholars, a non-profit that taught high school students how to produce public policy reports and recommendations.

Congresswoman Escobar and her husband Michael have two children: Cristian Diego and Eloisa Isabel, and they live in Central El Paso.

Joaquin Castro
Texas-20
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Joaquin Castro

Joaquin has worked hard to seize the opportunities created by the sacrifices of his grandmother and prior generations. After finishing high school a year early, Joaquin left San Antonio to graduate with honors from Stanford University in 1996. He then went on to attend Harvard Law School where he received his Juris Doctorate degree in 2000. Upon his return to San Antonio at 28 years old, Joaquin joined a private law practice and was elected to the Texas Legislature. He served five terms as state representative for District 125. In 2012, Joaquin was elected to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives as representative of Texas' 20th Congressional District, which covers a large portion of San Antonio and Bexar County. Joaquin’s identical twin brother, Julián Castro, was elected in 2013 to his third term as Mayor of San Antonio. On July 28, 2014, Julian Castro was sworn in as Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). 

Joaquin’s respect for public service developed at a young age and was deeply influenced by his parents’ involvement in political movements and civic causes. His father, a retired teacher, and his mother, a renowned community activist, instilled in him a deep appreciation for the democratic process and the importance of serving one’s community.

Despite a difficult political environment during his time as state legislator, Joaquin transcended partisan gridlock to help restore millions of dollars in funding to critical health care and education programs. As Vice Chairman of the Higher Education Committee and Democratic Floor Leader in the Texas House, he was also at the forefront in proposing forward-thinking legislative reforms in the areas of mental health, teen pregnancy, and juvenile justice.

Now in his fourth term in the U.S. House of Representatives, Joaquin serves on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, as well as the House Foreign Affairs Committee and the House Education and Labor Committee. He was the 2013 Co-President for the House freshman Democrats and currently serves as Chair of the Texas Democratic Caucus. 

Outside of the legislative chamber, Joaquin has demonstrated a strong commitment to his community. He created the Trailblazers College Tour, personally raising money to send underprivileged students on college visits, giving them exposure to some of the nation’s best institutions of higher education. He also founded SA READS, San Antonio’s largest literacy campaign and book drive. Over 200,000 books have been distributed to more than 150 schools and shelters across the city. To honor and express gratitude to San Antonio grandparents and other family members raising relatives who aren’t their children, Joaquin created the annual Families Helping Families dinner and awards. He has also taught as a visiting professor of law at St. Mary’s University and as an adjunct professor at Trinity University. Joaquin is active on several boards of education-related, non-profit organizations, including the National College Advising Corps, and the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials’ (NALEO) Taskforce on Education. 

Having experienced America’s promise firsthand, Joaquin wants to help build out what he calls the Infrastructure of Opportunity so that future generations will have the same chance to pursue their American Dream. Joaquin believes that just as there is an infrastructure of transportation that helps us get to where we want to go on the road there is an Infrastructure of Opportunity that helps Americans get to where they want to go in life. It is that Infrastructure of Opportunity – great public schools and universities, a sound healthcare system, and good-paying jobs –  that enables Americans to pursue their American Dream. Our centuries-long commitment to building and preserving this infrastructure is what distinguishes America among the nations of the world.

As Congressman, Joaquin continues to be a tireless advocate for those who call San Antonio home. From supporting military families to investing in education, Joaquin remains committed to helping mold an Infrastructure of Opportunity for San Antonians and Americans around the country.

Henry Cuellar
Texas-28
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Henry Cuellar

Serving his eighth term in the U.S. House of Representatives, Congressman Henry Cuellar proudly represents Texas’ 28th congressional district, which includes the cities of Laredo, Mission, Rio Grande City, and San Antonio. Congressman Cuellar supports equal opportunity for men and women of all backgrounds. His legislative principles are based on the belief that education, family values and hard work should open doors to new opportunities for all Americans. 

Congressman Cuellar serves as the only Texas Democrat on the powerful U.S. House Appropriations Committee. He is the Vice Chair of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security, while also serving on the Defense Subcommittee and the Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies.  Congressman Cuellar was named Chief Deputy Whip for the 116th Congress, where he works in a bipartisan manner to serve the American people.

As one of eight children born to migrant farm workers in Laredo, Texas, Congressman Cuellar was raised with a passion for education and an unwavering work ethic, as he sought to attain his educational goals. As the most degreed member of Congress, he credits his education with informing his public service to Texas.

After earning his associate degree from Laredo Community College Summa Cum Laude, he enrolled in Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. Here, while working part-time jobs to accord his graduate degree, the Congressman still managed to graduate Cum Laude, a reflection to his academic commitment. When he returned to Texas, Congressman Cuellar completed a master’s degree in International Trade at Texas A&M International University (TAMIU) and earned both a Juris Doctor and Ph.D. in Government from the University of Texas at Austin. Recently, Dr. Cuellar received a Professional Certificate in Budget and Finance from Georgetown University

In 1981, Congressman Cuellar started practicing law and later became a licensed customs broker in 1983 and taught at Laredo State University (TAMIU) as an Adjunct Professor for International Commercial Law from 1984 to 1986. The following year, Congressman Cuellar decided to fully dedicate his life to public service and served as a Texas State Representative, Texas Secretary of State and now as a U.S. Congressman. Dr. Cuellar has been an educator, lawyer and small business owner.

Congressman Cuellar and his wife, Imelda, reside in Laredo, Texas with their two daughters, Christy and Catie.

John Carter
Texas-31
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John Carter

U.S. Representative John R. Carter represents Texas' 31st Congressional District, which includes Williamson and Bell counties. In the 116th Congress, Rep. Carter sits on the Appropriations Defense Subcommittee, and he is the ranking member on the Appropriations Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Subcommittee. In addition, he serves as co-chairman of the bipartisan House Army Caucus and is a member of the House Republican Steering Committee, a leadership position.

Since his first election in 2002, Congressman Carter has established himself as a leader in Congress who has the foresight and courage to author and support numerous pieces of legislation that would increase the protection of U.S. citizens and bring justice to those who threaten our freedom and way of life.

Congressman Carter is one of the few House members who has authored legislation signed into law under Presidents Bush, Obama and Trump. Despite being a veteran congressman, John Carter is still known as "Judge" for having served over 20 years on the district court bench in Williamson County, which he won as the first countywide elected Republican in Williamson County in modern history. Before becoming a judge, Congressman Carter had a successful private law practice and continued to practice law while serving as the municipal judge in Round Rock.

A true Texan at heart, Congressman Carter was born and raised in Houston and has spent his adult life in Central Texas. Carter attended Texas Tech University, where he graduated with a degree in history and then graduated from the University of Texas Law School in 1969. Congressman Carter and his wife, Erika, met in Holland and have been happily married since June 15, 1968. Since then, they have built a home and raised a family of four on Christian beliefs and strong Texas values. Congressman Carter and Mrs. Carter are also proud grandparents to six precious grandchildren.

Marc Veasey
Texas-33
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Marc Veasey

Rep. Veasey is an advocate for Texas’ middle-class families and is committed to creating jobs, improving public education, fighting for immigration reform, and ensuring access to quality healthcare and women’s reproductive rights. 

Congressman Veasey was appointed in the 116th Congress to serve on the Committee on Energy and Commerce. Prior to his new committee appointments, Rep. Veasey served on the Armed Services Committee and the Committee on Science Space and Technology.

Throughout his time in Congress, Rep. Veasey founded the first Congressional Voting Rights Caucus to address the immediate need to eliminate the barriers and discrimination too many Americans face at the polls. In the 114th Congress, he accepted his appointment as an Assistant and Regional Whip. In the 116th Congress, the Congressman was appointed to serve as a Whip for the Gun Violence Prevention Taskforce.

Rep. Veasey is currently a member of the U.S. Helsinki Commission, Congressional Black Caucus and the New Democrat Coalition. He also co-launched the Blue Collar Caucus with Congressman Brendan Boyle to find solutions to problems too many middle-class Americans are facing. The Blue Collar Caucus supports unions and focuses on addressing wage stagnation, offshoring, and job insecurity for those in the manufacturing and building trades.

First elected to the Texas State House in 2004, Congressman Veasey represented District 95 – an area now part of the 33rd Congressional District. As a member of the Texas State House, Rep. Veasey served in a number of leadership positions including Democratic Whip and Chair of the Democratic Caucus. 

Issues he championed included fighting for affordable healthcare, funding for better schools, and advocating for a livable wage. Prior to serving four terms in the Texas House of Representatives, Rep. Veasey worked as a congressional staffer in North Texas for Congressman Martin Frost.

The Congressman was born and raised in Fort Worth, Texas.  He and his wife Tonya live in the Metroplex and have a thirteen-year-son, Adam.

Rep. Veasey earned a BS from Texas Wesleyan University, where he majored in Mass Communication.

Filemon Vela
Texas-34
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Filemon Vela

Congressman Filemon Vela represents the 34th Congressional District of Texas, which is anchored in Cameron County in the southernmost tip of Texas, and runs nearly 300 miles north to Gonzales County. The 34th District includes Brownsville, its largest city, as well as the King Ranch, Kingsville Naval Air Station, and the historic Texas town of Goliad. 

Born in Harlingen, Texas, and raised in Brownsville, Congressman Vela’s roots run deep in South Texas. His ancestors purchased land from the McAllen family to establish the Laguna Seca Ranch where the first citrus orchard in Hidalgo County was planted. President Jimmy Carter appointed Congressman Vela’s father, Filemon Vela Sr., as one of the first Hispanic federal judges, where he presided over the Southern District of Texas. Congressman Vela’s mother, Blanca Sanchez Vela, served as the first, and to this day the only, female mayor of Brownsville.

Vela attended Saint Joseph Academy in Brownsville, Texas. After graduating from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., he attended the University of Texas School of Law. His interest in public service grew from his work helping individuals seek justice in state and federal courts as an attorney for more than 20 years in South Texas.

Congressman Vela is a member of the House Agriculture Committee, where he serves as the Chairman of the General Farm Commodities and Risk Management Subcommittee. Vela joined the panel in 2013 at the beginning of his first Congressional term and served as the Vice-Ranking Member of the full committee during the 115th Congress. He was the only Texas Democrat appointed by the House of Representatives’ Leadership to serve as a negotiator on the Conference Committee which drafted the 2014 Farm Bill, and was closely involved in its reauthorization in 2018. The Farm Bill is a comprehensive law which sets agriculture policy and funding for nutrition programs, including food stamps, for the next five years. Additionally, Congressman Vela holds seats on the Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture and the Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit.

Congressman Vela also sits on the House Armed Services Committee, where he has fought to ensure that U.S. servicemembers are prepared to respond to a range of military operations. He is committed to ensuring that servicemembers and their families have access to housing, healthcare and basic living necessities to sustain them through the challenges of military service. Congressman Vela is a member of the Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces and the Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces.

In Congress, Vela has been a strong advocate for immigrant rights, education programs—including Head Start and Pell Grants for college students—and community health centers. He is vehemently opposed to the construction of a border wall and is focused on bringing peace and security to our neighbors in Matamoros and Reynosa. He is also working to bring jobs and economic development to South Texas through many efforts, including transforming the Port of Brownsville into a competitive deep water port. 

Congressman Vela is married to Rose Vela, a former Justice on the Texas Court of Appeals, and they reside in Brownsville, Texas.

Lloyd Doggett
Texas-35
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Lloyd Doggett

U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett represents communities from San Antonio to Austin. He serves as Chairman of the Heath Subcommittee on the House Ways & Means Committee, the oldest committee of the United States Congress. Doggett is also a member of the Ways and Means Select Revenue Measures Subcommittee, the Joint Committee on Taxation, and the House Budget Committee.

Save the Children recognized his leadership with the Congressional Champion for Real and Lasting Change Award. AARP honored him twice, once with its Legislative Achievement Award for his leadership on Medicare, and again with its Legislative Leadership Award for his efforts to preserve seniors' access to healthcare. He received the “Vision Award” from the Power of Preservation Foundation for his commitment to historic preservation. He was also awarded the "Champion of Music" award by the Texas Chapter of The Recording Academy, which sponsors the Grammy Awards, and has been recognized 11 times by the Austin Chronicle's "Best of Austin" list. He is a leader in the effort to lower prescription drug prices, and authored bills that established the Commission to End Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities and successfully enacted a higher-education tax credit.

While a student at The University of Texas at Austin, he was elected student body president and graduated first in his class from the College of Business Administration. He then graduated with Honors from Texas Law, where he served as Associate Editor of the Texas Law Review. Elected to the Texas Senate soon after, Congressman Doggett became known for his untiring work ethic. He authored 124 state laws, including one which created the Texas Commission on Human Rights to prohibit discrimination, and another called the Texas Sunset Act, which sought greater efficiency and accountability by requiring periodic review of government agencies.

Prior to coming to Congress, Congressman Doggett served as Justice to the Texas Supreme Court, he wrote opinions supporting the right to a trial by jury and authored an important rule bolstering the public's access to information. He served as Chair of the Supreme Court Task Force on Judicial Ethics and was recognized as an Outstanding Judge in Texas by the Mexican-American Bar of Texas. He was awarded the James Madison Award from the Freedom of Information Foundation of Texas, and received the First Amendment Award from the National Society of Professional Journalists. 

Since Lloyd Doggett was elected to the United States House of Representatives, he has served as a strong defender of Social Security, Medicare, health care, immigration reform, the environment, our veterans, and public education. The Texas Association of Mexican American Chambers of Commerce has named Congressman Doggett the Government Hispanic Business Advocate of the Year. To learn more about Representative Doggett and his legislative priorities, you can visit the Issues page of this site.

Representative Doggett’s wife, Libby, recently served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Early Learning at the U.S. Department of Education. They have two daughters: Lisa, an Austin physician; and Cathy, who leads teams across Texas that work with new, disadvantaged parents. The Doggetts have four grandchildren: Ella, Clara, Zayla, and Canyon.

Lizzie Fletcher
Texas-7
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Lizzie Fletcher

Lizzie Fletcher represents Texas’ Seventh Congressional District, in the greater Houston area.  Located entirely within Harris County, the district includes residents of Houston, Bellaire, Bunker Hill Village, Hedwig Village, Hilshire Village, Hunters Creek Village, Jersey Village, Piney Point Village, Southside Place, Spring Valley Village, West University Place, and unincorporated Harris County west to Katy.

A resident of Houston and Congressional District 7 nearly all of her life, Congresswoman Fletcher was elected to represent the district in 2018.  Prior to her election, she represented Houstonians in the courtroom as a lawyer on a wide range of matters, first at an international law firm headquartered in Houston and later at a boutique litigation firm, where she became its first woman partner.

Congresswoman Fletcher graduated from Kenyon College in Ohio in 1997, where she earned highest honors in History and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. After college, she worked in the business and non-profit sectors for six years before attending William & Mary Law School in Virginia.  At William & Mary, she was the editor-in-chief of the William & Mary Law Review and received the Gambrell Professionalism Award when she graduated in 2006.

In the 116th Congress, Congresswoman Fletcher serves on House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure and House Science, Space, and Technology Committee.

Al Green
Texas-9
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Al Green

On January 3, 2019, U.S. Congressman Al Green took the oath of office to serve the people of Texas’ 9th Congressional District and began his eighth term in the United States House of Representatives. As a veteran civil rights advocate, he has fought for those in society whose voices, too often, are not heard.

Congressman Al Green currently serves on the Financial Services Committee as well as the Committee on Homeland Security. On the Financial Services Committee, he serves on three subcommittees: Diversity and Inclusion; Housing, Community Development,  and Insurance;  as well as Oversight and Investigations, where he holds the position of Chair. On the Committee on Homeland Security, he serves on two subcommittees: Emergency Preparedness, Response, & Recovery and Border Security, Facilitation, & Operations. Within the Democratic Party he holds the position of Assistant Whip.

Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Congressman Al Green’s family taught him the importance of positive preparation through education and righteous resistance to overcome persistent injustice. He attended Florida A&M University, Howard University, and the Tuskegee Institute. Without receiving an undergraduate degree, he enrolled in the Thurgood Marshall School of Law, where he earned his Juris Doctorate in 1973. As a law student, he earned awards in Federal Procedure and Conflicts.

After graduating from law school, Congressman Al Green co-founded and co-managed the law firm of Green, Wilson, Dewberry, and Fitch. In 1977, he was appointed Justice of the Peace in Harris County, Texas, where he served for 26 years before retiring in 2004.  Throughout his career, Congressman Al Green has enjoyed the respect of his colleagues as well as a wide cross-section of community leaders, who have praised his legal skills, impeccable character, and ability to work with people of diverse backgrounds.

For approximately ten years, Congressman Al Green served as president of the Houston Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Under his leadership, the organization grew to unprecedented heights, increasing membership from a few hundred to many thousands, and the staff from one to more than ten.

As a testament to his exceptional service to the community, and in recognition of his outstanding professional achievement as well as his superior leadership ability, Congressman Al Green has received numerous awards and accolades. Steadfast in his commitment to serving the communities he represents in Congress, he is a member of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC) as well as the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC). Congressman Green holds memberships in several community organizations, including Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity.

As evidence of how truly blessed Congressman Al Green believes he is, when asked, “How are you?” he often responds, “Better than I deserve.”

Ben McAdams
Utah-4
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Ben McAdams

Congressman Ben McAdams is a seventh-generation Utahn who was raised in a family of eight. That’s where he learned hard work, honesty and duty to the community. He was the twice-elected mayor of Salt Lake County and a former Utah State Senator.

As mayor, he brought Republicans and Democrats together to get things done like addressing homelessness, forming partnerships with the private sector to create jobs and improve education—all while managing a balanced budget. That is the same approach he brings to the U.S. House of Representatives.

He graduated from the University of Utah and Columbia Law School. He practiced law in New York and Utah, assisting businesses with federal securities regulation compliance. In the Utah State Senate, McAdams worked to protect victims of financial fraud and offered legislation to combat consumer fraud.

Congressman McAdams has been selected to serve on the House Financial Services Committee and the House Science, Space and Technology Committee.

He and his wife, fellow Columbia Law graduate, Julie, and their four kids live in Salt Lake City, where they enjoy hiking, soccer, baseball and the many cultural activities offered throughout the state. McAdams is fluent in Portuguese and conversant in Spanish.

Elaine Luria
Virginia-2
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Elaine Luria

U.S. Rep. Elaine Luria represents Virginia’s Second Congressional District. Prior to her election in 2018, Rep. Luria served two decades in the Navy, retiring at the rank of Commander. Rep. Luria served at sea on six ships as a nuclear-trained Surface Warfare Officer, deployed to the Middle East and Western Pacific, and culminated her Navy career by commanding a combat-ready unit of 400 sailors. A member of the House Armed Services Committee and the House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, Rep. Luria was one of the first women in the Navy’s nuclear power program and among the first women to serve the entirety of her career in combatant ships. She leads the House Veterans' Affairs Subcommittee on Disability Assistance and Memorial Affairs, and is Vice Chair of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces. Of all members in the House Democratic Caucus, she served the longest on active duty, having completed 20 years of active military service with the U.S. Navy. Rep. Luria graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy and received a master’s in engineering management from Old Dominion University.

Bobby Scott
Virginia-3
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Bobby Scott

Congressman Robert C. "Bobby" Scott has represented Virginia’s third congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives since 1993.  Prior to his service in Congress, he served in the Virginia House of Delegates from 1978 to 1983 and in the Senate of Virginia from 1983 to 1993.

During his tenure in the Virginia General Assembly, Congressman Scott successfully sponsored laws critical to Virginians in education, employment, health care, social services, economic development, crime prevention and consumer protection.  His legislative successes in the state legislature included laws that increased Virginia’s minimum wage, created the Governor’s Employment and Training Council and improved health care benefits for women, infants and children.  

Congressman Scott has the distinction of being the first African-American elected to Congress from the Commonwealth of Virginia since Reconstruction and only the second African-American elected to Congress in Virginia’s history. Having a maternal grandfather of Filipino ancestry also gives him the distinction of being the first American with Filipino ancestry to serve as a voting member of Congress.

Congressman Scott currently serves as the Chairman of the Committee on Education and Labor. In this capacity, he is advancing an agenda that improves equity in education, frees students from the burdens of crippling debt, protects and expands access to affordable health care, ensures workers have a safe workplace where they can earn a living wage free from discrimination, and guarantees seniors have a secure and dignified retirement.  

From 2015-2018, he served as the ranking member of what was then called the Committee on Education and the Workforce and developed a strong record of working across the aisle to pass critical legislation.  In 2015, he was one of the four primary authors of the Every Student Succeeds Act, which reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act for the first time in 13 years and replaced the No Child Left Behind Act.  Additionally, in 2017, he worked to secure passage of legislation to reform and update our nation’s career and technical education system, as well as the juvenile justice system in 2018, which were both signed into law by President Donald Trump.  The latter legislation, the Juvenile Justice Reform Act, contained core tenets of Congressman Scott’s Youth Prison Reduction through Opportunities, Mentoring, Intervention, Support, and Education (Youth PROMISE) Act, which he had introduced in every Congress since 2007.  

As a part of his effort to provide universal health care for all, prior to the passage of the Affordable Care Act, Congressman Scott sponsored the All Healthy Children Act, which sought to ensure that millions of uninsured children in the United States have access to a comprehensive set of health care services.

Congressman Scott also serves on the Committee on the Budget where he is a leading voice on fiscal policy and reducing the deficit.  He was an ardent opponent of the 2001 and 2003 Bush-era tax cuts that were skewed towards the wealthiest Americans and contributed trillions to the national debt.  He opposed the 2008 taxpayer-funded bailout of Wall Street, the 2013 Fiscal Cliff deal that permanently extended most of the Bush-era tax cuts, and President Trump’s Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.  

Congressman Scott is also a recognized champion of the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights, and he has fought to protect the rights and civil liberties of all Americans.  In 1997, he protected the right of all children with disabilities to obtain a free and appropriate education under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) by leading a successful effort to defeat amendments aimed at curtailing that right for some children.  Congressman Scott also actively opposed passage of the USA PATRIOT Act and has been a leading critic of both Republican and Democratic Administrations' misuse of surveillance authorities.  He is also a leading opponent in Congress of efforts to permit employment discrimination in federally funded programs.

As the former Chairman and Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security on the Committee on the Judiciary, Congressman Scott is also a leading advocate for reforming our nation’s broken criminal justice system. Congressman Scott sponsored the Death in Custody Reporting Act, which was originally signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 2000 and its subsequent reauthorization was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2014. The law requires state and local law enforcement agencies to report to the U.S. Department of Justice how many individuals die each year while in the custody of law enforcement or during the course of an arrest.  In 2010, Congressman Scott successfully led efforts in the House to pass the Fair Sentencing Act, one of the first successful reductions in a mandatory minimum sentence in decades.  The law reduced the unfair sentencing disparity between crack and powder cocaine.  

In 2015, Congressman Scott and Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI) co-authored the Safe, Accountable, Fair, and Effective (SAFE) Justice Act, which has been recognized as one of the most comprehensive criminal justice reform bills in a generation and attracted significant support from across the political spectrum.  Several provisions of the SAFE Justice Act, including retroactive application of the Fair Sentencing Act of 2010 and a fix to how “good time” credits for prisoners are calculated, were included in the First Step Act, a sentencing and prison reform bill signed into law by President Trump in December 2018.

Congressman Scott is also a strong supporter of our nation's military readiness as well as our troops and their safety.  In 2007, he introduced the House version of Senator Jim Webb’s Post-9/11 G.I. Bill, which was signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2008 and has been cited as the largest expansion of veteran education benefits since World War II.  As a member of the Congressional Shipbuilding Caucus, Congressman Scott is a leading advocate for shipbuilding, our shipbuilders, and our men and women in uniform.

In 2010, The Hill, a Capitol Hill newspaper, recognized Congressman Scott as one of the 25 hardest working Members of Congress.  The Hill later recognized him in 2012 as one of Capitol Hill's 50 most beautiful people.

Congressman Scott was born on April 30, 1947 in Washington, D.C. and grew up in Newport News, Virginia.  He is a graduate of Harvard College and Boston College Law School.  After graduating from law school, he returned home to Newport News and practiced law from 1973 to 1991. As a young attorney, he founded the Peninsula Legal Aid Center to assist those who could not afford legal representation.  He received an honorable discharge for his service in the Massachusetts National Guard and the United States Army Reserve.

Congressman Scott is a member of St. Augustine's Episcopal Church in Newport News and is a member of many professional, community, and civic boards and organizations.

Don McEachin
Virginia-4
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Don McEachin

Congressman A. Donald McEachin (VA-04) was first elected to represent the 4th Congressional District of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives on November 8, 2016.

Congressman McEachin has been selected by his colleagues to serve as a Regional Whip, co-chair of the House Democratic Environmental Message Team, Whip of the Congressional Black Caucus, co-chair of the Congressional Black Caucus’ Energy, Environment, and Agriculture Task Force, and vice-chair of the Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition (SEEC). During his first term in Congress, Rep. McEachin co-founded the United for Climate and Environmental Justice Congressional Task Force and continues to lead the task force as a co-chair.

Rep. McEachin represents his constituents, and the Commonwealth of Virginia, as a member of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce (E&C), the House Committee on Natural Resources (Natural Resources), and the Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. As a member of E&C, McEachin sits on the Environment and Climate Change, the Communications and Technology, and the Energy subcommittees. As a member of Natural Resources, McEachin sits on the Energy and Mineral Resources as well as the Oversight and Investigations subcommittees. 

Rep. McEachin is the son of an Army veteran and a public-school teacher who was raised in the area that he now proudly represents in Congress. Prior to his service in Congress, Rep. McEachin served as a legislator in both chambers of Virginia’s General Assembly. Throughout that time, he fought to protect our most vulnerable citizens — and to defend the rights of all Virginians. Rep. McEachin is a dedicated public servant who leads efforts that will promote equality, curb gun violence, protect our environment, and preserve access to affordable health care.

Rep. McEachin graduated from American University with a degree in Political Science and from the University of Virginia School of Law. In May of 2008, he received his Master of Divinity from The Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union University.

Rep. McEachin has always stood up for working Virginians, families and children in need. After practicing with several law firms in Richmond, Rep. McEachin and Donald Gee formed McEachin and Gee, in 1990. The McEachin and Gee Law Firm successfully helped many Virginians receive the resources they needed after accidents or injury.

Rep. McEachin is very active in the community and is a lifetime member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. and the NAACP. Rep. McEachin is also a member of the Virginia State Bar and the Virginia Trial Lawyers Association.

Rep. McEachin and his lovely wife Colette are the parents of three adult children. Colette is also an attorney with extensive experience, presently working in the Richmond City Commonwealth’s Attorney’s office.

Peter Welch
Vermont-At Large
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Peter Welch

Peter Welch has been a champion for working Vermonters throughout his career. Since his election to Congress in 2006, he has been widely recognized as a thoughtful and effective legislator who chooses governing over gridlock.

Peter’s record reflects his strong commitment to bringing people together to find common sense solutions to the difficult challenges facing our state and nation. In an era of partisanship, he has worked across the aisle to create jobs, increase access to affordable education and health care, invest in energy efficiency, protect our environment, and care for our veterans.

Peter was born in Springfield, Massachusetts in 1947. He graduated from the College of the Holy Cross in 1969. After working for a year in Chicago fighting housing discrimination as one of the first Robert F. Kennedy Fellows, he enrolled in law school at the University of California, Berkeley and graduated in 1973.

After law school, he settled in White River Junction, Vermont where he worked as a public defender before founding a small law practice. He was first elected to represent Windsor County in the Vermont Senate in 1980. In 1985, he was unanimously elected by his colleagues to lead the chamber, becoming the first Democrat in Vermont history to hold the position of President Pro Tempore.

In 2006, Peter was elected to Vermont’s only seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. His campaign gained nationwide attention for being the only contested congressional race in the country where both candidates refused to air negative ads.

In Congress, Peter is a leading advocate for energy efficiency, cutting the price of prescription drugs, investing in infrastructure, and expanding broadband and telemedicine in rural America.

Peter is a Chief Deputy Whip of the House Democratic Caucus and a member of the Democratic Steering and Policy Committee. He serves on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

He is married to Margaret Cheney, commissioner of the Vermont Public Utility Commission. They share a home in Norwich, Vermont.

Dan Newhouse
Washington-4
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Dan Newhouse

Representative Dan Newhouse is a lifelong resident of Central Washington and is honored to represent the 4th District in Congress. A third-generation Yakima Valley farmer, Dan brings real-world experience to Congress as a businessman and former state legislator ready to work hard in support of conservative solutions that encourage job creation and economic opportunity in Central Washington. Dan understands that looking out for taxpayers means that Congress must stay on budget and make the government work efficiently to fulfill its responsibilities.

Dan serves on the Appropriations Committees, which exercises jurisdiction on critical legislative issues for the 4th District. 

Dan served four terms as a legislator in the Washington State House of Representatives, representing the 15th Legislative District from 2003 to 2009. In the Legislature, Dan earned a reputation as a principled conservative willing to work with colleagues to support policies that foster economic growth.

From 2009 to 2013, Dan served as Director of Washington State’s Department of Agriculture, where he listened to the concerns of Washington farmers and promoted the state’s agricultural resources.

Dan attended Washington State University, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Economics. Dan is also a graduate of the Washington Agriculture and Forestry Leadership Program.

Dan lives in Sunnyside with his wife, Joan. He has two adult children: Jensena, Devon and his wife Halley. The Newhouse family continues to operate an 850-acre farm where they grow hops, tree fruit and grapes.

Bryan Steil
Wisconsin-1
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Bryan Steil

First elected in 2018, Congressman Bryan Steil represents Wisconsin’s First Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Bryan has built a reputation of working hard for Southeast Wisconsin during his first term in Congress. He’s made it a priority to be available and accessible to residents and listen to their concerns.  To hear directly from residents, Bryan has held numerous in-person town halls across the First District and when in person events were not possible, held numerous telephone town halls. His office is also here to help.  In 2019 alone, he helped more than 1,200 constituents receive assistance with federal agencies such as the Social Security Administration, VA, and Medicare. In addition, Bryan has held numerous public forums for our community regarding children’s mental health, robocalls and scams prevention, and the impact of trade deals on Wisconsin dairy and agriculture.

Bryan is a problem solver with extensive private sector experience who puts politics aside and focuses on issues impacting Wisconsin. As the co-chair of the Middle Class Jobs Caucus, Bryan works to fill the skills gap, improve access to education, and ensure families reach their full potential. Bryan is also the co-chair of the Future of Work Caucus to ensure workers have the skills and education to fill tomorrow’s jobs. In this role, Bryan brought together industry leaders from our community including UW-Parkside in Kenosha County and S.C. Johnson in Racine, to meet with caucus members in Washington, D.C. and work on real world solutions to the problems facing America.

As a member of the House Financial Services Committee, Bryan is focused on making the American dream achievable for everyone. He is focused on bringing family sustaining jobs to our communities by increasing investments in Southeast Wisconsin. For example, he authored the Expanding Investment in Small Businesses Act of 2019, which passed the House in July of 2019 by a vote of 417-2.  This bill allows entrepreneurs to obtain capital, hire workers, and create jobs right here in Wisconsin.  Bryan is working to grow job opportunities and provide entrepreneurs with the tools to hire and expand. 

Bryan is focused on keeping our communities safe. Bryan has built a coalition of 50 Members of Congress, Republicans and Democrats, and local law enforcement in Southeast Wisconsin to shine a light on the problem of human trafficking. Bryan’s bill, the Exposing the Financing of Human Trafficking Act, holds countries accountable and gets them to investigate, prevent, and prosecute financial criminal acts associated with human trafficking. In addition, Bryan is leading an effort to ensure Iran never obtains a nuclear weapon and enforce U.S. sanctions on European countries that trade with Iran.

Prior to being elected to Congress, Bryan spent a decade working in Wisconsin’s manufacturing industry - first with an industrial motion control manufacturer and later as an executive at a plastics manufacturer. There, he saw firsthand how burdensome federal regulations and red tape can hinder economic growth and job creation in Wisconsin. He also learned the importance of fighting for common sense solutions to even the toughest problems.  

In 2016, Bryan was appointed by the Governor of Wisconsin and unanimously confirmed in the Wisconsin Senate to serve on the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents. As a Regent, he oversaw the 26 UW system campuses, their 170,000 students, and a six billion dollar budget. He was known as a fiscal hawk who was focused on fighting for students. For example, Bryan supported initiatives that froze tuition to ensure all students had the opportunity to obtain an affordable high quality education.

Born and raised in Janesville, Bryan graduated from Janesville Craig High School, Georgetown University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is a member of St. John Vianney Parish in Janesville.

Mark Pocan
Wisconsin-2
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Mark Pocan

Congressman Mark Pocan was sworn in as the U.S. Representative for Wisconsin’s second congressional district in 2013 following 14 years in the Wisconsin State Assembly. A small business owner, union member, and lifelong advocate for progressive causes, Rep. Pocan is committed to using his experience from both the private and public sectors to fight for policies that promote economic and social justice and support the families of south central Wisconsin.

In the 116th Congress, he serves on the House Appropriations Committee where he sits on the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Subcommittee; the Agriculture, Rural Development, and Food and Drug Administration Subcommittee; and the Energy and Water Development Subcommittee. He previously served on the Budget Committee and the Committee on Education and the Workforce. Rep. Pocan is also the Co-Chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC), the largest values based caucus in the Democratic Party, where he is a strong voice for progressive values in Congress.

David McKinley
West Virginia-1
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David McKinley

David B. McKinley, P.E. has represented the First District of West Virginia since January 3, 2011.

Born in Wheeling in 1947, David attended public schools and worked his way through college, graduating from Purdue University with a degree in Civil Engineering. After graduation, he worked in the construction industry as a certified professional engineer.

David is the founder of McKinley and Associates — an architectural and engineering firm — with offices in Wheeling and Charleston, W.Va. and Washington, PA. Over the 44 years that David ran the business, he created hundreds of jobs.

As one of two professional engineers in Congress, he has a seat on the Committee on Energy and Commerce, where he has been active on issues related to the coal industry, environmental regulation, energy efficiency, and health care. He serves as the vice-chairman of the Subcommittee on Environment.

David is married to Mary (née Gerkin) from New Martinsville, West Virginia and they are the proud parents of four children and grandparents of six grandchildren.

Growing the UA Majority

Joyce Elliott
Arkansas-2
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Joyce Elliott

Joyce grew up in the tiny community of Willisville, Arkansas, where she graduated from high school in a class of nine students.  

Joyce was only the second person of color to graduate from the newly integrated school. Her older sister, Carolyn, was the first. Joyce earned an undergraduate degree in English and speech from Southern Arkansas University in Magnolia and a graduate degree in English from Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas.

Aware of the joyous virtue of education and the transformative power of politics at an early age, Joyce committed to becoming a public servant.

Her first path to public service led her to the classroom. For thirty years, Joyce taught high school juniors and seniors in our public schools (both Advanced Placement and standard classes).

After her teaching career, Joyce served as a State Representative from January 2001 through January 2007.  In her final term, she was Chair of the Education Committee and served on the Committees on Insurance and Commerce; Budget; Personnel; and Energy. In both her second and third terms in the House, Joyce was named by the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette as one of Arkansas's Ten Best Legislators.

oyce was elected to the Arkansas State Senate in November 2008, where she currently represents District 31. In her first term in the Arkansas Senate, Talk Business Arkansas magazine named her one of its Top Ten Legislators of 2009, the only freshman to be so named. Elliott currently serves on the Education Committee, where she is vice-chair; as well as the Insurance and Commerce; Budget; and Retirement Committees.

Joyce is the mother of one son, Elliott and the extremely proud grandmother to her granddaughter Athena. An outdoor enthusiast, Joyce enjoys traveling, especially to our National Parks, hiking, dancing, canoeing, zip lining, and whitewater rafting.

Hiral Tipirneni
Arizona-6
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Hiral Tipirneni

Dr. Hiral Tipirneni has dedicated her life to serving her community, solving problems, and improving lives. She’s served the Phoenix area for more than 20 years as an emergency room physician, cancer research advocate and, most recently, on the board of directors of the Maricopa Health Foundation, which supports the county’s public health care delivery system.

Hiral came to America from India with her family at the age of three. Her parents were seeking the American dream because they knew the United States was a place where, if you worked hard and lived by the rules of democracy, you could be successful no matter where you came from.

Her family struggled at first, but Hiral’s father eventually secured a job in his field of structural engineering in Ohio, where she and her brother were raised in a working-class suburb of Cleveland. Hiral’s mother, a social worker, was the director of a downtown Cleveland senior center and initiated its Meals on Wheels program. Hiral often accompanied her mother, and it was then she began to feel the tremendous impact small acts of service can have on another person.

Following a childhood illness, Hiral was inspired to learn more about medicine and, after graduating from public school, she eventually earned her medical degree through an accelerated, competitive program at Northeast Ohio Medical University. A passionate problem-solver who thrives on working with a team, Hiral chose to pursue emergency medicine because of the wide variety of challenges it presented, and it allowed her to be the first point of contact for patients.

Hiral met her husband, Dr. Kishore Tipirneni, during her first year of medical school. After she served as Chief Resident of the University of Michigan’s Emergency Medicine program, Hiral and Kishore looked for a place they could settle down, practice medicine, and begin raising a family. They sought somewhere that reflected the Midwestern values they both learned growing up. They chose Phoenix.

Kishore joined a well-established orthopedic surgery practice and Hiral began working in the emergency department at Banner Good Samaritan downtown. She went on to serve in emergency departments at the Maricopa County Medical Center, Banner Thunderbird, and Abrazo Arrowhead hospitals – all while raising their three children in the Arrowhead community.

After losing her mother and nephew to cancer, Hiral directed her passion and problem-solving skills to evaluating and directing funding for cutting-edge cancer research. She now leads teams of researchers, clinicians, and patient advocates in the fight to treat and cure breast cancer, prostate cancer, and childhood leukemia.

Always invested in strengthening her community and improving its quality of life, Hiral initiated and was the lead organizer for a TEDx event about effecting positive change in the Northwest Valley. She also serves on a number of nonprofit boards of directors. Now, Hiral is running for Congress to take on Washington insiders and continue using her problem-solving, team-oriented approach to work with Republicans and Democrats alike to get the results we need.

Christy Smith
California-25
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Christy Smith

Christy Smith has been living in Santa Clarita for nearly 40 years, has a husband and two daughters, and grew up being taught that life is about public service and doing the most good for the most people.

Christy Smith has dedicated much of her life to improving schools, classrooms, and opportunities for students here. She started her career at the U.S. Department of Education, working to root out waste so more funding would get where it was needed in the classrooms. Then, while her two daughters were in public school here, Christy saw that our public schools didn’t have access to the technology kids need to learn to succeed in today’s economy. So, she founded the Valencia Valley Technological Education Foundation that worked to connect schools to the internet and put computers in classrooms, to give students access to experts and learning resources all over the world.

Later, she ran for public office, in part because she saw how schools were failing our students and our economy. She fought for increased accountability and transparency in the state’s schools. And worked to help more students afford higher education, like community colleges and nursing schools. Nursing school helped Christy’s own mother build a life for herself and her children after leaving an abusive situation. Christy went to that same community college as her mom before attending UCLA and knows the power of education to build a strong middle class.

In the state legislature, Christy delivered for the district – securing millions of dollars for local colleges, childcare and health care clinics, and senior centers. She also fought to pass a groundbreaking paid family leave for new parents and caregivers, wrote the law to compensate victims of human trafficking so that they have a chance to rebuild their lives and co-authored a law that ensures first responders have mental healthcare covered in their workers’ compensation policy.

When COVID hit, Christy Smith worked with other community leaders in both political parties to get seniors food and masks, help people access unemployment benefits, connect small businesses with loans, and get more protective equipment. Now she’s focused on how to get California’s economy safely back on track. And recently, when that meant standing up to her own party to vote against taxes on small businesses and families, she did it without hesitation – even as fellow Democrats turned on her for putting taxpayers before party.

Christy doesn’t take a dime from Washington lobbyists, special interests, health insurance companies or big drug corporations. She’s seen how the health care system failed us first-hand when her mom, a lifelong nurse, died too young because she couldn't afford her medication and was too proud to tell her family. In Congress, Christy will ensure families in her community have affordable health care and prescription drugs, and don't have to suffer like hers did.

Margaret Good
Florida-16
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Margaret Good

As a state representative, Margaret has built a reputation as a legislator who reaches across the aisle to find solutions to help Florida’s working families by reducing health care costs, investing in our public education and university systems, and protecting Florida’s fragile environment, recognizing the important role our environment plays in our economy.

Margaret learned the value of service and of bringing communities together from her family. Her mother is a retired nurse and her father, a fourth generation Floridian, was an Episcopal priest whose ministry took the family to small towns all across the south. She also comes from a military family. Her uncle fought and died in Vietnam and her great grandfather and grandfather fought in World Wars I and II, respectively. Her family taught her the value of putting service to others above oneself. After college, she put her values to work at the United Way where she focused on helping families achieve financial stability and gain access to health care and early childhood education programs. There, she gained critical experience reaching common ground between business leaders, local governments, schools, and faith organizations. Margaret then worked at the Florida Agricultural Center and Horse Park, a vital economic development project linking commercial, environmental, and agricultural interests. Knowing she wanted to continue her service as a lawyer, Margaret attended the University of Florida Levin College of Law, where she served as editor of the Florida Law Review and graduated with honors. After law school, Margaret moved to Sarasota with her husband, Richard, and her dog, Barney, to build a life together. As an attorney at Matthews Eastmoore, Margaret has worked with businesses, individuals, and government entities to ensure the rights of members of our community are protected. Margaret knows we must end the partisan politics that hurt working families and do what’s right for a change. She will be a strong voice for each of the communities in the 16th district by building bridges and finding solutions to our most challenging problems. Margaret will bring the same work ethic and common sense leadership to Congress that has guided her as a non-profit leader, attorney, and legislator in order to make government work for our community.

Carolyn Bourdeaux
Georgia-7
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Carolyn Bourdeaux

I grew up in Roanoke, Virginia, the daughter of public school teachers. My parents had a deep sense of civic duty. However, my story took an unusual turn when my father, a professor, decided to quit his job and start a business selling paper animal hats! But the business went under during the recession of the 1990s, and my family went bankrupt. This was a very difficult time for us, but we persevered through the hardship thanks to family, friends, neighbors and our community rallying around us.

I was able to pursue a college degree because my country invested in me through public grants and federal loans. I worked hard and earned a Bachelor's from Yale, a Masters in Public Administration from the University of Southern California, and a Ph.D. in public administration with a focus on public finance from Syracuse University. My dad told me when I graduated, “Carolyn, this country has invested in you. Now, you must give back to your country.”

My husband Jeff and I moved to Suwanee because this area is a great place to raise a child. We were attracted to the great schools, great parks and natural beauty. We had also hoped our home would make it easier for our aging parents to visit and potentially move in with us if needed.

Like many citizens of this area, however, my parents struggled with the cost of health care. In fact, their health care costs became so burdensome that they couldn’t afford their medications, much less to pick up and move. My mother cared for my aging and very sick father until they both passed away in 2017. All of their discretionary income was eaten up paying for medications, including ones to treat my father’s diabetes. This problem is not at all unique to my family, and in fact, by many standards, we are lucky. So many of us have horror stories about our health care system. And one reason I’m running for Congress is I firmly believe we can do better.

I have spent my life working to create public services and policies that would truly help people. I started my career as an aide to Senator Ron Wyden, working on health care, education, women’s issues, social issues and transportation. One of the most important lessons I learned there was how to stretch federal dollars so we could help people without leaving the next generation to drown in debt.

Among my many projects, I worked on an innovative program to better connect transportation with land use planning and design. This was a precursor to the Livable Communities Project that has revitalized many downtown communities here in the 7th District. I also worked on legislation that helped expand access to the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program and access to Federally Qualified Health Centers while saving the federal government money.

I have been a Professor at the Andrew Young School of Public Policy since 2003. From 2007 to 2010, I took a leave of absence to be Director of Georgia’s Senate Budget and Evaluation Office. There, I worked in a nonpartisan role to help the state balance the budget during the Great Recession.

The Senate honored me for significant service to the state of Georgia with Senate Resolution 1598. Afterward, I returned to the Andrew Young School and founded the Center for State and Local Finance to teach the next generation of leaders about responsible and compassionate public policy.

I’ve never been content to sit behind a desk. In this unsettled and difficult time, running for Congress is a continuation of my commitment to finding ways to help my neighbors and my community through public service.

Michelle De La Isla
Kansas-2
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Michelle De La Isla

Born of humble beginnings in New York, she faced many challenges at a young age. Early in life, her mom fled for safety with her and her brother to Puerto Rico to live with her grandparents. By age 17, she was homeless, and at 19, pregnant. Rather than feel sorry for herself, Michelle made a conscious decision to overcome her circumstances and finish her degree.

She moved to Kansas in 2000 and graduated from Wichita State University with a bachelor of science degree in biology, after eight years of trying. That summer, she worked as a teacher for Upward Bound and unfortunately discovered that others faced challenges similar to hers, igniting a fire for advocacy and service that to this day cannot be extinguished. She relocated to Topeka and soon after became a single mom of three children.

In 2005, Michelle joined MANA National and traveled around the country educating women on financial literacy. She was also one of the founding members of the local Hermanitas chapter for mentorship of Latina girls. As her community involvement developed, she participated in the Capital District Group to advocate and develop the current Downtown Topeka plan.

In 2010, she became Executive Director of Topeka Habitat for Humanity where she established the first office, the ReStore and exponentially increased service delivery. She works alongside Dr. Morse to deliver an annual girls empowerment conference at Washburn University where more than 170 Topeka girls attend. Michelle supports the Rescue Mission as a volunteer and serves on the board of MANA National.

In 2013, Michelle was elected to City Council and served as Deputy Mayor in 2016. She is the Diversity and Inclusion Representative at Westar Energy and the Mayor of Topeka. Michelle’s greatest honor is being called Erick, Cristina, and Lorraine’s mom.

Hillary Scholten
Michigan-3
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Hillary Scholten

My story is a West Michigan story.

My great, great grandparents emigrated from the Netherlands to build a better life in Grand Rapids.

My mom worked as an elementary school teacher, and my dad was a reporter and an assistant sports editor for the Grand Rapids Press.

My husband Jesse and I are raising our sons, James (age 9) and Wesley (age 7) in Grand Rapids, around the corner from the house my grandfather was raised in and right up the road from the one my grandma grew up in.

My West Michigan roots, my family, and my Christian faith have shaped who I am, and inspired me to always think critically, and stand up for what’s right.

Growing up, my mom’s work at a high-poverty school put us in touch with struggling families and students facing difficult times. We opened our homes to these families in ways big and small.

Seeing those families working hard, playing by the rules, and still living in poverty, disturbed me and refused to let me ignore the injustices right in front of me. So I took the lessons I learned from my mom, and from my church, and dedicated my life to helping others.

I led the kids summer program at Mel Trotter Ministries, a non-profit that helps homeless women and their children (among others) get back on their feet. I later earned a degree in social work and became a case worker for the Aids Action Committee, where I helped members of the LGBTQ+ community who faced housing discrimination.

We need fresh perspectives in Congress. We need leaders who have seen firsthand the way policies impact people. My experience working with homeless families at Mel Trotter Ministries while leading the kids summer program, advocating for working families experiencing employment violations as an attorney here in Grand Rapids, and advising the Department of Justice on immigration policy during the Obama Administration has given me deep and broad knowledge of the ways our laws work—and more often don’t—for everyday people.”

I’m running for Congress because we need a leader who is committed to putting forth common sense solutions to the pressing problems facing West Michigan, from housing shortages to a national immigration crisis that is felt daily on a local level. I’m running to make our schools even stronger. I’m running because our healthcare system is broken. I’m running because everyone deserves clean, running water. I’m running because it’s time women and girls in West Michigan saw themselves reflected in their national leadership. I’m running to be a voice for West Michigan.

Kathleen Williams
Montana-At Large
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Kathleen Williams

Kathleen Williams has a long history serving the people of Montana; she is just as comfortable rolling up her sleeves to work in rural fields as she is working to pass legislation in the Capitol.

Her thirty-four-year career in natural resources and public service traverses the public, private, and non-profit sectors. Throughout her career she has worked with people of all political stripes to find win-win solutions to Montana’s most pressing problems including healthcare, job creation, and Montana's outdoor heritage.

Kathleen is the daughter of a World War II veteran, Harrison, and a woman who left Oklahoma to move west and work in the Navy shipyards, Marie. The youngest of four daughters, Kathleen was born at Letterman Army Hospital in San Francisco. As she and her sisters grew up, all were conscripted into piano lessons and working for Harrison’s general contracting firm. Love of music and the outdoors, the values of hard work and service, and what it means to pay your bills and balance a checkbook, both for a family and a business, were core values of Kathleen’s household.

Kathleen’s parents also taught her that family is always there for each other. When she was 11, Marie started to lose her memory. She got lost driving, and Kathleen would ride her bike out to find Marie and help her get home. At only the age of 49, Marie was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Kathleen and Harrison became caregivers for eight years until Marie passed away. An illness like that can take a toll on a family: it’s hard. But they were there for each other, just like Montanans are there for your families.

Later in life, Kathleen met the love of her life, Tom. A Vietnam-era veteran and a civilian advisor in Iraq, Tom and his sons, Calen and Sander, became a core part of Kathleen’s life as they shared their love of the outdoors. Tom and Kathleen were married for nearly 15 years until Tom passed away in 2016.

Kathleen Williams graduated with a B.S. in Resource Economics from U.C. Berkeley, and from Colorado State University with an M.S. in Recreation Resources. As the Associate Director at the Western Landowners Alliance, she served as a resource on water and policy issues, told the story of private land conservation through film, and provided information important to the ecological, economic, and cultural pulse of over 14 million acres of privately held land in the West.

Kathleen hunts and fishes, hikes and canoes, and protects sustainable public access to the incredible rivers and mountains that all Montanans have the right to utilize and the responsibility to protect. She enjoys cycling, music, and a good two-step. Kathleen is step-mom to two adult boys and an overactive German wirehair pointer named Danni.

Pat Timmons-Goodson
North Carolina-8
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Pat Timmons-Goodson

Patricia “Pat” Timmons-Goodson was born into a military family. As the eldest child, her father expected her to serve as the example for her five younger siblings. His early loss instilled in her the value of time and the people in her life. Pat’s mother was a homemaker and taught her a strong work ethic, a commitment to her community and a firm faith in God. 

She was one of the first African-American students to become a double Tar Heel, earning her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While at UNC, she met Ernest J. Goodson, a dental school student and her future husband.

After law school, Pat oversaw Fayetteville operations for the U.S. Census Office in Charlotte during the 1980 count. Following the census, she became a respected Cumberland County assistant district attorney. Her roots in the Cumberland County courthouse run deep. 

Following her tenure as a Cumberland County prosecutor, Pat worked as a legal services attorney for Legal Aid. And in 1984 at 29 years of age, she became the first African-American woman on the 12th judicial District Court. She would go on to be elected to three consecutive terms by the voters of the 12th judicial district.

Into her third term, Pat was elevated to the North Carolina Court of Appeals in 1997. Nine years later, she was honored to become the first African-American woman on the North Carolina Supreme Court. North Carolina voters ratified the Governor’s appointment in a resounding statewide victory later that same year.

She stepped down from the Supreme Court in 2012 and was appointed to the United States Commission on Civil Rights in 2014. The Commission addresses many issues, from water contamination in rural towns to voting access. Pat believes that each generation is charged with strengthening America and continuing its centuries of progress. 

In April 2016, the President again confirmed Pat’s distinguished record of service by nominating her to serve as a judge of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina. The American Bar Association unanimously gave her its highest rating:  Well-Qualified. Unfortunately, the Senate never acted on her nomination. 

Along with these professional accolades, Pat raised two sons with Dr. Goodson. She understands the struggles of working families. She balanced her family and professional life to build a career in public service. She will take that experience to Congress to stand up for working families.

She was also awarded the Order of the Long Leaf Pine, the highest award offered for state service. The North Carolina Bar Association named her a Liberty Bell Award recipient. That honor recognizes an individual “who has strengthened the American System of freedom under law.” She is also listed in the North Carolina Women’s Hall of Fame. Pat has received three honorary degrees.

Today, Pat and her husband, Dr. Ernest Goodson, live in Fayetteville where she is active in her church, First Baptist. Along with her degrees from the University of North Carolina, she earned a Master of Laws at Duke University School of Law.

Amy Kennedy
New Jersey-2
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Amy Kennedy

Amy is the Education Director of The Kennedy Forum where she pursues partnerships and collaborations that emphasize evidence-based research and programming to facilitate policy change in the areas of education and mental health.

An educator by training, Amy has more than a decade of experience working in public schools in New Jersey. Her experiences as a teacher and as a mother of five propel her efforts and advocacy around social-emotional learning and mental wellness for children and adolescents.

Amy serves on the boards of Mental Health America, a leading national advocacy organization and Parity.org, which promotes gender parity at the highest levels of business.

She is an advisory board member of Interaxon, a mental health technology company; Set To Go, a JED program helping teens transition from high school to college and adulthood with special emphasis on mental wellness and emotional preparedness; and Brain Futures.

Amy holds a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education from Pennsylvania State University and a Master of Science in Environmental Education from Nova Southeastern University.

Amy was born in Atlantic City and grew up in Pleasantville and Absecon, New Jersey. She and her husband, former Congressman Patrick J. Kennedy, live in southern New Jersey with their five children.

Jackie Gordon
New York-2
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Jackie Gordon

Jackie Gordon is a combat veteran, an educator, a public servant, and a community leader. Jackie was born in Jamaica, West Indies, and grew up in Queens, NY. While in college and teaching in local schools, she enlisted in the United States Army Reserve. 

Over her 29-year career in the Armed Forces, Jackie served our country overseas as a platoon leader in Germany during Operation Desert Storm, as an operations officer at Guantanamo Bay during the Global War on Terror, as a battle captain in Baghdad during the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, and as Commander of the 310th Military Police Battalion in Afghanistan in 2012. She retired from the Army Reserve with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in 2014.

Gordon spent three decades working in New York public schools, and has earned degrees in education from Hunter College and Queens College. As a former guidance counselor at Wilson Technological Center in Farmingdale, Jackie has mentored and advised Long Island high schoolers, guiding them into productive lives, into college, and into the workforce. 

From 2007 to 2020, she served on the Babylon Town Council, where she worked to direct resources to veterans and military families as Chair of the Veterans Advisory Council, pushed for the revitalization of Wyandanch Village, which has breathed new life into the community, and helped raise nearly $1 million for the Wounded Warriors Project through the annual Soldier Ride in Babylon.

Jackie lives in Copiague with her son Augustus. Her daughter, Kerrianne, is a Captain in the U.S. Air Force.

Kate Schroder
Ohio-1
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Kate Schroder

Kate is a health care advocate and a bi-partisan problem solver. A 5th generation Cincinnatian, a cancer survivor and a mom, she has spent her career lowering costs and improving health outcomes. She’s not running to push a partisan agenda or play party politics. She’s running to do what our elected officials are meant to do—to serve the people they represent, to set ego aside, and to focus on results. Kate’s running to put people over politics and to listen, collaborate, and work passionately on behalf of all people here at home.

Throughout her more than 15 years as a health care advocate, Kate has worked on behalf of others. She prioritizes what matters to all of us – seeing a doctor when we’re sick, providing our kids with a good education, and having jobs that allow us to take care of our families. Kate is focused on what we share and will work with our community so that we can do better for us all.

Kate has been active in civic affairs since returning to Cincinnati in 2013. She most recently served as Vice President of the Clinton Health Access Initiative, where she improved treatment rates for childhood illnesses in limited-resource countries. She was appointed to the Cincinnati Board of Health in 2016 and currently serves as the Finance Chair. In 2017, she was named a WCPO Next Nine honoree, distinguishing her as one of nine rising stars who are transforming the health care sector.

Kate is the second of four children raised in a 5th generation Cincinnati family. She grew up in Pleasant Ridge among a family of medical professionals who taught her that service to others is a core value.

Kate attended grade school at Nativity School and high school at Ursuline Academy, where she served as student body president. She pursued higher education at Indiana University, where she was student body treasurer. After graduation, she worked in legislative politics for three years—first for Senator Evan Bayh in D.C. and then for the Cincinnati City Council.

Seeing the opportunity to bring business solutions to the public sector, Kate received her MBA from Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in 2004. She used her degree to join the Advisory Board Company in D.C. as a health care researcher and consultant. She then relocated to Africa through the Clinton Health Access Initiative to serve as the Zambia Country Director for two years. During this time she launched programs in pediatric HIV, lab services, and human resources for health. Upon returning to the U.S., she has served in several leadership positions, managed global programs in children’s health, and published her results in academic journals.

Kate and her husband, John Juech, currently live in Clifton with their two children—a 6-year old daughter Josie and 4-year old son Peter.

Kate’s connection to the healthcare system is personal. In 2011, her life was transformed after being diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Through the treatment process, Kate discovered firsthand what’s broken within our current healthcare system and experienced how access to affordable, quality care can be the difference between life and death. While she is now cancer-free, she’s determined to create a future where everyone can receive the treatment they need without worrying about unmanageable costs. Kate was also very close to her father Dr. Lou Schroder, a renowned Cincinnati oncologist and active local leader, who passed away in 2017 at 69 after a three-month battle with glioblastoma.

Eugene DePasquale
Pennsylvania-10
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Eugene DePasquale

Eugene grew-up in a typical working-class family. When he wasn’t in school, Eugene waited tables or washed dishes at the family’s neighborhood restaurant. What little time was left he spent on the courts and fields playing basketball, football and baseball.

At home, Eugene was the oldest of three siblings. His dad, a Vietnam veteran, was shot during the war and at times struggled with addiction to pain killers prescribed by the VA hospital to help cope with his injuries. Mom worked at the restaurant to provide for the family and Eugene pitched-in at home to help his brothers.

Things grew more challenging in high school for Eugene and his family. His youngest brother, Anthony, was diagnosed with Muscular Dystrophy, an affliction that slowly eats away muscle strength. Health insurance companies declared it a pre-existing condition and denied coverage. Medical bills piled-up. Anthony grew weaker and was forced into a wheelchair. More care was required and a van with a wheelchair lift needed to be purchased. Eugene’s family was struggling.

Even Eugene’s college years were punctured by challenges. His father made the poor choice to illegally sell drugs and was sent to prison. Things couldn’t get much darker for his family when complications from Muscular Dystrophy caused Eugene’s brother to collapse while attending a college basketball game. Paramedics at the game valiantly tried to save him but Anthony passed away several hours later at the hospital.

Eugene’s father attended Anthony’s funeral in hand-cuffs and shackles. The family faced more medical bills and funeral costs, totaling tens of thousands of dollars.

Despite the adversity, Eugene worked his way through and excelled in college, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts from College of Wooster, a Masters of Public Administration from the University of Pittsburgh, and a Juris Doctorate from Widener School of Law.

After nearly nine years, Eugene’s father was released from prison early, clean and sober, and works today fixing-up homes and reselling them.

Eugene’s upbringing and the people he grew-up around, in school, and at the family’s neighborhood restaurant shaped his life and provided him direction after college and law school. He worked at a non-profit that helped young people with mental and physical disabilities and then embarked on a public service career.

Eugene immediately challenged Harrisburg’s status quo and set an example as a reformer. He demanded more government accountability and transparency – and became Pennsylvania’s first public official to publicly post all of his expenses on-line. He returned unused office expenses to taxpayers and called on Harrisburg leaders to do the same.

He earned the trust of people he represented because he didn’t let them down and proved he could be counted on to help them – and they re-elected him by wide margins.

As Auditor General, Eugene has taken on entrenched bureaucrats, special interests, and fraudsters.

He helped protect children from abuse, demanded thousands of untested rape kits be processed, exposed abuse in nursing homes, and saved Pennsylvania taxpayers millions by shining a light on government waste, fraud and abuse. Arguably, Eugene has proven to be Pennsylvania’s hardest-working and most effective auditor general.

Sri Preston Kulkarni
Texas-22
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Sri Preston Kulkarni

Sri is a lifelong public servant and national security expert who has spent his career overseas working to protect Americans here at home. From Jerusalem to Iraq to Russia, Sri served in some of the toughest places in the world, representing the interests of the United States and reducing conflict around the globe. In Congress, Sri will use his experience to seek common ground, find solutions, and address the needs of every Texan.

Sri was raised in a middle-class family by an immigrant father and a mother whose roots date back to Sam Houston. Growing up in Houston, Sri personally experienced the same challenges that our communities are facing today: his family started in a 2 Bedroom apartment with 9 people, he had to bus across town to attend a better public school, he personally experienced gun violence, crime, and a broken criminal justice system.

For Sri, the most personal issue is the importance of affordable, quality healthcare. When Sri was 18, his father was diagnosed with leukemia, and Sri dropped out of the University of Texas to come home to care for him. After Sri’s father passed away, medical bills left their family on the verge of bankruptcy, and Sri helped raise his three younger siblings. Working several jobs, he graduated with honors from UT.

Sri later received a Pearson Fellowship to serve as a defense, foreign policy, and veterans’ affairs advisor in the U.S. Senate, working on some of the most critical threats facing our national security. Sri went on to earn a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Harvard, where he started an initiative called “Breaking Bread,” aimed at reducing the partisan hostility and divisiveness afflicting our country.

Inspired by a calling to serve his country, Sri was commissioned as a United States Foreign Service Officer by Secretary of State Colin Powell. In the Foreign Service, Sri served tours overseas in Iraq, Israel, Russia, Taiwan, and Jamaica, promoting American values, such as women’s rights, a free press, and religious tolerance. He speaks English, Spanish, Hebrew, Hindi, Russian, and Mandarin Chinese. If elected, he will become the first person of Hindu faith and first Asian American Member of Congress from Texas.

Candace Valenzuela
Texas-24
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Candace Valenzuela

Candace Valenzuela is a mother, an educator, and a lifelong Texan. She overcame incredible odds growing up, and she has since devoted her life to fighting for opportunities for others. She first ran for her local school board to improve Texas schools, becoming the first Latina and first African-American woman to serve on the Carrollton-Farmers Branch school board. Candace is the Democratic nominee for Congress in Texas’ 24th District; she’s running to stand up for all Texas children and their families.

The daughter of U.S. Army veterans, Candace was born and raised in El Paso, Texas into a family with generations of military service. Her great-grandfather came to the United States from Mexico, eventually fighting in World War I. And her grandfather fought in World War II. She often says that her father once jumped out of airplanes for a living, while her mother fixed them.

After her mother left the military, her family struggled financially and, for a time, they were homeless. Despite these challenges, Candace persevered and excelled, becoming her high school’s First Distinguished Graduate. She then graduated from Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, California, on a full scholarship, becoming the first in her family to graduate from college. Grateful for these opportunities she could not have afforded on her own, Candace knew that she wanted to give back. She pursued work in education, including mentoring youth, tutoring, and working with special-needs students. But the moment that inspired her to enter public service was when she became a mother.

Determined to fight for access to education, Candace became involved in local politics and ran for office for the first time in 2017, when she was elected to the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District board as an at-large representative, defeating an 18-year incumbent. Since joining the board, she has been an advocate for greater fiscal transparency and worked to expand STEM education, vocational training, and coding academies in district schools. She has also pushed for funding for school renovations and focused on making sure the district is inclusive and welcoming to students of all backgrounds.

Now, running for Congress, Candace built a powerful and diverse grassroots movement focused on uplifting all hardworking families. She knows, intimately, the impact when a family can’t afford a place to live or food to eat. She has struggled to afford costly medical bills due to a pre-existing condition. Candace’s lived experience informs her views and she believes we cannot address these issues if our leaders are more focused on appeasing donors and corporate PACs than representing their constituents.

Candace and her husband, Andy, live in Dallas and are the proud parents of two children: Cleto, born in 2015, and Jacinto, born in 2018.

Cameron Webb
Virginia-5
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Cameron Webb

Growing up in Spotsylvania, VA, Cameron’s mother, a public-school speech therapist, and father, an HR manager with the DEA, taught Cameron to take an active role in his community and serve others. His parents encouraged all their children to dream big and work hard—lessons that Cameron carries with him today.
 
After graduating from UVA and getting his medical and law degrees, Cameron was tapped by President Obama for the White House Fellowship. He served on the White House Health Care Team and also worked on President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper Initiative, where he helped tackle issues in education, workforce development and criminal justice reform.

A practicing physician, Cameron returned to Charlottesville where he treats patients as a general internist, teaches students and serves as the Director of Health Policy and Equity at UVA’s School of Medicine. His wife, Dr. Leigh-Ann Webb, is an ER doctor who grew up in Appomattox County. They reside in Albemarle County where they raise their two children, Avery and Lennox.
 
Now, Cameron is running for Congress to serve his community at this critical time. In Washington, he will be a fierce advocate to ensure opportunities for health and success for all Virginians.

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